Halloween is a great fun night that is celebrated on 31st October. This festival is for children, men and women all. Thus if it is for all then why plus size women think they cannot dress up in Halloween costume. Halloween costumes do come for plus size women also and that too in all styles like for ordinary women. There are plenty of costume ideas of plus size dress for women.

It is a very wrong notion that large size women cannot attend Halloween. Why just because they are plus size? Is a festival mention that only middle or thin size people can enjoy it? No, then who are we decide it? Whatever your size is you are fully liable to enjoy Halloween. A great Halloween costume is not far from you. Go and grab it. Halloween is for everyone these days.

Halloween costumes decks all body sizes. The main mantra to wear them is to wear them in best advantage to your figure. Accept your figure and do not be ashamed of it. You have to dress up in such a way so as to make your figure asset for you. Costume you wear be confident in it. Also accessories and make up are important part of Halloween ensemble thus do not forget them. Apply make up in ghost style and wear wigs and hats to look authentic for Halloween party.


Plantar Fasciitis Doctors

Plantar Fasciitis Treatment Guide Review:

Plantar fasciitis or inflammation of the plantar fascia happens when the ligament suffers very small tears where it joins the heel bone, or along its length. With incorrect foot mechanics, over-utilization or the presence of other triggers, the force on the plantar fascia during walking and running and the shift of body weight from one foot to the other can draw the fascia from and lead to microscopic tears.

In this article i will give some tips and ticks for curing this condition, and also introduce you to this very great guide called Plantar Fasciitis Treatment Guide, that can teach you all you need to as to totally get rid of your Plantar Fasciitis.

As you might already know, Plantar Fasciitis is a very painful and stubborn condition. At its most extreme, serious cases of plantar fasciitis can result in ruptures in the ligament.

The first step is to stop the activity that caused the pain. The person should alter his or her activity or exercise routines to reduce stress on the plantar fascia ligament. You should rest your feet, keep the foot elevated and use ice repeatedly during the first part of treatment. Patients should try not to run or walk too much, instead try swimming or cycling. Regular activity should be increased slowly avoiding pain with each increased level. Common anti-inflammatory medications such as asprin may reduce discomfort, although patients must make sure they get medical advice prior to starting any medication.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis?
    i just found out this monday i have plantar fasciitis in boh my feet but i have probably had it for about three months. I play rep soccer so i am constantly on my feet, and when i run is when my feet hurt because of this. So far the last 3 months my feet have been pretty sore, but not bad. But these last 2 weeks (including this week) the pain has been so excruciating its been hard for me to continue with my soccer. my feet become sore after the simplest little run for like 2 minutes. and the pain becomes so bad i feel like i am going to break down and cry. For my plantar fasciitis my doctor recommended getting orthotics which i am going to do, but i havent got them yet so thats why my feet are in pain. i just really want to know why my feet are hurting so bad now even though ive had it so long and i was wondering if i could get some tips on how to prevent this pain or treat it.
    i also forgot to metion that the pain i feel is mainly in the arches of my feet so its super painful.

    • ANSWER:
      I have that and it was just killing me for about a year until I talked to our physical therapist at school (I am a special ed. teacher and am on my feet all day) She gave me a simple exercise to do several times a day and it worked like a charm. I was pain free within 2 days and now whenever I feel it starting back up, I do the exercise and it goes right away. What you do is lean up against a counter or wall with your arms straight and your good leg about a foot from the wall. -You might have to bend that leg a little…Take your bad foot and reach behind as far as you can and put it down straight on the floor with the heel touching the floor. You will feel a strong pull and maybe a little pain in your Achilles tendon at the back of your ankle. Keep the pressure on it for about a minute and relax, then do it several times. Do this whenever you have a few minutes during the day. You are stretching the tendon that connects to the heel that is causing the main pain and I swear it helped me a LOT.

  2. QUESTION:
    Plantar Fasciitis?!?!?
    I’m 12 And The Doctors Said I Had Plantar Fasciitis And That Was About Three Or Four Years Ago And Like Two Years Ago It Stopped Hurt After I Ran Walked Or Did Anything Like That But This Month It’s Been Killing Me! My Shins, Knees, And Heel Hurt Really Bad. I’m Not Sure If The Plantar Fasciitis Has Anything To Do With My Knees Or Shins But They Hurt So Bad And My Gym Teacher Makes Me RUN Not Walk Or Jog, Run 1 Mile Everyday So Is There Anything I Can’t Do For The Pain Other Then Take Meds.
    Oh Yeah I All Ready Know The Roll The Froze (Spelling!) Under Your Foot And Also The Prop Your Foot Up Agienst A Wall And Lunge Forward!

    • ANSWER:
      Tell your parents exactly what you’ve just said here and also ask to see a doctor.

  3. QUESTION:
    (Doctors only)Is plantar fasciitis linked to fybromyalsia?
    I have been in a great amount of unexplained pain and fatigue since I can remember. Every doctor I go to gives a blood test, and says there is nothing wrong. Last month,I had been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis as a stress injury, but all my other pains and aches still hinder withought any attention from the doctors. I am convinced that I have Fibromyalsia because all the symptoms associated with it I have expirianced. I have had MRIs, X-rays, and blood tests of every kind. Everyone but me has given up so PLEASE help me out

    • ANSWER:
      These two problems are not related although both can be quite painful. Fibromyalgia can not be diagnosed with blood tests or with xrays, MRI, and CT Scans. You can go see a rheumatologist since these are the specialist that typically diagnose this disorder. There are specific criteria that you will need to meet, but it is basically a diagnosis by ruling out all other possible causes for the pain such as arthritis. Most insurances do not require a referral to see a specialist any more, so just get all of you medical records and make an appointment. If you have insurance that does require a referral, then you need to ask you PCP. While this doctor can make the diagnosis, they typically do not manage the pain, but will refer you to a pain management doctor. These doctors will be able to create a pain management plan that is appropriate for your condition. Finding a doctor that will listen to you can be very hard sometimes, especially with something like this, since there are many doctors that do not believe this is actually a condition. They think that the pain is all in the patient’s head. You just need to keep searching until you find a doctor that believes you and that also believes that Fibromyalgia is a disease. Good Luck

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the best podiatrist or doctor for plantar fasciitis?
    I live in Alpharetta, GA, and I have severe PF. I went to orthopedic surgeon in April but things are still bad. Need recommendation if you can.

