Exercise With Plantar Fasciitis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Exercise for plantar fasciitis foot?
    I have plantar fasciitis and was wondering what kind of exercises can I continue with. Can I do walking and lift weights?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, that will help. My doctor also gave me some stretches to do where you point your foot back towards you then away and then back. Those help and walking with weights really helped. I lost some weight too and have not had a problem with my plantar fascititis in 2 years! Good luck. If you work at it you can see great improvement.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can you exercise with plantar fasciitis without making it hurt worse?
    Thanks to the development of plantar fasciitis in my right foot, I've had to change a lot of things in my life:

    - I bought a 0 pair of shoes
    - My foot hurts a lot
    - I try not to walk too much cause my foot hurts
    - I've gain 15 pounds :(

    I NEED to exercise, but I'm afraid to. My podiatrist gave me a steroid shot in my foot and prescribed these pricey shoes, but my food still hurts and I'm afraid to walk on it. But I know the extra weight is only making it worse. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi dear. I am sorry that you are in pain. I wouldn't walk or run on it now since it hurts so much. However, there are still plenty of things you can do. Does your gym have an indoor pool? Aqua aerobics and aqua running classes are all the rage now. I do vigorous aqua running classes with 5 herniated disks, and I am fine. (If that's not your cup of tea, then plain swimming.) How about pilates or yoga classes? Or strength training classes? (Just be careful not to overstress your foot.) Did you doctor recommend physical therapy? PT can definitely help. Also, you may want to try stationary biking or even the elliptical machine. (If the elliptical machine hurts, stop right away - this is a standing exercise so I am not sure if you are quite ready for that yet, but biking should be safe.) Are you icing it at all? Ice would help because you have inflammation. You can definitely keep active if you do the right stuff. Just don't push yourself to do too much before you are ready - take it from me, I have reinjured myself many times and have learned the hard way. Please take care and feel better. :-)

  3. QUESTION:
    Can I exercise with Plantar Fasciitis?
    I really like to walk and I think I overdid it on the treadmill, increased my speed too quickly. If I walk slowly around the block and don't push it, can I exercise with Plantar Fasciitis? For those unfamiliar with this, it hurts right on the back of my heel.

    • ANSWER:
      I would take it easy for a 2-4 weeks. The main reason you get plantar fasciitis is from repetitive micro-trauma, usually from running. The treatment for this is as follows:

      * Wear shoes with adequate arch support and cushioned heels. Discard old running shoes and wear new ones.

      * Avoid long periods of standing.

      * Lose weight.

      * Stretch the plantar fascia and Achilles tendon, especially before participating in exercise.

      * Use Non Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain, if you are not allergic to these (Ibuprofen, Motrin, Aleve).

      * Do not exercise on hard surfaces.

      * Avoid walking barefooted on hard surfaces.

      * Avoid high-impact sports, such as aerobics and volleyball, which require a lot of jumping.

      These suggestions are from: emedicine.com

      Good luck!!

  4. QUESTION:
    Exercising with Plantar Fasciitis?
    Hi all,

    I think I have the beginning stages of plantar fasciitis, so I'm going to lay off running for a bit and do some other forms of exercise. Would leg exercises (resistance training) be ok? Hence, squats, leg press, calve raises, etc. I'm guessing not, but the fasciitis doesn't seem to flare with resistance training. What about other forms of cardio?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Freight, just do these exercises and the problem should clear up. From a long sitting position or lying on your back with the legs out straight. Keep the knees absolutely straight and have the muscles of the feet pull them up towards the shins. The only action that is taking place is at the ankles. You will know that it is being done correctly as there will be a pulling sensation in the calves. Hold that pull for about 10 seconds and then rest for a few seconds. Repeat that about 5 to 10 times. This should be done at least twice a day with the best times being right before you go to bed and just upon awakening. It can also be done before and after an activity. The next movement is to squat down on the floor while keeping the heels fully on the floor. You may need to hold onto something initially until you develop enough strength to maintain your balance independently. Stay in that position for 30 seconds. This movement should be done barefooted. Again this should be done at least twice a day. By doing those movements it should stop the problem that you are having and allow a full return to activity.

  5. QUESTION:
    Best cardio exercise equipment for someone with Plantar fasciitis?
    I've gained about 20 pounds in the last year and have also developed plantar fasciitis in my right foot. I'm currently doing stretching exercises and wearing shoe inserts. I had planned to start walking but that's not an option right now. What is the best cardio exercise equipment for me that won't put unnecessary pressure on my foot?

    • ANSWER:
      Aqua Jogging, go to the local swimming pool and see if they run classes. Best of Luck

  6. QUESTION:
    Help me learn to exercise around my plantar fasciitis?
    I have moderate to severe chronic plantar fasciitis. Due to bone abnormalities in my hips, femurs, and in my feet themselves, it's something that just isn't going to go away. I've learned to deal with it, but I don't want it to interfere with my ability to live a healthy, active life. Could anyone help me learn how to exercise around it? Does anyone know of any types of running shoes that are good for my condition? I used to love running before this happened and I'd really like to start again.

    • ANSWER:
      For the kind of shoes, the kind that I found helpful for my feet is ones called Asics that have a gel in them. These kind of shoes are good for helping to support the foot.

      As for specific exercises I don't know of anything in particular but one thing that can be of help is to get a piece of PVC pipe and roll your foot over it. It may hurt at first because you are trying to work that fascia but over time it gets a bit easier (I learned that while I was going to physical therapy for my foot and ankle after I had surgery on it last year for other problems).

      Another thing that could be of help is trying a pair of orthotic inserts (you can find some over the counter like those by Dr. Scholls' to see if that is of some help).

      I am also including the link to a site that may help you find more information about exercises that can be of help with Plantar Fasciitis. The link is at: http://physicaltherapy.about.com

      However, I would recommend consulting with a foot specialist called a Podiatrist before trying anything to see what they say.

  7. QUESTION:
    What are some exercises to help plantar fasciitis?
    I have been struggling with plantar fasciitis for about a month now, and my feet are still bothering me. I have been icing my feet several times a day and I also stretch regularly. I was wondering what other exercises there are that would help with the pain so I can start training for cross country. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Wow, that can be extremely painful! The fascia (or plastic wrap-type covering of the tendons around the heel area) can become swollen, tight, and compress the nerves causing extreme pain. Mine used to hurt when I was running all over the hospital floors when working as a registered nurse. If you cannot give your foot (or feet) some absolute rest, they will not get a chance to decrease in swelling. The cold packs or ice will help, but sometimes it takes more than that. Your feet are really asking for non-weight bearing rest and gentle movements.
      Injections hurt worse than the pain (or they did for me) although it can really help decrease the swelling and thereby reduce or get rid of the pain completely. Did I mention how much those injections hurt?
      Check this website out, as well as WebMD for very helpful suggestions and best wishes for a speedy recovery!
      http://www.plantar-fasciitis.org/

  8. QUESTION:
    I am physically active. Just been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis . What exercises can I still do?
    The problem is in my right foot. No pain when working out, afterward is a different story. Need some exercise tips to help tone legs and arms to help with mobility.

    • ANSWER:
      What did your doctor say. Plantar fasciitis is not that bad. You need to exercise your foot. Take can of soup or beans take your shoe foot off put your foot on the can and roll it.

  9. QUESTION:
    Exercising with plantar fasciitis?
    Although I haven't yet confirmed it with a doctor (I'm trying to get an appointment), I am reasonably sure I have plantar fasciitis, aka heel spurs. I know my weight is a serious factor in the problem, and being on my feet complicates matters. I need to exercise to lose the weight, but exercise makes my feet hurt that much worse.

    I don't have easy access to a swimming pool, or I'd do water workouts. I'm willing to purchase equipment, but I'm not sure what to buy. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      if you do the elliptical, there is less impact since you are gliding on your heels as opposed to running where you slam your feet down. Also, the rowing machine works really well and you are sitting down and mainly using your upper body. Try doing pilates and reps laying down to burn fat in your hip and thigh areas and belly. this won't require your feet.

  10. QUESTION:
    diabetics with acute plantar fasciitis?
    i am a diabetic with type 2 symptoms.Can't do walking exercise due to plantar fasciitis.I am 62 yrs.Canyou suggest a remedy to reduce the sugar reading from the present 170 with out the use of drug.

    • ANSWER:
      I will tell you my opinion, however, you do need to talk to your doc about it and if it is possible to lower it without meds.