    • ANSWER:
      I cut down on daily minerals, and it dissipated. You may also be depositing minerals from diet or supplements.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have very bad plantar fasciitis, and the doctor out me in a walking cast. How long can I expect to wear it,?
    The doc is vague about it, but he says sometimes it can be up to three months.
    I forgot to mention that he also recommended that I use crutches until the next visit, two weeks from now.

    • ANSWER:
      It can depend on how bad is very bad for the plantar fasciitis. I do have the link to a couple of sites that might help you find even more information.

      The first is at: http://www.podiatrychannel.com

      The second is at: http://foothealth.about.com

  6. QUESTION:
    shin splints and plantar fasciitis in irish (dancers or doctors only please!!)?
    i have been irish dancing for almost 4 years and i am novice prizewinner, i am only 11 and i am suffering from shin splints and plantar fasiitis. i need to keep dancing but i dont know how to fix this? i would really like help from dancers more addvanced than me.. thx!

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not a dancer but I am a gymnast and we get shin splints too. The best solution is to take a little dixie paper cup and put water in it and freeze it. Then rip the paper down so the ice is showing and rub your shins with it.

  7. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis way worse after stretching and massaging.?
    I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis yesterday and my doctor gave me some anti-inflammatory and pain killers and told me to stretch it and massage it frequently.
    My foot is so much worse this morning than it has ever been. Why? And should it?

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis?
    alright, so I am 100% that I have plantar fasciitis. I went to the doc about 1 or 2 years ago, and he said from not stretching my foot or something, but ik that I have plantar fasciitis. and whenever I walk it hurts really bad! and I am going to go into the doctor again, and if I can’t walk into the doc room will they give me a boot? bcuz It really hurts, and I have to walk without like moving my leg I have to keep my leg in a L shape

    I wear sandals, and ik that I have to wear arch support, because I have a really flat foot

    • ANSWER:
      Penguin- IF you have plantar fasciitis, the following may help:
      Treatment of plantar fasciitis is with short-term rest and controlling the inflammation. Here are the steps patients should take in order to cure their plantar fasciitis:
      Rest
      Avoiding the precipitating activity; for example, take a few day off jogging or prolonged standing/walking. Just resting usually helps to eliminate the most severe pain, and will allow the inflammation to begin to cool down.

      Apply Ice Packs
      Icing will help to diminish some of the symptoms and control the heel pain. Icing is especially helpful after an acute exacerbation of symptoms.
      A great way to ice plantar fasciitis

      Exercises and stretches are designed to relax the tissues that surround the heel bone. Some simple exercises, performed in the morning and evening, often help patients feel better quickly.

      Anti-inflammatory medications help to both control pain and decrease inflammation. Over-the-counter medications are usually sufficient, but prescription options are also available.

      Shoe inserts are often the key to successful treatment of plantar fasciitis. The shoe inserts often permit patients to continue their routine activities without pain.

      Night splints are worn to keep the heel stretched out when you sleep. By doing so, the arch of the foot does not become contracted at night, and is hopefully not as painful in the morning.

      These modalities alone will cure the plantar fasciitis pain in most patients. Be forewarned that the symptoms will not resolve quickly. Most patients find relief within about three months, and over 90% within one year.

  9. QUESTION:
    Surgery for plantar fasciitis …doctor says I can go straight to work next day..is that really possible? How

    Orthotics have not helped….
    the meds worked…but I hear they are bad for the liver….
    I took the shot once, but I haven’t had another one…and the pain did come back….looks like surgery is the last resort.

    • ANSWER:
      Well i guess a doc should know cricket,my friend.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have all the symptoms of plantar fasciitis, BUT?
    I have all the symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis, but I don’t feel ANY pain in the morning or after resting.. Could my doctors be mistaken in his diagnosis?

    Is there any condition that FEELS like plantar fasciitis but isn’t? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    “earth” shoes with the negative heel for relief from plantar fasciitis pain?
    I’ve been dealing with heel pain due to plantar fasciitis and have done all the things suggested by the doctors, no relief. Heard that earth shoes with the negative heel have been worn and have given some pain relief. They are quite expensive and I’d like more information before I buy them.

    • ANSWER:
      Actually high heels are better as they force the weight to the ball of the foot. You may wish to tie you rfeet at night. Tie the toes/ballof foot to ypur calve or ankle so that the bottom of the foot is stretched backwards. Rolling pin on the bottom before you go to bed or are watching TV. Exercise the plantar fascia ligament whenever you are standing. Putting on makeup, on the phone, waiting in line. Up and down on your toes. Comfortable shoes are a must. Heel cushions too.

  12. QUESTION:
    Whats a great way to cure/help Plantar Fasciitis?
    I have read everything I could and came to what I beleieve I have is Plantar Fasciitis. I have not seen a doctor because I have read a lot of little things to help out with it such as stretching, night splints ect. But I was just wondering if anyone else has this or know of anything that works great to get you going besides the stretching? I work at a sit in job all day so when I get up and go at work it hurt so bad I can’t stand the thought of getting up again the rest of the day. I just need some advice. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Sadly, no.

      The stretches and “whatnot” are by far and away the most effective “non-DR” way to effectively cure/manage palantar fasciitis. Quite a sad realisation at that, considering most patients never get over the initial pain the stretching causes and thereby, cease to stretch, just making their problem worse.

      Your job isnt going to help you at all, and in all likely hood, you will need to see your Dr. if the pain contiues. In your question, you dont mention chronicity so i cant advise you on that. But, if its getting worse instead of better, stop being stubborn and go see a doctor. This is one of those “compounding worseness” type problems, as in, the worse you let it get, the worse it will continue to get.

      And yes, i did just make that term up, but it should describe the situation adequately.