      But regardless, these things will help (if you are on meds or not). Eat right. Stay as clear of carbs as possible, loose weight if you need to, eat lean meats and whole carbs like brown rice, oatmeal, etc. when you do eat them.

      You can still exercise even without your feet. Look up chair exercises online or seated exercises. You will find that most of them will be to build muscle, but if you do them fast enough, they will also give you an aerobic workout. And the more muscle you build, the better off you will be.

      Make sure you check with your doc first, as I am not one nor do I know anything about your situation.

  11. QUESTION:
    Aside from swimming, what are the best exercises for a person with plantar fasciitis?
    The treadmill aggravates it as does normal walking. I know swimming is good, but what other exercises can be done to help keep me in shape with minimal risk of re aggravating the foot.
    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too. I go to Curves for women which is sorta a circuit training thing. I do stretches eveyday whenever I feel my feet starting to hurt. I do a half lunge using the wall for support(facing it). But the key is to keep your straight leg on the ground, don't lift it off the floor. You'll feel the pulling from your calf down, and it will loosen up the muscles. I love that one! I also use a large stretching rubber band , lay on my back, wrap it around my foot and pull as I move my foot in the up and down flex positions. Try custom orthotics if you can't get relief. I have them and I almost never have pain now. Insurance should cover a good portion of the cost.

  12. QUESTION:
    If I lost weight, would the pain from my plantar fasciitis go away?
    I am approximately 50 pounds overweight, and it's hard to exercise with this problem of my feet...was wondering if anyone had plantar fasciitis, and losing weight help it... Thanks~!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi
      losing weight will surely help you to get rid from plantar fasciitis but it is not enough. You should do more things to treat it. I have plantar fasciitis myself for a few months now. My podiatrist prescribed me with Custom made orthotics which did not work at all. I understood that treatment efficiency is very individual. If something works for one it may not work for the other. I took of weight and changed my job conditions and I am much better today.
      There are many treatment techniques that you can try. There are Taping techniques that I find very useful. There are a few more self-care techniques that I got from this informative website:
      http://www.plantar-fasciitis-elrofeet.com/How_is_Plantar_Fasciitis_Treated
      As for exercise you can ride a bicycle or swim without any foot pain.
      Take care & Good luck

  13. QUESTION:
    What are some recommended shoes for running / gym training that help with plantar fasciitis?
    I'll typically be doing elliptical / treadmill types of exercise, but would be nice if the shoe had support for regular walking as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Earl's answer for everything is "barefootrunningshoes.com". Every single answer he gives has his website in there somewhere.

      When combating plantar fasciitis you need two things. One being arch support. Ideally you can get some custom orthodics fitted by a podiatrist who has a background in sports medicine, and/or is also a runner. If you are unable to get orthodics you can get some special sticky pads (at medical supply stores) to stick to the bottom of your arch to help provide the "lift" you need.

      The other thing you need is to stretch your calves. Alternate each calf 10 seconds. 10 times. Do that 6 times a day (minimum to start). Once the pain subsides you can cut back to a couple or three times a day, but you need to stay on top of your calf stretches.

      PF can cripple you if you are not careful. I was sidelined for 18 months.

  14. QUESTION:
    Any women with PLANTAR FASCIITIS have any recommendations on SHOES?
    Looking for brands, styles, websites with best prices, etc. I have to walk a lot at work some days, and also used to enjoy walking my dog for exercise. I need a decent looking pair of work shoes first & foremost - please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I had this condition last year. My Dr. sent me to a runners store. I wore these shoes for a year and I have absolutely no more pain. They are runners shoes and not that great looking, but they did the trick. They are Mizuno wave riders.

  15. QUESTION:
    how do you get read of Plantar fasciitis?
    I've been able to walk or jog for exercise for almost 3 months now. I'm taking naprosin, iceing, etc... with no relief.

    • ANSWER:
      I had plantar fascitis six years ago. I had to go to a massage therapist and have them massage my right heel and I had to do stretch exercises where you extend your toes upward to allow the calf muscle to s-t-r-e-t-c-h; Ive also lost 60 lbs in the meantime. The weight loss was the best approach but it took three long years.

  16. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis- what's YOUR experience of it and how do you deal with it?
    Have you or a member of your family got plantar fasciitis? It's really painful and I'm trying gentle exercises but sometimes I really have to take painkillers.
    Is it good or bad to bandage it if I have to do a bit of walking (which I do a lot)?
    Is it worth getting physio?
    Thank you for your answers.
    Please don't post links to websites, which I can find myslef. I'd really like your personal experiences. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have been treating this problem for many years and have found this to be successful. Lie on your back either in bed or on the floor. Keep the knees straight and have the muscles of the feet pull the front of the feet up towards the knees. There should be a pulling or stretching sensation in the calves. Hold this stretch for ten seconds and repeat four more times. Do this right before you go to bed at night and immediately before getting out of bed in the morning. Once you have the hang of stretching this way it can be done standing or sitting. The more that it is done the faster the problem goes away. Another stretch that will help is to learn to squat on the floor while keeping your heels down. In the beginning you will have to hold on to something to maintain your balance but after a while you should be able to do this without any assistance. The last movement is to take a 2x4 or large book and while sitting place the heels on the board or book with the front of the feet on the floor. Place a light ankle weight on the front of the foot and slowly raise just the front of the foot while maintaining the heel on the board or book. Do this ten to fifteen times and switch legs. Do three sets of this per foot. Within a few days there will be a reduction in pain levels. You have to remember that this is coming from a muscular imbalance that will return when these exercises are stopped. It is much easier to do and safer than getting an injection into the foot.

  17. QUESTION:
    do you wear a brace with plantar fasciitis?
    my dad thinks i have plantar fasciitis. im in the middle of travel basketball, and i was wondering, do u wear some type of brace while exercising? do u wear it while u sleep?

    • ANSWER:

  18. QUESTION:
    Question about plantar fasciitis?
    I have had plantar fasciitis for 7 months and I still have no improvement. I have tried everything! Is it best to rest or continue with the exercises? Am I doing damage by stretching or even normal day to day walking? I have seen specialists and given conflicting advice. I am so fed up now and don't know what to do anymore.

    • ANSWER:

  19. QUESTION:
    Plantar Fasciitis?
    I'm not sure if I have it. All I know is I have tenderness in my left heel. Worse in the morning. I don't feel like a knife is sticking into my foot. I do my aerobics just fine... then an hour or two later, my foot is more tender. It is just slightly more bloated than my other foot (swelling maybe)?

    Question... do you think I have Plantar Fasciitis?

    If so, what do you recommend I do to treat it?

    Not exercising is not an option. I just changed my shoes and have been doing more lifting and less cardio (jumping etc). Any advice on this?

    What will happen if I continue exercising as usual? I am assuming the problem was my shoes and I have changed them. I have heard that it should heal on its own within a year. Am I good to go with exercise then? I can tolerate the discomfort afterwards... as long as I know I'm not doing any permanent damage.

    • ANSWER:
      Be careful... Not taking care of this can lead to a long painful recovery later on See the doc Do the proper exercises and observe the restrictions or "not exercising not being an option" may suddenly no longer be an option.

      read on below:

      d: Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain for which professional care is sought. A variety of terms have been used to describe it including jogger's heel, tennis heel, Policeman's heel, and an outdated term, gonorrheal heel reflecting the old thought that it was somehow related to that sexually transmitted disease.

      Pathophysiology: The plantar fascia originates on the medial tubercle of the calcaneus and fans out over the bottom of the foot to insert onto the proximal phalanges and the flexor tendon sheaths. It forms the longitudinal arch of the foot and functions as a shock-absorber as well an arch support. The term fasciitis may be somewhat of a misnomer since the disease is actually a degenerative process with or without inflammatory changes, which may include fibroblastic proliferation. This has been proven from biopsies of fascia from people undergoing surgery for plantar fascia release. It is commonly believed to be caused by repetitive microtrauma to the fascia.

      Frequency:

      * In the US: Plantar fasciitis accounts for about 10% of runner-related injuries and 11-15% of all foot symptoms requiring professional care. It is thought to occur in 10% of the general population as well. It may present bilaterally in a third of cases.

      Mortality/Morbidity: Plantar fascitis probably may lead to significant morbidity placing strict activity limitations on the patient. In addition, due to the pain in the foot leading to changes in patterns of bearing weight, associated additional injury to the hip and knee joints may also occur.

      Race: Race and ethnicity play no role in the incidence of plantar fasciitis.

      Sex: The condition occurs equally in both sexes in young people. Some studies show a peak incidence may occur in women aged 40-60 years.