      For non dr methods… a simple change to the proper footwear could be the most effective(stay away from heels!) and medicinally, over the counter “Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs” (NSAIDS) are your best bet. This is assuming you dont have erosive essophagitis, peptic ulcers, gastric bypass, or an allergy to them, or anything that falls within that general realm and applies to you. Note to self: Reading the back of the box helps lol. Motrin/ibuprofin(same thing) are the most common. I would reccomend taking 1000mg tylenol every 4hrs/16hrs(4x’s) with 800mg motrin every 6hrs/18hrs(3x’s daily.) Im not a doctor so dont quote me on those, but in my experience in the hosptial, thats the general rule of thumb and is QUITE effective at meteing out a medicinal can of whoop-ass to a plethora of general aches and pains as well. And yes, you can take both together without turning your liver and kidneys into prunes.

      Note however if you do use this method… you MUST STILL DO THE STRETCHES IF IT MANAGES THE PAIN!!!! Pain management is to FACILITATE the streching, and allow the eventual discontinuance of the medication. In my opinon, this would be the best way to go about it if you have “white coat syndrome” or the “i dont need no freakin whack quack dr” mentality.

      If this has been going on for awhile though, i would recommend seing a dr. He/she/it WILL recommend the streches, possibly get you referral to see a physical therapist, MAYBE the odd podiatrist depending on how jacked up your feet are, for specialized fit and footwear. Additionally, naprosyn(and all its variants) will generally be perscribed at this point as well. It falls into the same NSAID family as motrin but is much more potent. Just remember, with all NSAIDs, accumilation in the system is required for theraputic effect… ie you wont notice pain relief form an NSAID until the 3rd-4th dose generally.

      Quite common to hear people complain about how NSAIDS dont work when they only poped the first dose… now you know why.

      If the oral NSAIDs are ineffective… then you will probably get an injection of Kenalog(an actual steroid, glucocorticoid if you want to be specific) in the realm of about 40mg’s. This is VERY effective in the management of this type of pain and lasts for as many days as milligrams, tending to make it the prefered choice among chronic sufferers of this condition. Works wonders on eczema too. This medication does have a myriad of side effects to potentially be aware of, but your dr can go over those with you. The most notable are generally strange dreams, nightmares, restless sleep, head ache, sterile abcess at the point of injection, and blanching(whtening) of the skin. Occasional mood swings as well. Most of these can be managed by simply being ALERT and “slowing your roll” if necessary lol.

      The more concerning side effects tend to come with long term use of the roid, and so i will not go over them here.

      As for what happens after this step, i couldnt tell you, as this is the furthest i have gone in managing/assisting in managing with my patients and RARELY have seen a repeat customer with agressive use of phys therapy and the injection should it be required. In fact, ive only had to give the injection 3 times because, as initially stated, the streches are the most effective method and once physical therapy gets ahold of my patients… I generally dont see them again till they get something else!

      Hope that helps.

  13. QUESTION:
    Last year I got Plantar Fasciitis in both feet, now it is healed, but why do my feet still hurt?
    The doctor did MRI , and said Plantar Fasciitis has healed, but I have bone spurs on both heals.

    I cannot stand for long periods, or walk too far, without it hurting. My foot doctor says bone spurs would not cause them to still hurt????

    • ANSWER:
      Go to your doctor again and if he tries to just excuse you saying it’s not bad, tell him he doesn’t understand and don’t leave until he gets what your saying. Try painkillers if he prescribes them, and if it doesn’t work, talk to him again. If he can’t help you, find a new foot doctor, you don’t have to live with pain.

  14. QUESTION:
    Will plantar fasciitis eventually go away?
    I’ve gained weight, almost 20 pounds. I was also running about 5 days a week. Considering my height weight proportion, it isn’t an option whether I lose weight or not; I’m 5’9, 245lbs. I had been stomping the ground at a metal show and the next morning I felt pain. The pain continued every morning. I got x-rays and they came out fine. The doctor told me I had Plantar Fasciitis. Does this go away eventually?

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Plantar Fasciitis?
    My heels get really sore for what seems no reason and I’ve looked up some possible diagnosis’ and it seems the most plausible one is for Plantar Fasciitis. How can I know for sure without spending 2 hours waiting to see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Well unfortunately you’ll probably want to go to a podiatrist anyway. Even if you can decide for yourself that you have Plantar Faciitis you will want something to help take the pain away and that usually means orthotics.

      Does the pain also happen in the arch of your foot? If it is Plantar Faciitis it will most likely hurt there too.

      It’s a very simple diagnosis and you would save yourself a lot of trouble by just going to a doctor.

  16. QUESTION:
    Heel pain: does it sound like a heel spur or plantar fasciitis?
    My left heel has been hurting me for several months now. It progressed very slowly from something annoying to something that is almost crippling. It is the worst in the morning when I get out of bed, I can hardly walk and almost fall down from the pain, but the more I walk the better it feels. Even during the day if I sit for 5 mins then walk the pain the back. The pain has gotten much worse and I am going to the doctor next week. Does this sound like a heel spur or plantar fasciitis?

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar fascitis comes 1st then you get a heel spur. I imagine you have fascitis. Before you get out of bed in the morning, do calf stretches for a couple minutes before you get out of bed. It will help.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can ankle injuries cause plantar fasciitis?
    I have had numerous ankle injuries. One doctor speculated that in an attempt to protect my ankles I have caused my current problem of plantar fasciitis. Is there any relation?

    • ANSWER:
      adjusting your weight differently due to weak ankles can create different problems to your feet..did the doc give you a remedy for both?
      If not get a new doc.

  18. QUESTION:
    question about tap dancing and plantar fasciitis?
    Ok, so I started to learn how to tap dance, and it made my plantar fasciitis worse.I went to the foot doctor,and got orthotics, and stayed off the foot for 5 months.The pain is gone, and I would like to continue dancing. If I wear my orthotics in my tap shoes, can I resume dancing or are my tapping days over for good? I’m willing to do whatever it takes to practice good foot health. This is important, so please don’t answer if you are not sure.Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I had that kind of problem, I tap dance too, my teacher told me to stop dancing for a while, I did it but going to every class, just watching the girls was awful my feet were moving along, but when I got back to practice it was great and I was sure that my whole body was okay. I know it’s hard to stop but you’ll see in the end it’s cool to finally be able to start again. And you’re taping days are not over, I’m talking about my true story so believe it, it’s better to recover.