      Age: The condition can occur at any age. As mentioned, a peak incidence may occur in women aged 40-60 years.

      CLINICAL Section 3 of 11 Click here to go to the previous section in this topic Click here to go to the top of this page Click here to go to the next section in this topic
      Author Information Introduction Clinical Differentials Workup Treatment Medication Follow-up Miscellaneous Pictures Bibliography

      History:

      * The patient reports inferior heel pain with the first few steps taken in the morning or after other long periods of nonweightbearing.

      * A limp may be present, and patients may prefer to walk on their toes.

      * Initially, the pain decreases with ambulation but then increases throughout the day as activity increases. Pain is worsened by walking barefoot on hard surfaces or by walking up stairs.

      * Associated paresthesias, nocturnal pain, or systemic symptoms should raise suspicion of other causes of heel pain (ie, neoplastic, infectious, neurologic causes).

      * Patients may report that before the onset of pain, they had increased the amount or intensity of activity including, but not limited to, running or walking. They may have also started exercising on a different type of surface, or they may have recently changed footwear.

      Physical:

      * The patient may have tenderness upon palpation of the anteromedial aspect of the heel.

      * Ankle dorsiflexion may be limited due to tightness of the Achilles tendon.

      * Pain may be exacerbated by passive dorsiflexion of the toes or by having the patient stand on his or her toes.

      Causes:

      * The cause of plantar fasciitis is unclear and may be multifactorial. Because of the high incidence in runners, it is best postulated to be caused by repetitive microtrauma. Possible risk factors include obesity, occupations requiring prolonged standing, heel spurs, pes planus (excessive pronation of the foot), and reduced dorsiflexion of the ankle.

  20. QUESTION:
    Heel Pain & Plantar fasciitis?
    About 3 years ago, I took a plane ride and was jammed in a small seat with my heels pressed hard against the floor for an extended period of time. I got a small amount of pain in each heel. I then went to the gym and ran on a treadmill and the pain suddenly became really sharp and bad, I had to stop running immediately and had to limp home.

    After several weeks of not being able to walk when I first woke up, I started doing research and discovered I had plantar fasciitis. I went to a foot doctor, who gave me some stretching exercise, and told me to buy arch supports for my shoes which I wear all the time. He also gave me a boot to wear in my sleep, but I cannot sleep with this so I have never won it. I stretch pretty frequently, and exercise now on an elliptical instead of running on the treadmill. My foot pain is almost all gone, but is still there. Its manageable, but I would like to eliminate it completely.

    Is this something that typically stays forever, or should it go away eventually? Can anyone think of anything more I can do to help the process?

    • ANSWER:
      Perceptive's answer is good, but not good enough because it doesn't address your plantar fasciiitis (PF). PF is a specific problem, and as long as you don't keep gently stretching your fascia at night, you're just delaying your recovery, because you're regressing each night, even as you may do the exercises by day. Why are you not wearing your PF splint at night? I know it's a hassle, but it's worth it, and it's my guess that it's going to be the factor in getting you finally over your PF.

      Have you spoken to your doctor who prescribed your PF splint? There are different types of splints..maybe if the one your doc prescribed for you isn't workable, s/he might be able to prescribe another type.

      It sounds like you are probably flat footed (?) since PF usually strikes those with one extreme or the other, flat feet or high arches. As long as you continue to put the incorrect stress on your fascia, because it reduces the pounding effect of running, but it sounds like it's not enough for you to heal completely. Doing an elliptical was a great idea, but apparently for your own situation just not enough of a change. How about finding a different form of exercise, like swimming, which you can focus on for awhile, while your PF heals? Swimming is great aerobic exercise. Although swimming doesn't provide you with the bone-building impact you get with running, it is a good alternative in the meantime, I think. You won't be able to get over your PF problems until you give your fascia a suitable and long enough rest, combined with gentle stretching--otherwise, in effect, you will just keep reinjuring your old injury every day as you keep on with your old behavior.

      Do yourself a favor, go back to your doc and tell him/her that you just haven't healed, and ask him/her what you need to do to get OVER this. IF your pf night splint isn't working, ask for another one.

      Good luck!

  21. QUESTION:
    Massage techniques for Plantar Fasciitis??
    I've had Plantar Fasciitis for over a year now, almost two years, and have tried stretching and good shoes, and so on, but am wondering if maybe there's some kind of massage or other exercise, either with muscles or energy, I can do to help speed the healing. Please let me know if you know of anything.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Longitudinal stripping methods applied to the bottom surface of the foot will help reduce tension in the intrinsic flexor muscles. It will also maintain better tone in those tissues. Some practitioners advocate performing most of the longitudinal stripping methods toward the calcaneus in order not to create additional tensile stress on the plantar fascia.
      Deep transverse friction may be used directly on the plantar fascia to stimulate fibroblast activity and tissue healing from chronic overuse. However, caution should be used in applying friction massage near the attachment on the calcaneus because of the possibility of a bone spur. Since the practitioner will not know whether a bone spur is present, it is best to assume that one might be there. The client’s pain will generally be a good guide as to how much pressure may be used with various massage techniques. Pressure that is too painful for the client should not be used. Working on the lower leg muscles, especially those involved in plantar flexion, is also important in addressing plantar fasciitis. Tightness in these muscles may contribute to excess tension in the fascial continuities running from the leg through the bottom surface of the foot. Massage of the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis posterior should be included. Various broadening and lengthening techniques applied to the posterior calf muscles will be particularly helpful. Compressive effleurage, broad longitudinal stripping, and broadening techniques done with the palm are all beneficial for this purpose. Addressing these muscles will help the effectiveness of a tension night splint as well. You should also massage muscles of the entire lower extremity when addressing plantar fasciitis. Biomechanical compensation may be occurring as a result of foot pain, the effects of which may not be limited to the lower extremity. The practitioner is encouraged to watch for soft-tissue effects throughout the rest of the body. Stretching the gastrocnemius and soleus, as well as all of the other tissues of the plantar flexor "sling," will be important. Stretching is most beneficial when performed several times a day. The morning is especially effective as this is when the plantar fascia has been in a non-weight-bearing position all night. The classic "wall stretch" position (see Figure 2) is a good choice for these tissues. Pulling the toes into hyperextension as the foot is pulled in dorsiflexion works well in stretching these tissues. Plantar fasciitis is a condition that affects a large percentage of the population; thus, massage therapists are frequently presented with this condition in their practices. Fundamental knowledge of foot biomechanics and the development of this pathological problem are essential for providing appropriate care. Some of the suggested treatment methods, such as orthotics or anti-inflammatory medications, necessitate treatment from other health professionals. Thus, it may require communication with these other professionals. As a massage therapist, you have a special and unique contribution to make in treating this problem. The better informed you are, the greater your session results will be.

  22. QUESTION:
    Is it really plantar fasciitis? How do I get rid of this heel pain?
    I heard that plantar fasciitis pain is at it's height early in the morning. My heel pain is the opposite. I am fine and sprightly in the morning, but as the day goes by I am limping from the pain. Sometimes, when I lie down to sleep, it hurts so much, it brings tears to my eyes.
    If it's not plantar fasciitis, what the heck is it?

    I used to be very active, running 10ks, playing soccer, volleyball, dancing etc,.. but I had to stop almost completely because of this pain in the heel of my left foot. I was told by my doctor that it is plantar fasciitis and gave me a corticosteroid shot.
    It subsided for two months and then came back full force.
    I got another shot, and severely cut back to walking only a 15 minute mile 3 times a week. It worked for 3 months, but it still hurts! I went in for another shot of relief, and didn't do any "unnecessary" activity.
    After a year of this pain, I have become 20 pounds heavier with unhealthy fat due to the side effects of the corticosteroid shots, and lack of exercise.
    I hate the unhealthy side effects, and would avoid getting another shot if there is a better alternative.

    The frustration is getting to me. I am losing hope, and getting heavier in an unhealthy way.
    Any help and advice is deeply appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Give your feet as much rest as possible for a week or so. Pain relievers can be used for comfort. Use that time to get proper-fitting shoes-that is, shoes with adequate arch supports and flexible soles. A one-quarter-inch (6mm) heel pad is a good idea. Some people need to wear only well padded shoes, such as running shoes. Lace the top two eyelets very firmly to take some tension off your ligaments. Try an orthotic device (obtained through a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon), especially if there is excessive pronation of the foot. Be very patient. This problem can take a year or more togo away. And good luck.