  19. QUESTION:
    I think I have Plantar Fasciitis, should I go to the Doctor?
    Every morning when I wake up and stand or walk my heels are in bad pain. Even if I sit for a few mins and try to walk my heels hurt. The pain goes away after a few mins, or if I stand on my tippy toes. Ive had this for going on a year. Should I go to the DR?

    • ANSWER:
      I disagree with the comments below. I am a Pedorthist (foot specialist) and it is more likely that you have PF. Heel spurs are more calcium deposits that form around bones near the calcaneus bone. The deposits come from a wound or damage to tendon/ligaments. Pain radiates with you are in a weight bearing position (i.e. standing) There is a great web site, www.360footcare.com, that is interactive. They have a Pedorthist (a foot specialist including diabetic foot care ) who interacts with customers. They have youtube videos and eventually they will offer weekly live broadcasting for customers. The Pedorhist will discuss a particular foot problem and then Customers will ask questions that the Pedorthist will answer on live broadcast and Twitter. You might want to check them out. I know that they are still getting their interactive tools up and running but until then you might send an email. Good luck

  20. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis cortisone injection?
    I just got the injection yesterday for both of my feet. It hurts pretty bad but that was expected. my doctor called it a steroid flair which is expected the day after the injection. How long does it take for the injection to take effect? And some people told me that plantar fasciitis is a forever thing. My doctor said it’ll go away though. I’m planning on serving in the military so I need to know.

    • ANSWER:
      I got a cortisone injection in my wrist a couple months ago… the pain got much worse within the days of the injection but then the pain got much better than it was before after 3 days or so. Cortisone does last a long time but beware that it only masks the pain, it doesn’t fix any problems. I don’t know anything about that foot condition but keep in mind the condition still exists even though the pain is gone. Also know that too many injections (especially in a short period of time) can cause tissue damage.

  21. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had Topaz Laser Surgery for chronic plantar fasciitis?
    I have had sever bilateral plantar fasciitis for several years now. I have tried everything (night splints, PT, stretching, PRP, cortisone, orthotics, acupuncture, anti-inflamatories, immobilization, natural enzymes, changes in diet…) My doctor has recommending Topaz Laser Surgery as a last effort before having release surgery. I was hoping to hear from someone who had it done.

    • ANSWER:
      I do not know. Sorry! : (

  22. QUESTION:
    What is Plantar Fasciitis?
    I suffer from extreme pain in my heels, especially in the morning. My doctor tells me that I have Plantar Fasciitis. Any tips on relieving the pain?

    • ANSWER:

  23. QUESTION:
    Have had no luck with Podiatrist for plantar fasciitis. What other kind of doctor should I see?

    • ANSWER:
      You may need to try another podiatrist for another opinion (depending on what happens with the other specialists I’m going to recommend), but another specialty you can try besides podiatry is that of an orthopedic surgeon or even a chiropractor to see what they might be able to do to help your plantar fasciitis.

  24. QUESTION:
    Should I consider corticosteroid shots for plantar fasciitis?
    I have been having arch pain in both feet for a couple of years. Recently, the pain seems to worsen due to my increased participation in running activities. I have tried the arch support prescribed by my doctor for approximately 1 month but the pain still does not go away. Currently, I am waiting for my appointment with a bone specialist as my previous doctor does not seem to know how to treat my condition and that she suspected that my condition is plantar fasciitis. I have also tried taking painkillers, and applying anti-inflammatory drugs on my painful site but all these does not seem to work. On further research, I found that corticosteroid shots seems to work for a lot of people but complications may develop. Moreover, corticosteroid shots are painful as I have heard from a lot of people and through talks on forums on the web. Now I am at a loss as to what I should do. Can anyone provide me with some advice? Your advice will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for plantar f. and anything that is prescribed just alleviates the pain or numbs it. What could help you is foor gels. Like Dr. Scholls.

  25. QUESTION:
    Can you use hard arch supports for Plantar Fasciitis?
    A friend of mine who has the same foot size I do has recently been suffering form heel pain. It seems like Plantar Fasciitis, it could be a heel spur she’s going to the doctor soon. I was wondering if the hard arch supports I got for repeated ankle sprains could help her in the meantime. The supports on heelspurs.com weren’t hard so I was concerned they might aggravate her heel.

    • ANSWER:
      Your friend might be interested in taking a look at http://www.bonespur.com/plantar-fasciitis.html

  26. QUESTION:
    Which inexpensive sandals would be good for Plantar fasciitis and heel spurs?
    I would like to know which sandals would be good for people with pf and heel spurs… Skechers shape up sandals, keen sandals, birenstock sandals, or some other names that I can’t remember. Would Doctor Scholls sandals be good or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Having experienced pf.I tried just about every shoe known to man.Finally had good luck with birkenstock sandals.Believe me you do not want a cheap shoe.I also have good luck with Merrell’s.

  27. QUESTION:
    Are there any inexpensive shoes for plantar fasciitis? Any advice on getting rid of it?
    I don’t have health insurance, and can’t afford a doctor. I’m 99% positive I’ve developed this. (It sounds crazy, but I think I’ve developed it from driving a lot. My clutch is far from the floor.)

    I’ve been going to the gym 4-5 times a week, have lost weight and want to continue, but fear not being able to go anymore until the pain goes away. I just want to walk again without pain!

    • ANSWER:
      possess as much information as you could maybe is one of the options,however it is quite time consuming,here http://www.HealthInsuranceIdeas.info/free-online-health-insurance.htm is the resource i have ever had good experience.

  28. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis and ibuprofen… pharmacist/doctor help please?
    I have plantar fasciitis. I’ll be on my feet tomorrow for about 5 hours. I’m only 5ft tall and 125lbs, if that matters. How much ibuprofen should I take and how often to make sure that my feet do not become a problem?