  23. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis has been bothering me for almost 2 years now and I'm at my wits end about what to do.?
    My plantar fasciitis started with both heels hurting, then it shifted to my right foot then my left foot. Well, the right foot is fine now but the left foot has not gotten better and has been bothering me for about 1.5 years and I'm tired of it. It rules my life now as far as what I can and cannot do exercise-wise. My fiance and I love to go backpacking, but I have to load up on NSAIDS to be able to do that. I'm on my feet all day at work so if I want to be comfortable on my feet, I cannot do step aerobics (which I love), long walks/hikes, or any other high intensity exercise. Even riding my bike makes my foot sore. I've been to two podiatrists and a chiropractic, had physical therapy, worn "the boot", rested it, iced it, had cortisone injections, wrapped it, etc. Nothing has lasted! Anyone have any words of wisdom for a sore soul? Thank you so much!

    • ANSWER:

  24. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis, ooh the pain, please help?
    My coworker is in pain with this condition, any advice on stretches or exercises?
    I am still trying to get him to go to his doctor.
    I've had this myself, and it is misery.

    • ANSWER:
      I have known several people with that condition.First is the custom inserts for the shoes, there are some over the counter inserts that work for a while. My brother had the works and after awhile they didn't work so the Dr told him to get a cheap tight pair of athletic shoes every month and it worked for him. He donated the shoes to the Goodwill and got a tax write off.

  25. QUESTION:
    Heel Spur(plantar fasciitis) Help!?
    I have all the symptoms of a heel spur "plantar fasciitis", Even the little sore on the bottom of my foot where the extra bone is growing.
    I'm wanting to talk to people with the same problem, & try to figure out how to manage it.
    I DO NOT have medical coverage unfortunately, so I'm going to have to do it purely on my own...Which is scary and I'm going through a lot of pain now, I cannot walk on my foot, I've been walking around on my tiptoes because it hurts so bad. I love to exercise, even though havent been doing it lately I think this is really going to hurt me emotional wise because I can't when I want to, sadly..I've also got a yr old I have to carry around and it kills me to do so! =( I'm a stay at home so lifting 30+lbs All day is something that I have to do..

    My grandfather had this, my aunt has this, now me...ehh..What great family, huh! ;-)

    Right now I'm wearing shoes all through the day to help with my arch, & thats about All I've done. I just figured this out last night, I'm just really worried. I always go barefooted and wore sandals 98% of the time, plus lifting my heavy son...So this is probably most of the cause thats for sure!
    Please help! email me at luvnnoah@yahoo.com if you'd like to help me figure out some sort of treatment I could do at home!

    Thanks so much!!
    It hasn't broken skin yet, I never thought about infection. Thanks for brining that up..
    Its just wore into my skin some, caused a round sore...But, like I said it hasnt completely broken into the skin yet...

    • ANSWER:
      Here is the deal if you truly have a spur. Assume a long sitting position with the knees kept straight. Have the muscles of the feet pull the front of the feet up towards the knees. You will know that it is working from a pulling or stretching sensation that will be present in the calf. Hold that pull for a few seconds and relax. Repeat that process five to ten times. This must be done before getting out of bed in the morning and right before going to sleep at night. Once you get the hang of doing the movement then you can do the exercise sitting, standing, or lying down. The more you do it the better. This next movement is harder but still easy. Squat down but keep the heels on the floor. You may need to hold onto something to maintain your balance but keep trying this until you are able to squat unassisted for thirty seconds. That should stop your plantar fasciitis problem.

  26. QUESTION:
    Can someone recommend best athletic shoes for someone with Plantar Fasciitis?
    I have Plantar Fasciitis in both feet. Bummers, I know. I am in dire need of the best recommendation for shoes for me to exercise. I attend a boot camp twice a week where the trainer knows of my condition so she accommodates me on certain exercises, but the shoes I have now are good ones, but just old (two years as of this summer). They were 0 so they were not cheap ones at all but I need somehting better, I think for my PF. New Balance has a slew of them for PF, but I bet someone can recommend something that is a sure-fire FIT for my condition.
    FYI: I'm LOOKING for suggestions for athletic shoes for someone with Plantar Fasciitis. I'M QUITE AWARE THAT SHOES WILL NOT CURE MY CONDITION. PLEASE REREAD THE QUESTION.

    • ANSWER:
      You are looking for shoes to get rid of a pain in your heel and it doesn't work that way. Sure you may get some relief but is that all you want in life? Why not get rid of the pain so you don't have to worry about the kind of shoes you wear? What you call the plantar facilities is due to your achilles tendon tightening up in your leg and that causes the muscle to be shorter and it ends up pulling on the end with the least amount of resistance, and that is your heel. Once you release the achilles tendon this pain will be gone. Here is how to release the achilles tendon:
      Achilles tendon:
      While sitting and your leg on your lap, take both thumbs and place them side by side at about ankle height on the tendon on the back of your leg and apply pressure hard and hold. After 30 seconds slowly raise your toes up as far as you can, release the pressure but hold your foot there for another 30 seconds.

  27. QUESTION:
    Plantar Fasciitis or Torn Plantar Fascia...Need Surgery?
    I was diagnosed about a year ago for having symptoms of Plantar Facitis problems. I am in the military and needed to do training, so I got a cortisone shot in my heel for the pain. It worked great for about 7 months, then the pain came back. I quickly got the shot again before deploying. This seemed to work good again. Then, 3 months later, while running on it, I felt a pop in my heel and then intense pain. I am deployed, so I could not stay off of it, but over time, it has got to where I can walk on it. There was also a small lump were my spring ligament is. Now it has been 5 months, and I still have a pain in my heel, the lump has gone down, but this limits the amount of walking, running, etc. that I can do. I had an X-Ray done (no bone spurs), but it showed nothing. I do stretches with an exercise band and wear an arching insole, but the pain is still pretty solid and is agitated by simply walking. What is suggested I do? I am deployed overseas and there is no MRI machine here, so if anything more is needed, I would have to leave to get anything done. What is suggested here or what might I have damaged that would result in that pop I had? I have no pain in my calf and most is in the back of my heel with some on the outside of my arch. I do have slighty flat feet. I hope this is enough information. I will check in on this thread if anymore questions are needed. Bottom line questions is: What is the chance I tore my plantar (?) and will require surgery when I get home..I know it's hard to diagnose this, but what do you think?

    • ANSWER:
      IF YOU HAVE PLANTAR FASCIITIS Get a Strassburg Sock. It stretches out your calf, achilles AND plantar fascia.

      It's about . I have had plantar for a year and did all the normal treatments with only partial success. It turns out that a NORMAL night splint wasn't working for me because my ankle/calf/achilles is flexible and I needed to pull my foot back 96 degrees to stretch out the plantar fascia. A regular Night splint only goes to 90 degrees so it didn't help.

      I've been using the Strassburg sock for 3 days -- no pain at all the last 3 mornings. If all goes well Ironman training starts this Saturday.

      If you tore your plantar it is unlikely that you would be walking.

  28. QUESTION:
    i think i have plantar fasciitis?
    i have a REALLY,REALLY bad pain in my heel, i have to live with it.
    i have had the pain for 18 months now. I walk a lot through the day and i go to high school.
    should i be concerned?
    i have been to the doctor twice and he said nothing really, just exercise it but my heel kills.
    i hardly wear any high-heel foot ware so that shouldn't be the problem.
    can anyone give me any help or advice please??
    my foot really kills :(

    • ANSWER:
      Can you change your doctor? Can you go to a podiatrist? It sounds like you have the same problem as mine - Plantar Fasciitis. Plantar Fasciitis has a strong connection with spending long time on your feet every day!
      I am dealing with plantar fasciitis for more than a year now and I understood that treatment efficiency is very individual. If something works for one it may not work for the other. There are many treatment techniques that you can try. Did you try Taping? I have found it very useful. Read the article in the following link - (http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/96375/duct_tape_cured_my_plantar_fasciitis.html?cat=50) There are a few Taping techniques you can find in YouTube - just type "Plantar Fasciitis Taping" in YouTube search.
      I have also found a very informative website in:
      http://www.plantar-fasciitis-elrofeet.com
      Take care & Good luck

  29. QUESTION:
    What is Plantar Fasciitis?
    I am happy to see there is information about this condition and that others can relate. I was just diagnosed with Plantar Fasciitis and have dealt with this pain now for a while. I was afraid I was loosing my arch and also started using different types of arch support and insole inserts. I am taking Naproxen and doing stretching exercises but I appreciate any further comments on this condition. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic429.htm

  30. QUESTION:
    Intervertebral discs only function is to hold the vertebrae together.?
    true or false

    2- Flexion is caused by what motion?