    Also… my boyfriend has back problems. He’s 5’10″ and about 165lbs… how often/how much should he take to avoid pain as well?

    • ANSWER:
      For any dosing call your local drug store and speak with the pharmacist – this is what they went to school for

  29. QUESTION:
    Is Plantar Fasciitis common for runners ? What may hv caused this injury & how do I resolve the problem?
    This past winter, I ran on a tread mill, because I don’t like running outdoors in the cold. When things warmed up, I started running outside again, but shortly after I started having foot problems. The pain is in the arch, and I think I have Plantar Fasciitis. It comes and goes, if it was constant I would have gone to a foot doctor already. The pain is noticeable after I start walking after being off my feet for a while. Then it seems to go away, shortly after being in a walking or running mode again.

    • ANSWER:
      This link will help you out:

      http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/fact/thr_report.cfm?Thread_ID=144&topcategory=Foot

  30. QUESTION:
    I suffer from Plantar fasciitis, workman’s comp denied me, I have no insurance and no cash. What can I do now?
    My injury manifested as a large swelling in the arch of my right foot. It’s more like a large circular, bruised knot that is raised about a1/2 inch from my foot. It will swell to about 1 inch to 1 1/2 inches from my foot. I was injured on the job in Ohio. I had 9 months or so of therapy and it did not make the knot go away. Workman’s comp was paying for everything until I was transfered to South Carolina. The doctors in SC did an MRI and diagnosed my condition. Once I had an official name for my injury, workman’s comp stopped paying and denied my claim. I have to have surgery. As of now I can only wear sandals because I have to keep my foot wrapped tight with an Ace Bandage and I can not fit my foot into a shoe. If I do not wrap my foot, the knot swells more and I can not walk. The pain is unbearable. I have had this condition for 4+ years now and have been eating pain pills like candy just to get through the day and I ice it down every night to get the swelling down. What do I do now?

    • ANSWER:
      Apparently your condition was not work related if it was get an attorney if you prevail attorney fees will be included. If in fact it is not work related:
      A drastic solution would be to move to another country (if you can) where the health care is free. Canada, England , France to name a few. That is if you cannot get care in the US for free or a reasonable price.

  31. QUESTION:
    ESWT: electro shockwave therapy for plantar fasciitis?
    I have bilateral plantar fasciitis. I’m seeing a doctor for ESWT because I’ve tried everything and it’s only that and surgery that I haven’t tried yet.

    Basically, all I need to know is does it work?
    What’s the success rate?
    how long does it take to fully heal?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there. I thought I would give you a little background on ESWT: there are different devices out there that purport to heal plantar fasciitis. You should know that the Ossatron is the only “high-energy” ESWT device to have been shown to have significant benefits (70% or greater positive outcomes) in all clinical trials. It is the only machine that has FDA approval for both heel and elbow tendonitis applications. Medicare has recently approved the use of “high-energy” devices only for use on plantar fasciitis in hospitals; many private insurors will still deny upon initial authorization request, claiming that the procedure is still considered investigational. You may have to appeal. However, keep in mind that this device is regularly used on professional athletes (Dwyane Wade, Alonzo Mourning, and Shawn Marion from the Miami Heat, just to name a few); additionally, the United States Air Force has incorporated the Ossatron into its treatment regimen as well. So the benefits are well-documented, it’s just that the major carriers continue to hold out awiating a clinical trial(s) that differentiates between the high-energy devices (effective) and the low-energy ones (ineffective).

      I hope that this helps. Feel free to email me anytime with questions.

      Cordially,

      Ed Hunt
      Shockwave Systems

  32. QUESTION:
    I’ve got plantar fasciitis, what specific things can I do to help speed recovery?
    Apart from going to the doctor, I’ve already done that.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment Options
      Treatment of plantar fasciitis begins with first-line strategies, which you can begin at home:

      Stretching exercises. Exercises that stretch out the calf muscles help ease pain and assist with recovery.
      Avoid going barefoot. When you walk without shoes, you put undue strain and stress on your plantar fascia.
      Ice. Putting an ice pack on your heel for 10 minutes several times a day helps reduce inflammation. Limit activities. Cut down on extended physical activities to give your heel a rest.
      Shoe modifications. Wearing supportive shoes that have good arch support and a slightly raised heel reduces stress on the plantar fascia. Your shoes should provide a comfortable environment for the foot.
      Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may help reduce pain and inflammation.
      Lose weight. Extra pounds put extra stress on your plantar fascia.
      If you still have pain after several weeks, see your foot and ankle surgeon, who may add one or more of these approaches:

      Padding and strapping. Placing pads in the shoe softens the impact of walking. Strapping helps support the foot and reduce strain on the fascia.
      Orthotic devices. Custom orthotic devices that fit into your shoe help correct the underlying structural abnormalities causing the plantar fasciitis.
      Injection therapy. In some cases, corticosteroid injections are used to help reduce the inflammation and relieve pain.
      Removable walking cast. A removable walking cast may be used to keep your foot immobile for a few weeks to allow it to rest and heal.
      Night splint. Wearing a night splint allows you to maintain an extended stretch of the plantar fascia while sleeping. This may help reduce the morning pain experienced by some patients.
      Physical therapy. Exercises and other physical therapy measures may be used to help provide relief.
      Although most patients with plantar fasciitis respond to non-surgical treatment, a small percentage of patients may require surgery. If, after several months of non-surgical treatment, you continue to have heel pain, surgery will be considered. Your foot and ankle surgeon will discuss the surgical options with you and determine which approach would be most beneficial for you.

      Long-Term Care

      No matter what kind of treatment you undergo for plantar fasciitis, the underlying causes that led to this condition may remain. Therefore, you will need to continue with preventive measures. If you are overweight, it is important to reach and maintain an ideal weight. For all patients, wearing supportive shoes and using custom orthotic devices are the mainstay of long-term treatment for plantar fasciitis.
      Self Care

      Rest the foot as much as possible, especially during the first week. Avoid jogging, running, and excess standing; instead, substitute exercises that do not put undue stress on the injured ligament, like bicycling or swimming.

      Apply ice to the tender area a few times daily to reduce inflammation. Try rolling the arch of the foot over an empty tennis ball can that has been filled with water and frozen; this both cools and stretches the affected area.

      Take over-the-counter pain relievers (ibuprofen, naproxen) to reduce pain and inflammation.

      Insert an over-the-counter arch support and heel support cushion into the shoe. Cut a hole in the pad to relieve pressure on the tender area if necessary. Try to avoid walking barefoot, since it may put added stress on the plantar ligament.

      Sit on a table with your knees bent. Loop a towel under the ball of the injured foot and pull, flexing the front of your foot upward. Keep your knee bent and try to press your foot against the towel.

      Sit on a chair and cross the ankle of the injured foot over the opposite knee. Slowly push the toes backward with your hand until you feel the stretch in the bottom of your foot.

      Stand facing a wall, about one foot away, with the injured foot about six inches farther back. Put your hands on the wall and gently lean forward, stretching the lower calf.

      Stand facing a wall, about two feet away, with the injured foot about six inches farther back. Keep both feet slightly turned outward. Put your hands on the wall and gently lean forward, bending the front knee and keeping the back heel on the floor.

      Contact a local foot and ankle surgeon.

  33. QUESTION:
    I have been told by my doctor i have plantar fasciitis, but over the weekend I wore some different shoes?
    and my ankle has really swollen up and turned a dark red colour and i have a red shin, also my calf and bottom leg and been feeling dead, are these all the same symptoms? Please someone help me i’m in agony!!

    • ANSWER:
      If it is getting worse, a return visit to the doctor is in order, and you should ask him for more effective pain medication. Meanwhile, JUST as a relief measure while you wait to see the doctor, keep your leg elevated to relieve the swelling and pressure, and wear soft slippers to minimize the pain.

  34. QUESTION:
    Doctor found that my right foot has Plantar fasciitis and gave me viantril-s as supplement. Is it OK?

    • ANSWER:
      Try to wear a little high heel shoes, may be a 1 1/2 – 2 inches ,
      it will reduce the pain. good luck.

  35. QUESTION:
    Will I ever completely recover from my Plantar Fasciitis?
    My doctor told me a bit about how to manage it, but he didn’t mention if a complete recovery was possible. It’s something I can live with, but it does get really irritating sometimes.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar fasciitis will come and go depending on your level of activity, i.e., if you are on your feet a lot (running, dancing, working as a cashier, etc), if you go barefoot a lot, or if you wear poorly fitting shoes.

      You could get some ongoing relief by raising the blankets off your feet at night. The pressure of bed covers on your feet while you’re sleeping can make plantar fasciitis worse, especially when you first wake up in the morning. You’d be surprised how much better your feet feel when they have room to move at night. Check out the website below for more information.

  36. QUESTION:
    Could this be part of my plantar fasciitis?
    I am 15 years old and I have been told i have plantar Fasciitis by my foot doctor about a year ago. Its fairly mild but it still hurts when i stand for a while and what not, But here is my question i was walking home to my apartment from the car and the top right of my ankle of my left foot kinda on the top of my foot started to painfully pop with each step so i been taking it a little easy and it not doing i anymore, But my whole ankle is a tiny bit numb what happend with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Don’t know what the problem is and you need to go to a doctor. This is NOT part of your plantar fascitis. The plantar area is a part of the bottom of your foot. The fascitis simply means inflamed. So inflamed plantar. But the feeling you are describing has nothing to do with the plantar of the foot. Get thee to a doctor!

  37. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis related to work?
    If you are working for a large company working in an intership as a custodian and almost 12 hours a day are spent on your feet and you developed pain in your feet, So you go to the company dictor and he dianosis you with plantar fasciitis, you wait 2 week following the doc’s orders and another doctor tell you its not plantar fasciitis and your options are to deal with it or leave the internship.

    Now here is the delema, you need the internship to be considered a full time student, if you leave you wont get the credit and in turn wont get money from the GI Bill and in turn will not be able to pay for and bills.

    what do you do?
    Can you sue said company for forcing you out if you get another opinion from you own doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      plantar fasciitis is easily treated, if that is indeed what you have. i may have some help for you regarding that issue. try going to myfootshop.com for some advice, the website has foot education and discussion forums with doc. use the source to give you a direct link and check it out, i don’t think you get plantar fasciitis from your work however it can add to the discomfort due to not being able to get the foot rest and time to heal. i work in a podiatry office and it is simple steps to treat plantar fasciitis. hang in there use the ideas in the articles and maybe you can work through the condition and keep your GI bill. i’m not sure on the suing issues. give the source a try and use the link to take you to site. good luck!

  38. QUESTION:
    Anyone else have Plantar Fasciitis?! HELP!? :)?
    Question says it all! :)

    Did/do you have it?? How did/do you get the pain away?! How long did you have it?! Any doctors who are answering this?

    What is Plantar Fasciitis? It is pain in the arch of your foot that occurs in the morning when you get up and if you sit or stand for long periods of time, it hurts… :P

    • ANSWER:
      Note the treatment below is for someone that has trigger point or flexibility issues in the calf musculature causing plantar fasciitis or its symptoms.

      1) Get a Strassburg sock. Wear every night. This alleviates the morning foot pain.
      2) Find the trigger point in the tibialis posterior muscle in your calf. (Trigger point workbook)
      3) Massage above the Achilles tendon.
      4) The arch plantar heel cup inserts at Wal-mart (Scholles?)
      5) Ankle stretches (pushing and leaning against a wall)

  39. QUESTION:
    Is it really plantar fasciitis? How do I get rid of this heel pain?
    I heard that plantar fasciitis pain is at it’s height early in the morning. My heel pain is the opposite. I am fine and sprightly in the morning, but as the day goes by I am limping from the pain. Sometimes, when I lie down to sleep, it hurts so much, it brings tears to my eyes.
    If it’s not plantar fasciitis, what the heck is it?