    A.
    sitting
    B.
    bending forward
    C.
    bending backward
    D.
    reaching

    3- The plantar fascia is a component of arch support in the foot.

    true or false

    4- Exercise cannot help treat plantar fasciitis

    true or false

    5-Problems in the foot can cause injuries in other areas.

    true or false

    6- Without ground reaction force we would not be able to jump as high.

    true or false

    7- "In order to be diagnosed with a tear, the tendon of the muscle must tear completely"

    true or false

    8- The grading systems helps to determine the term that can be used to describe the tear.

    true or false

    9- The rotator cuff is solely responsible when a tear occurs.

    true or false

    10- Which muscle is found between the rib cage and the scapula?

    A.
    supraspinatus
    B.
    infraspinatus
    C.
    teres minor
    D.
    subscapularis

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes diet and exercise just is not enough, cos there will be excess weight just sitting around in the colon. It's not body fat, therefore it can not be melted off, however it will be flushed out, just by using a supplement. http://jawock.mydreamdiet.info has a risk free offer available at the moment, I tried it and melted away 17 lbs!! Who says there's no magic bullet? LOL!!!

  31. QUESTION:
    Which Exercise Program for someone with knee pain?
    So, I want to lose weight. Who doesn't, right? I am 28 years old. I have recently lost 15 pounds *takes a bow*, but I still weight 206 lbs. I would like to start an exercise program, but I'm not sure how to go about choosing one. I have plantar fasciitis (I think, I'm pretty sure), and my left knee hurts about 90% of the time. I'm a nurse, so I don't go to the doctor *grins.* I'm not sure what's wrong with my knee, but chances are, they are gonna tell me to lose weight. Duh. Anyhow, I was wondering if anyone could suggest, I guess, a low-impact exercise program? Something that will go easy on both my knee and my feet. Other than all that pain and fat (which probably caused the pain), I'm in good health. No health problems at all, and my blood pressure and other lab values are fine. It's been 10 years since I did any sort of regular exercising (don't judge me), and before you say swimming, that's not really an option for me where I live. So. All that said, I'm all ears. Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      But I wanted to say swimming - well that is what I do with my plantar fasciitis. you can also ride a bicycle - I do that too.

  32. QUESTION:
    Returning to fitness after injury/sedentary period: how many days a week should you exercise?
    In the recent past, I've had plantar fasciitis and a calf tear. I'm up for 5 days/week of exercise (jogging x3, strengthx2, alternate days) but am worried about reinvigorating these injuries. I've got the right shoes, am starting with only 30 mins at a time.

    Re jogging - I'm doing the couch25k programme, and am trying to pay attention to form (short strides, landing softly on balls of feet). Am in the second week of this.

    The strength workout is a bodyweight programme - just started it up again after 2 months off (bronchitis). Am in first week of this, and do calf raises and stretches.

    What I DON'T want to do is be interrupted by some other stupidly annoying hiccup - for once, I'd like to see progress.

    Should I limit myself to 3 days this week (2 cardio, 1 strength), and slowly build to 5? Or just go for broke (which is what my butt needs)?

    • ANSWER:
      You can take some cardio every day but you need to have breaks in resistance work. Just increase what you do each day gradually.

  33. QUESTION:
    How long can I expect to have my foot problem?
    I have been diagnosed by my GP as having plantar fasciitis in my right foot. She was a bit vague with the prognosis. At the time, I couldn't think whether I had done anything to cause it but then i remember I tripped down a step which I presume would have started it off.
    Does anyone know how long it is likely to last? I have been doing stretching exercises and resting it as much as I can but it does not seem to have improved as yet.

    • ANSWER:
      a problem like plantar fascitis takes a long time to heal... use hot fomentation ... will hep improve the blood flow and heal it faster... it would take few months before you get back to normal... proper rest to the foot is important...

  34. QUESTION:
    Question about water aerobics?
    My affliction with plantar fasciitis has caused me to seek alternate forms of exercise.Does water aerobics burn calories?What are it's other benefits?What equipment is needed for optimum results?Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Any type of exercise in water is superb. The water acts as a natural resistance, so your movement is good for muscles in addition to cardio. Also, the "lift" provided by the water serves to protect joints from too much wear and tear. No equipment is necessary, but to add to a water workout use dumbells specifically designed for water use or even just one of those styrofoam noodles to increase the resistance of the water. Also, if you have any tendency to blistering/irritation on the soles of your feet you might want to consider shoes for the water since moving around the bottom of the pool can cause irritation for some.

  35. QUESTION:
    Really bad heel pain!! What can I do?
    I am 42 years old and I have started to have really bad heel pain. I know that it is probably plantar fasciitis because I have read about the symptoms and they fit me to a "t". I would like to know of any good home remedies, exercises, or over the counter medications that may help me with this pain. I am a teacher and on my feet a lot. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Stretching can help. Stand facing a wall. Place the ball of one foot up high on the wall and your heel on the floor. Now move closer to the wall stretching your calf muscles. Here's another-With tennis shoes on stand on the 1st step on a stair case with only the balls of your feet touching and your heels hanging down as far as they can stretching your calf. Raise up standing on your toes and go back down. Do 3 sets of 20. Also try squeezing the sides of the heel of your foot and soaking it in Epsom salt and water as hot as you can stand. Get shoes that are more comfortable and with a softer sole/insert. Look into ways you can plan your day teaching with less time on your feet. I know the exercises help the calf mostly but they helped me when I had the same problem. Good luck.

  36. QUESTION:
    Foot pain while exercising...shoes/no shoes?
    So, I've checked out previous arch pain questions and no, I don't think I have plantar fasciitis. I don't have pain in the morning, they don't feel tight, etc. But I do have overwhelming pain in the arches of my feet while exercising. I recently started getting serious and (as much as I can) trying to do 30 min of in-home exercise a night (stationary bike, wii fit, exercise videos, etc.). I'm not technically overweight (my BMI is high-average), so I don't think I'm overstressing my feet...I'd just like to get back to a certain size for which I own some neat duds ;) I did a belly-dancing video barefoot (thats what they called for...and I've done a class and you're supposed to do it that way, but it just killed my arches). On wii fit you're not supposed to wear shoes on the balance board, but the running (not on the board), step aerobics, and "bicycling" absolutely kill my arches. I LOVE Zumba and that's the only video I've been able to do comfortably, but the last two tries I've had to take breaks and today stop the video because it was killing my arches. (If I go and ride my exercise bike though, it feels better after a while). I tried a Billy Blanks Boot Camp Tai Bo thing, but that killed my thighs (different story there!!!). Ugh. Should I just take a few days off...will that make whatever is bothering me go away so I can restart my "training"? Or, did I screw something up and need to go to the doctor? Should I wear shoes, or not? What does everyone else do?

    My question is...sounds like the orthotic insoles are the way to go, but what about activities with no shoes? I tried my Zumba video with and without shoes and some moves were better with shoes/some without.

    • ANSWER:
      Are your arches of normal height? Wet your feet and leave prints on a visible surface. Ideally, 1/4 of your foot ought to appear. If half or more of it does, your feet are flat and it would explain the foot pain.

  37. QUESTION:
    I have a medical mystery. Maybe someone can help me find the answer?
    I will try to keep this under 3000 words!
    One morning in November of 2003, I got out of bed and felt like I had stepped on a tack. My heel hurt so much. I know you are all thinking Plantar Fasciitis now, right? So were my 3 doctors. I went from referral to referral from conservative treatments to surgery and the pain only ever intensified and expanded.
    I started with tape and general orthopedics, ice, and stretching exercises, and then prednisone tablets and cortisone injections, then custom molded orthopedics, then tens units and some thing where they put my foot in a container of water and shocked the water. I then was prescribed special shoes, night splints, contniued shots/prednisone, finally had shockwave therapy in 2005 and after 2 more years of treatment, I had plantar fasciotomy surgery in 2007. The entire time, I kept complaining that my left heel hurt too, but the doctors never evaluated it. They said it was just compensation pain.

    After the surgery, at the 3 day mark, when I went back for a recheck and the doctor told me I would be walking normally, if not uncomfortably, I told him the pain was unimaginable.