    I used to be very active, running 10ks, playing soccer, volleyball, dancing etc,.. but I had to stop almost completely because of this pain in the heel of my left foot. I was told by my doctor that it is plantar fasciitis and gave me a corticosteroid shot.
    It subsided for two months and then came back full force.
    I got another shot, and severely cut back to walking only a 15 minute mile 3 times a week. It worked for 3 months, but it still hurts! I went in for another shot of relief, and didn’t do any “unnecessary” activity.
    After a year of this pain, I have become 20 pounds heavier with unhealthy fat due to the side effects of the corticosteroid shots, and lack of exercise.
    I hate the unhealthy side effects, and would avoid getting another shot if there is a better alternative.

    The frustration is getting to me. I am losing hope, and getting heavier in an unhealthy way.
    Any help and advice is deeply appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Give your feet as much rest as possible for a week or so. Pain relievers can be used for comfort. Use that time to get proper-fitting shoes-that is, shoes with adequate arch supports and flexible soles. A one-quarter-inch (6mm) heel pad is a good idea. Some people need to wear only well padded shoes, such as running shoes. Lace the top two eyelets very firmly to take some tension off your ligaments. Try an orthotic device (obtained through a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon), especially if there is excessive pronation of the foot. Be very patient. This problem can take a year or more togo away. And good luck.

  40. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis- what to do next?
    i have had plantar fasciitis for over a year now and iv tried physical therapy ice heat and my doctors will not give me cortozon shots i wake up every morning cryiing and go to bed crying ehat should i do?

    • ANSWER:
      Buy shoes with a good orthotic insole, like a Nike walking shoe, or get something with a custom fitted orthotic. Do not wear other shoes, flats or heels. Buy some tingly foot cream, such as Burt’s Bees with Peppermint, and have your significant other give you a foot massage, or you can do it for yourself. Soak your feet in a basin of warm water with Epsom salts added, and dry them off carefully afterwards, especially between the toes (the drying is not specific to plantar fasciitis, it is just good practice generally). Keep your feel elevated when you sit, and do not stand for a long time on a hard, unyeilding surface.

      Sign up for a deep water Aquatics exercise program at your local YMCA or any other good facility. This will help you stretch out your leg and foot muscles without pounding your feet on the floor. When you are able, walk barefoot around your house.

      Every day, practice slowly and carefully stretching the sole of your foot like this: lift your toes upwards towards your knee and flex your foot carefully from the ankle upwards. Repeat.

      Your feet will recover in time, but you must be careful not to re-injure them. This does not mean that you should become sedentary and immobile, however. It can take a long time for plantar fasciitis to resolve completely, so be patient and do not get frustrated. I agree with your doctor not to give you cortizone shots. If you need to take something for the pain, take an aspirin or another anti-inflammatory such as Ibuprofen. I prefer aspirin.

  41. QUESTION:
    I have pretty bad plantar fasciitis. Should i still play football?
    It hurts pretty bad. And one day after the doctor told me i had it,i practiced and it got much worse. Should i play?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are hurting too much you should not play. However, there are things you can do to relieve this pain.

      First, Plantar Fascitis is caused by a stretching of the plantar fascia and the supporting muscles. In lay-mans terms, your arch is dropping.

      1) Get yourself a good orthotic that will give you good arch support. This will help maintain the arch and remove some of the pressure on the plantar fascia.

      2) Stretch your hamstrings – If you can get the hamstrings stretched out, it will relieve pressure on the calves and thus relieve pressure on the foot.

      3) DON’T Stretch out the foot. Many Physical therapists(and coaches) will tell you straighten out your leg and stretch your foot up. While this may relieve the pain in the short run, it is actually making the condition worse. Stretch the Hamstrings instead.

      4) See a chiropractor that will adjust your feet. If your feet are out of alignment, It can really put a lot of pressure on the Plantar fascia. Remember, it is the bones that support your arch. A foot adjustment will not only feel good, but also keep your feet working properly.

      Good luck with this.

  42. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis from work what is this case worth?
    i began working on this job as a temp emp.. when i got there i notice how easy it was to move up in this business and how equal oppt. plays a roll in the company. I was told with a lil hard work i could easily get hired on permentally and move up in the company but there was some there that has been there on temp for 2 or 3 years. they put me in one of the worse position in the building,it was too building hugh boxes. It was a requirement to get 4 boxes in a 10 hr period. after i learned the job i showed them a strategy on how to get more boxes done. it worked but it was hard work. so they hired me on permentaly with in 7 mo. they move me to night shift to get the same thing done with the night shift crew and it was successful also. with both shift doing 7 to 8 boxes thats 15 to 16 boxes a day we ran out of work to the point to where we only needed 1 shift. my seniority wasnt there so they moved me to another department the other one that no one wanted to do. installing radiators. there THEY were only doing 2 or 2.5 units a day. to make along story short when i got thru with my strategy i was doing 5 a day by myself and 7 with two other helpers. this cause me to have to do a lot of climbing and forceful walking. my heels started hurting real bad when i would go on break and especially when i wake up in the mornings. I told my team leader and he said that auggh its just a heel spur. but he didnt report it. so i told him that i was going to the doctor and he said to let him no what the doctor say. i was diagnosis with bi-lateral plantar fasciitis with severe lower extremeties. i have seen a total of 5 doctors that stated and charted that it was job related. so my employer sent me to have ime. the company doctor stated that i do have the injury but it didnt come from the job. but he stated in his notes that he didnt think that i could work on hard surfaces for a prolonged perion of time. so my atty ask if he think that the surface at my job aggravated my condition. the company doctor answered and said that walking is a part of life. and that it didnt come from the job. 5 doctors said yes it did and 1 the company doc said it didnt. what would you do in this situation?

    • ANSWER:

  43. QUESTION:
    Anyone have Plantar Fasciitis?
    I’m 18 years old and I’ve had plantar fasciitis for three years. I’ve seen two different doctors and have done pretty much every treatment option available which ranges from physical therapy, cortisone injections, pills, and much more. Only treatment I haven’t tried is ESWT and surgery.

    I’ve had it for a very long time now and I’ve posted questions asking about plantar fasciitis several times before. I figured it wouldn’t hurt to try asking again.