    To keep a long story short, the pain intensified and began shooting out of my foot and up my leg. Same thing in my left foot. It got to the point where I could not walk. At all. I had 3 MRI's done and then a nerve conduction test. The MRIs revealed no signs of plantar fasciitis in either foot, but showed a prolasped disc in my back.. The nerve conduction test reflected an impingement of two nerves at the L5-S1 vertebral column. I was thus sent to a back surgeon for the possiblity of having spinal surgery. Back surgeon said the nerve conduction test was wrong and there was no impingement on my back and the disc that was pushed out was not severe or terribly abnormal or compromising my back in anyway, he referred to the MRI for this.

    This was all up to Aug of 2008. I got sick and tired of it, and just stopped going to doctors all together. In Sept 2008, I started swimming. 5 years of battling this pain in my legs had led to weight gain and I wanted exercise that I could handle. Within 2 weeks of swimming, the pain 95% resolved. It is now February and the pain is about 50% back. I have not been swimming in the last 2 months because of the cold winter. I have been using an exercise bike instead. Both of my heels/arches/toes are in mild pain, the pain shoots up my legs into my knees and goes as high as my butt in my right leg and I get this very sharp pain shooting out horizontally from my lower back sometimes, like a spasm.

    So, if you're still here after reading this book... what on earth else can this be?? Why can I not get a diagnosis, and most of all, a cure? Any suggestions?
    Guess I forgot to mention, I had been to 2 chiros and crunched and broken. I have never done accupuncture because I am terrified of needles. The nerve conduction was bad enough!

    I also have had a parasitology panel done, because I used to work around animals all day every day and the possibility of me inhaling/ingesting a parasite/spore existed. That was negative.

    I also have had general bloodwork done to rule out any type of kidney/liver or vitamin definciency involvement, and while I have never been seen by a herbologist, I have tried some Eastern medicine, a few pain relieving herbs with no success.

    • ANSWER:
      I really have no idea, especially considering the fact that you seem to be relieved of the pain when you swim, which would lead me to believe that the problem is muscular or something. But, I thought I'd make a couple suggestions:

      First, have you been to a chiropractor? Maybe it's a back problem that for some reason wasn't detected. The chiropractor might be able to help, since they normally have somewhat unconventional methods.

      My next suggestion is that you go to a much more unconventional doctor. This sounds strange, but I knew of a girl who suffered from severe pain in her arms and legs for about a year, and no one could figure out what was wrong. She went to some sort of herbal doctor or something (I'd suggest google) and discoverred that she had a tapeworm-like parasite that was slowly eating through her muscle. I dont think this is what you have because you felt some relief when swimming, and I can't imagine that would help this situation, but it seems that you been through every single possible conventional medical option you have... why not try something less conventional?

      On a related note, I would second the first commentor's acupuncture suggestion.

      Normally I don't put much weight in unconventional methods, but in your case, it seems that's the only thing you haven't tried.

      Good luck!

  38. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried ALLI? Does it work/how/how well?
    My hubby & I are both thinking of trying Alli - I just wanted other comments.

    In Sept. 07, hubby was weighing in at a whopping 335. Today he weighs 320, so he's happy about that, but his goal over this full year is to get to 260 or less. In Sept. 07, I was weighing a terrible, plump 195. I now weigh 172.

    He can't currently exercise due to some ankle arthritis, and I can barely walk due to severe foot problems from plantar fasciitis. So we both need something a little more to help us out with our current healhty eating plan. We are losing weight, just looking for a little more, and wondering how & how well ALLI actually works?

    Thanks,

    • ANSWER:
      alli does work and I've lost 20 pounds using it so far. I kept hearing about the negative side effects, but they only happen if you take alli when you have had something very high in fat, like a large chili cheee fries. If you are already on a normal or restricted calorie diet, you really won't have bad side effects.

      I think it is very safe and it keeps you honest on your diet. Its perfect for those who have reached a plateau in their weight loss and thats where I was. Once I started taking the alli, the pounds started coming off. Good luck.

  39. QUESTION:
    Help on Health Test Final?! Worth a lot, Please?
    Please Help me? Can you choose the right answers? Thank you to anyone who helps me.

    30. Body weight that is inconsistent with age, build, and height (usually 15% below normal weight) is a symptom of: (1 point)
    anorexia nervosa
    bulimia nervosa
    binge eating
    osteoporosis
    31. _______ is the pain or discomfort often felt 24 to 74 hours after exercising. (1 point)
    DOMS
    Muscle sprains
    Muscle strains
    Overuse injury
    32. ________ are the result ofan injury to a ligament. (1 point)
    DOMS
    Muscle sprain
    Muscle strain
    Overuse injury
    33. _________are the result of an injury to either a muscle or a tendon. (1 point)
    DOMS
    Muscle sprains
    Muscle strains
    Overuse injury
    34. The treatment plan for immediate relief of muscle strains and sprains is: (1 point)
    RAISE
    RICE
    REM
    none of the above
    35. _________ is a system of natural medicine, founded in the late 1700’s by Samuel Hahnemann, involving the use of natural plant, mineral, and animal substances. (1 point)
    Homeopathy
    Acupuncture
    Ultrasound therapy
    Pilates
    36. ________ is a disease where there is a loss of bone density, causing the bones to become porous, soft, and weak. (1 point)
    Osteoporosis
    Osteoarthritis
    Arthritis
    All of the above
    37. It is important to recognize a person who needs first aid for choking, from someone who does not. (1 point)
    True
    False
    38. CPR stands for cardiopulmonary respiration. (1 point)
    True
    False
    39. The Heimlich maneuver was developed and introduced by Dr. Henry Heimlich, in 1974. (1 point)
    True
    False
    40. Abdominal muscles that run diagonally down the ribs and connect to the front top of pelvis and assist with trunk rotation: (1 point)
    external oblique’
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    41. Abdominal muscle which runs horizontally across the abdominal wall and underneath the internal and external obliques; assists with forced exhalation and trunk stabilization: (1 point)
    external obliques
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    42. An inflammation of the tissue under the foot (fascia) caused by overuse and improper athletic footwear. Characterized by intense “start-up” pain under the heel bone: (1 point)
    pronation
    plantar fasciitis
    osteoporosis
    osteoarthritis
    43. Personal and specific fitness objectives and plans are referred to as: (1 point)
    specific goals
    health issues
    fitness goals
    realistic goals
    44. Your exercise results will be better and you will be able to achieve you fitness goals if you change your routine every: (1 point)
    two to three weeks
    four to six weeks
    six months
    daily
    45. Many people prefer working out at a gym, and find that they can achieve their fitness goals more easily than working out at home. (1 point)
    True
    False
    46. A strong impulse to do something is called: (1 point)
    compulsive
    strategy
    impulsive
    habitual
    47. A set of actions to offset counterproductive behaviors: (1 point)
    motivations
    strategies
    behaviors
    changes
    48. Encouraging and teaching your family the importance of exercise and healthy diet is an important part of your own personal fitness program. (1 point)
    True
    False
    49. Most people that participate in physical fitness do not enjoy encouraging their family members to get involved with them. (1 point)
    True
    False
    50. A 5k marathon is: (1 point)
    a 3 mile running event
    a 6 mile running event
    a 23 mile running event
    a 26 mile running event

    • ANSWER:
      31. A
      34. B
      35. A
      37. T
      45. T
      46. C
      48. T
      49. F
      50. B

  40. QUESTION:
    Medical Question! Do you guys know what could be wrong with me?
    I have been really sick lately. Unexpectedly.
    I am a 21 year old female. I am a dancer and a runner.
    I eat healthy. I hate red meat and fried food.
    The only weakness I have is CHIPOTLE.

    Well I went to the doctor because of abnormal bleeding.
    It turns out I have anemia. Then I went again last week because my foot has been killing me, well I have plantar fasciitis. But he had my blood work results in and just briefly told me that I am at risk for heart disease already. My Triglyceride levels are over 500. He said to eat more fruits and veggies and cut down on the red meat and start exercising. After I got out of the office, after the initial shock, I realized...I don't eat unhealthy and I exercise ALL the time.
    Well, again, my body has been weird and my mom has had Ovarian Cancer. I looked up the symptoms and I have all of them. I am not a hypochondriac but it said if you do have these, you should tell your doctor.
    My question is, how likely do you think it is that I have the beginning stages of Ovarian Cancer? Don't let me being 21 fool you, I am stuck in an 80 year old's body.

    • ANSWER:
      Increased cholesterol levels can be genetic/inherited, and be frustratingly resistant to dietary and exercise changes. For these people, medications are the only answer.
      For such a young person, I would hope your doc is going to suggest further testing; your levels are quite high.
      I'm not sure where you get the Ovarian cancer link?? Oh, were you having abnormal vaginal bleeding?
      Clearly you need to to either work with your doc on this, or find another one who is willing to work with you on this.

  41. QUESTION:
    How about some tips for hardgainers?
    I know what every hardgainer's nightmarish experience must be like because I am one. I'm an 18 year old male and I'm 5'11" and a wimpy 130 lbs. Before I took weight gain seriously or before I cared about my body, I was a frail 5'10" and 114 lbs, and that was only 2 years ago. Even my doctor suggested I had to gain weight because of my unhealthy looks. But don't get me wrong...before that I ate just like a normal person should...3 meals a day plus dessert. I just had and still have a lightspeed fast metabolism.

    Since then I've tried numerous things such as adding a milkshake to my every day diet and doing crossfit. I'm built like a runner, but I've had numerous injuries running cross country in the past like hernia-like abdominal pain and plantar fasciitis, so I don't know what other advantages stand for my body type. I think one of the biggest challenges to being this body type is that it's extremely hard to get out of, and genetics lock my body from ever gaining a single ounce of muscle unless I train EXTREMELY hard.

    I'm built like my mom: skinny and long arms and legs. But I've figured that genetics can't stop every type of method to gain weight and muscle. So I've also tried a program called crossfit and so far it's too early to tell if anything's been working (1 month) but I've been too skeptical that it may not be suited exactly for my body type. I've also been eating more frequently but less in each meal.

    So if you were a hardgainer or still are but making progress, or if you know a hardgainer, what have they been doing that has been successful with gaining muscle and weight? I need some tips to know if the road I'm going down is the right road. It would be great to know tips from a guy who used to have exactly the same traits as me. What works for a hardgainer and what doesn't? What exercises are exclusively for hardgainers and helps them build muscle fast? What about the diet?

    I've looked at things like skinny vinny's website but I don't want to risk getting a product that doesn't help. So I don't want product advertising on this page please. But anything or any exercise that costs little or none of my money at all and is extremely effective for people just like me would be great for me to know about. Thank you for your time :)

    • ANSWER:
      I started eating more... hardgainers typically claim they eat and eat without gaining but far too often they eat very little calories and thats exactly why they are skinny.. i calculated my calorie intake and was very shocked at how little i actually ate...

      i started doing Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe and did the GOMAD - Gallon of Milk a Day... and what happened the pounds and strength just shot through the roof

      so yeah... go buy some whole milk and drink a gallon a day for 2 months on top of your diet... do the Starting Strength programme and you will gain lotsa weight.. and then return to crossfit after that

      if you dont know Starting Strength im almost hundred percent sure they do at your crossfit gym Mark Rippetoe is a former powerlifter and teaches correct technique on the big lifts among others to Crossfitters and is known to pack on alot of weight on young athletes

  42. QUESTION:
    Help. Anyone know what this might be?
    I have been experiencing unusual symptoms and I don't know if it's because I'm recovering from heavy stress recently...

    It started with a funky tender spot on top of my right ankle. After a few days this progressed into numbness and tingling on my right foot, like it had gone to sleep. I massaged oil into it, wrapped it, and put it up for two days in bed and it became much better. I also started wearing shoes with a bit of a heel on it, and that helped, too (I'd been wearing flats for weeks, some without support).

    My right arm seems to have also joined the party. One night it "fell asleep", and when I woke up and moved it, it had the pins and needles sensation. I didn't think about it much but whenever I wake up it seems to have some weakness issues.

    Now the pains are gone but I feel trembly -- I can see my finger shake when I would be pointing something and I am leaning on the arm at the same time. My right ring finger seems to be suffering the most ... when I hold my whole hand up in the air, it's the one that's visibly (and lightly) trembling.

    Some backgrounder: I had a slipped disc on my lower right lumbar area several years ago, and I currently have a pelvic inflammation that's yet to be treated. Also had shingles on my left arm last year. Furthermore, I had plantar fasciitis until about three years back, when I lost weight. Because of the heavy stress I had (as I mentioned in the beginning), I now weigh 160lbs at my height of 5'8", and I stopped all exercise for two months now (I used to be very active: yoga, pilates, tennis, running, walking).

    Could these things be connected in any way? Prolonged standing and sitting make my leg symptoms worse. I feel like my right arm is weak, but there is no physical proof of that (I can still carry stuff using my right arm) although I'm gentler on it than usual.

    Anyone have any idea what this might be? Should I be alarmed? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      yeap u are recovering from heavy stress recently.

  43. QUESTION:
    please help me with these questions?
    36. ________ is a disease where there is a loss of bone density, causing the bones to become porous, soft, and weak. (1 point)
    Osteoporosis
    Osteoarthritis
    Arthritis
    All of the above
    37. It is important to recognize a person who needs first aid for choking, from someone who does not. (1 point)
    True
    False
    38. CPR stands for cardiopulmonary respiration. (1 point)
    True
    False
    39. The Heimlich maneuver was developed and introduced by Dr. Henry Heimlich, in 1974. (1 point)
    True
    False
    40. Abdominal muscles that run diagonally down the ribs and connect to the front top of pelvis and assist with trunk rotation: (1 point)
    external oblique’
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    41. Abdominal muscle which runs horizontally across the abdominal wall and underneath the internal and external obliques; assists with forced exhalation and trunk stabilization: (1 point)
    external obliques
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    42. An inflammation of the tissue under the foot (fascia) caused by overuse and improper athletic footwear. Characterized by intense “start-up” pain under the heel bone: (1 point)
    pronation
    plantar fasciitis
    osteoporosis
    osteoarthritis
    43. Personal and specific fitness objectives and plans are referred to as: (1 point)
    specific goals
    health issues
    fitness goals
    realistic goals
    44. Your exercise results will be better and you will be able to achieve you fitness goals if you change your routine every: (1 point)
    two to three weeks
    four to six weeks
    six months
    daily
    45. Many people prefer working out at a gym, and find that they can achieve their fitness goals more easily than working out at home. (1 point)
    True
    False
    46. A strong impulse to do something is called: (1 point)
    compulsive
    strategy
    impulsive
    habitual
    47. A set of actions to offset counterproductive behaviors: (1 point)
    motivations
    strategies
    behaviors
    changes

    • ANSWER:
      1.osteoporosis-loss of bone
      2. true
      3. CPR-true
      43. Fitness goals
      46. impulsive
      47. strategies

      Good luck on your quiz.

  44. QUESTION:
    Help me please !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!?
    39. The Heimlich maneuver was developed and introduced by Dr. Henry Heimlich, in 1974.
    True
    False
    40. Abdominal muscles that run diagonally down the ribs and connect to the front top of pelvis and assist with trunk rotation:
    external oblique’
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    41. Abdominal muscle which runs horizontally across the abdominal wall and underneath the internal and external obliques; assists with forced exhalation and trunk stabilization:
    external obliques
    internal obliques
    rectus abdominus
    transverse abdominus
    42. An inflammation of the tissue under the foot (fascia) caused by overuse and improper athletic footwear. Characterized by intense “start-up” pain under the heel bone:
    pronation
    plantar fasciitis
    osteoporosis
    osteoarthritis
    43. Personal and specific fitness objectives and plans are referred to as:
    specific goals
    health issues
    fitness goals
    realistic goals
    44. Your exercise results will be better and you will be able to achieve you fitness goals if you change your routine every:
    two to three weeks
    four to six weeks
    six months
    daily

    • ANSWER:
      39. True
      40. external obliques
      41. Transverse Abdominus
      42. Plantar fascitis
      43.Fitness goals
      44. Four to six weeks

  45. QUESTION:
    How much stair climbing should I do to lose pounds on a 1200 calorie diet?
    (NOTE: When I say stair climbing I'm referring to climbing 2 flights of stairs in a house.)

    I keep a food journal, and I've found that I eat about 1200 calories a day. Online health journals have "recommended" that I eat 1500 - 2000 calories a day, but I usually just can't. Unfortunately, although I have a very healthy diet with mainly fish, veggies, rice, yogurt, and fruit (I'm an aspiring vegetarian) - I am consistently gaining more and more weight. I can't do high impact aerobics right now because of my plantar fasciitis, but stair climbing at home is a possibility. If I'm already gaining weight on a 1200 calorie diet, what can I do to lose about 40-50 lbs? I hate to drop my diet down in calories, as that may cause me to gain more. I stay away from sodas, junk food, alcohol, and I don't smoke. So how much stair climbing should I do to lose pounds on a 1200-1500 calorie diet? Is there a specific "stair climbing method" that would maximize my alloted exercise time?

    Thanks in advance!
    It was tough to choose a best answer for this one because all of you guys have been so helpful.

    Thanks everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      For me it all started with plantar fasciitis. The best cardio exercise for someone with plantar fasciitis is swimming and riding a bicycle. I think that stair climbing is not good for your heel pain at all (though I am not an expert). I used to run and I got plantar fasciitis so I started to swim and cycle. Today I’m better with my PF so I ended up as a triathlete. I have finished my first olympic triathlon race two months ago. As you can understand I did not start from zero. You can also try water aerobics or aqua jogging, Test-drive a rowing machine and a stationary bike. I think you should consult your doc to make sure I am right.
      There are many things you can do to treat your PF although I understood that treatment efficiency is very individual. If something works for one it will not necessarily work for the other.
      I have found taping very useful. Taping will keep your foot from getting injured again and will help you get through your daily routine and exercises.
      I found a very informative website in:
      http://www.plantar-fasciitis-elrofeet.com
      Take care & Good luck

  46. QUESTION:
    What's wrong with my foot? Arch pain and cramping?
    Ever since I was little, the arch in my right foot would ALWAYS hurt when I walked around a lot. Recently, it's been hurting even worse even when I don't walk a lot. It doesn't prevent me from walking or exercising, but it's still annoying. I thought it might be plantar fasciitis, but it's not THAT bad, so I haven't asked my parents to take me to the doctor.

    Also, I get foot cramps a LOT (in both feet). For a while, they were only occassionally and only when I point my feet. Recently, I've been getting them when I do almost anything. I'm a gymnast, so I need to point my toes a lot. I can't even point them well because I get a foot cramp! When I do splits, my back foot cramps up sooo badly. And sometimes, when I sit on my feet or make a sudden move, I get a foot cramp.

    Both of these problems are so annoying! I don't know why they're happening, but I really don't want my parents to waste money to take me to a doctor because it's not that serious. Why do you think this is happening? Thanks in advance! :)
    I'm 15, by the way. And just in case it helps, I don't have flat feet. It's possible I have high arches, but I'm not really sure what's considered high.
    Thanks everyone :) Frodo, here are some answers to your questions. Sorry it took me so long!
    1) The pain is like right where my heel ends and where the arch begins. Also, it's more painful on the inner side of my foot
    2) Yeah, it does hurt then also. But usually it's started by me walking a lot. It never really starts when I'm sitting.
    3) My arch type is definitely not flat. I think it's a little bit high.
    4) Usually, I wear clogs or Ugg boots in the winter, and flip flops in the summber.
    5) Sometimes. Occassionally I'll wake up and when I start walking, it hurts pretty bad. But then other times, I don't notice any pain.
    6) Nope, it's not sensitive to the touch.
    7) None that I've noticed.

    I hope these answers were helpful! Thanks again :)

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      First of all I am sorry to hear about your pain.

      Unfortunately, it is very difficult to determine what is exactly wrong, it could be an injury due to your gymnast activities or maybe it's pain related to growth.

      Here are some basic questions, If you can answer these then I will be able to give you a better diagnostic:

      1) Where is the pain located exactly (Is it more towards your heel)?
      2) Does it also hurt when you are not walking/standing?
      3) Determine your arch type - http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-240-319-326-7152-0,00.html
      4) What kind of shoes you usually wear?
      5) Do you have more pain after a night sleep?
      6) Is it sensitive to the touch/massage?
      7) Is there any redness or swelling visible?

      Because you are 15 years old then it can be growth related because there is a growth plate right at the back of your heel and it can be painful until it "closes" and it can affect your arches as well.

      Here are some suggestions for things you can do right now:

      * Avoid any excessive stress on your hurting feet whenever possible, I would take some additional time off for this (As hard as it may be).

      * Ice your feet/arches and calf muscles at least 4 times a day.

      * Stretch your foot and leg before getting out of bed in the morning and after sitting down for long periods of time - this is imperative, you must stretch those foot and leg muscles.

      * Massage the area - this will speed up blood circulation and help in the healing process.

      Again, if you can answer my questions above I will be able to help you further.

      You can write to me directly if you prefer, my email is in my profile.

      Good luck and feel better!

  47. QUESTION:
    Problems with both feet?
    I use to weight 350+ pounds and had issues with gout, but since then I've lost over 100 pounds and I'm more active and I took up walking and was doing 4 miles in an hour. When I tried to run a few of those laps my feet became very sore. I went to a foot doctor who claimed I had plantar fasciitis in which he gave me a shot of cortisone and some foot exercises to do. This is a year later and they still don't feel quite as good as before all the problems. I've gotten new shoes and been measured for them also. I had an issue in the spring where I was running in the yard with the dog and it was hurting, but all od a sudden I heard a popping and then a burning sensation. I thought I screwed up, but after a couple days it healed quickly and my feet felt better...it was like the bands under my feet were crossed or cramped and then aligned right....just guessing, if that can happen. I went to walk again last week like before and the same issues came up. This time if felt like a deep tissue bruise at the pad on my right foot where my toes meet my foot in the center. The next day my other foot became achy on the topside of the arch in front but below the ankle. Is this arthritis? I don't feel like going back to the foot doctor just so I can pay him to tell me nothing new and buy some more new shoes. I'm just really ready to get past this problem.....I'm on no medication now, so that can not be blamed. Thanks

    • ANSWER:

  48. QUESTION:
    How long until I know if the orthotics are working?
    I have just been fitted for a new pair of semi rigid orthotics from a great sports medicine facility.They are for bi-lateral plantar fasciitis that I have had for maybe four years on and off. The doctor said that I might also have some nerve entrapment issues. Both feet do tingle right at the very top of my medial arches and I have tinel's sign. He also said that sometimes plantar fasciitis 'swelling' causes the nerve to be compressed so we don't really know if I have tarsal tunnel or if it's the swelling the the fasciitis, at least not until we see how it goes with the orthotics. I have had a negative nerve conduction study.
    How long do you think I would need to wear the orthotics until I know if they are helping? It's been almost a week and there is still some bi-lateral pain yet it's a little less than I have experienced before. I also do stretching exercises and icing daily.
    I have seen three podiatrists and two orthopedic surgeons already!

    • ANSWER:
      It can take about 4 weeks to be able to tell if your feet will adjust. If you still notice the pain after about 4 weeks or so then they may need to be readjusted.

      If that still doesn't work I would recommend consulting a Podiatrist (a doctor that diagnoses and treats diseases, disorders and problems with the feet such as PF) for an additional opinion on your foot situation to see what they say.

  49. QUESTION:
    Question about physical therapy; prefer to ask a p.t. or other related professional....?
    I recently started physical therapy after being diagnosed with a herniated disc and after that, plantar fasciitis in my heel. I had a lumbar steroid injection, which really made me feel pretty good. I have had three sessions and do not notice any difference. In fact, relating to my back problem, it seems that some pain has reappeared. Do you think I should give it more time, or what? I have to take off from work to go to p.t. and hate to be wasting my time. Two different doctors have ordered therapy, a podiatrist for my foot and an orthopedic doctor for my back. I get ultrasound, cold pack, and exercises for my foot and exercises only for my back. Your opinions are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      It's not uncommon for the effects of the injection to wear off and sometimes a series of up to three injections is required in more severe cases. The next question I would need to ask you is what types of exercises are you doing in PT and what is the immediate result after doing the exercises and for how long does that last? You need to discuss with the therapist for sure... I can give you more details after hearing more. We don't want you to waste your time or therapy visits either...so effective communication with your provider is certainly important...your exercises may need to be changed.

      As far as the exercises for the low back...this and manual therapy are usually the best treatment options...ultrasound will do nothing for your back and cold packs only a temporary relief if at all.

  50. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to wear orthotics to the gym?
    I have extremely flat feet and have been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. My podiatrist has given me custom orthotics (insoles) and these have relieved my pain immensely. I can now walk without pain & want to join a gym to lose weight. My question is, is it ok to do high impact exercises with orthotics in? I don't want to damage my feet further. What exercises can I do and which should I avoid, if any?

    I know I should ask my podiatrist but my next appointment is weeks away and it would be nice to start working out soon.

    • ANSWER:
      Well like yourself, i am also a person in need of orthotics. Sometimes when i do heavy running (long distance) my soles would cramp up and have a pain there. However if it is quite light exercise, things like aerobics, orthothics would help you more, than not wearing them.