    If you’ve ever had plantar fasciitis before, how did you cure it?

    I’m posting this in the Running section because this was an injury that I got three years ago (from running) and I’m hoping runners can answer this question better than the injury section. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar Fasciitis is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some people, heel spurs. It can also result in arch pain. Plantar Fasciitis is often caused by abnormal pronation of the foot and improper arch support. Contributing factors are weight gain, intense physical activity, jobs that require a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces, or shoes with poor arch support.

      Research has found that a combination of proper exercises and arch support by wearing orthotic insoles can provide effective relief for plantar fasciitis.

      An explanation of the importance that proper arch support plays in controlling over-pronation, and some stretching exercises for relief are provided in the links below:

  44. QUESTION:
    How do I get Disability? I have Fibromyalgia, Plantar Fasciitis and Tarsel Tunnel…?
    Is anyone on disability due to Fibromyalgia or Plantar Fasciits? I have Fibromyalgia, Plantar Fasciitis, Tarsel Tunnel and I’m severely flat-footed.
    I have had to quit my job due to the pain and flat out inability to walk or work. Doctors want to due surgeries on both feet for the Plantar Fasciitis and Tarsel Tunnel but I can’t afford it. I’m in extreme pain everyday from the feet/ankle pain, I have all over pain everyday, and misc. other health problems.
    Do I qaulify for Disability? I’m worried because it is extremely hard right now to keep my bills paid and finding a job is even harder. I don’t have a lot of training or experience either.
    Please let me know if anyone has gotten on disability for any of this…

    • ANSWER:
      You need to start the application process. No one here can know for sure Before you apply talk to your doctors and make sure you read all the information about the process very carefully. It can be difficult to be approved for disability, especially if there is the possibility that you could work at a different kind of job.

      For the plantar fasciitis:

      Rest until it is not painful. It can be very difficult to rest the foot as most people will be on their feet during the day for work. By walking on the painful foot you are continually aggravating the injury and increasing inflammation. Rest as much as possible and stop any unnecessary activities which place additional stress on the fascia.
      A good plantar fasciitis taping technique can help the foot get the rest it needs by supporting the plantar fascia. Tape is applied in strips across the plantar fascia taking the stress off the foot which healing to take place.
      Apply ice or cold therapy to help reduce pain and inflammation. Cold therapy can be applied regularly until symptoms have resolved.
      Stretching the plantar fascia is an important part of treatment and prevention. Simply reducing pain and inflammation alone is unlikely to result in long term recovery. The plantar fascia tightens up making the origin at the heel more susceptible to stress.
      A plantar fasciitis night splint is an excellent product which is worn overnight and gently stretches the calf muscles and plantar fascia preventing it from tightening up overnight.

      This site explains more about these suggestions and has more help.

      http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/cybertherapist/front/foot/plantarfaciitis.htm

      Some of the treatments for tarsal tunnel are much the same as for plantar fasciitis. A variety of treatment options, often used in combination, are available to treat tarsal tunnel syndrome. These include:

      Rest. Staying off the foot prevents further injury and encourages healing.
      Ice. Apply an ice pack to the affected area, placing a thin towel between the ice and the skin. Use ice for 20 minutes and then wait at least 40 minutes before icing again.
      Oral medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, help reduce the pain and inflammation.
      Immobilization. Restricting movement of the foot by wearing a cast is sometimes necessary to enable the nerve and surrounding tissue to heal.
      Physical therapy. Ultrasound therapy, exercises, and other physical therapy modalities may be prescribed to reduce symptoms.
      Injection therapy. Injections of a local anesthetic provide pain relief, and an injected corticosteroid may be useful in treating the inflammation.
      Orthotic devices. Custom shoe inserts may be prescribed to help maintain the arch and limit excessive motion that can cause compression of the nerve.
      Shoes. Supportive shoes may be recommended.
      Bracing. Patients with flatfoot or those with severe symptoms and nerve damage may be fitted with a brace to reduce the amount of pressure on the foot.

      http://www.footphysicians.com/footankleinfo/tarsal-tunnel-syndrome.htm

      Flat feet are a little more difficult to address. Many doctors recommend therapy to strengthen the damaged ligaments or tendons that may have caused the condition. Therapy treatments can include prolotherapy, which is designed to naturally strengthen the damaged tendons over a period of time. The use of inflammatory healing stimulates the body into repairing itself. This type of therapy is thought to be a permanent solution to flat feet.

      http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-treatments-for-flat-feet.htm

      http://www.buzzle.com/articles/flat-feet-treatment.html

      Try using the gel filled orthotics you can buy at the drug store. I watched a documentary about custom made orthhotics and the documentary said that they are the same as the ones you buy over the counter, except that they cost hundreds of dollars. So don’t waste money on the custom ones. I hope some of this is of some help.

  45. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis how… long?!?
    Ok I was recently diagnosed with plantar fasciitis, tuesday to be exact. The doctor said it was very hard to cure. I had already thought I had it so I look up stretches and started doing those, and I’m rolling a frozen can under my feet at night, and soaking it in hot water in the morning just like he told me to. He said it should heal up in about a week, atleast that’s how long my excusal note from gym said. I’m in 9th grade, and I play on a soccer team. I want to get back to the field as soon as possible. Does anyone know how long it will take to go away? It’s EXTREMELY painful, and I want it gone! OH and I had the pain for about a week before I finally went to the doctor…I heard the sooner you start treating it the sooner it heals. So how long will it take to go away and does anyone know any other tips for the pain and faster healing?
    The reason I’m doubting the doc on it healing in a week is because it’s been four days and it still KILLS.

    • ANSWER:
      One source I found in a web search said with the usual treatments most patients find relief within 3 months and 90% within a year.

      It did mention cortisone shots, but said that 2 potentially bad effects could be fat pad atrophy and plantar fascial rupture.

      It also mentioned Extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a new treatment http://orthopedics.about.com/od/footankle/i/shockwave.htm

      But it would be best to correct the problem, instead just treating the pain, by getting shoes that fit properly with proper arch support. I developed something that felt like heel spurs from cheap Walmart shoes. I finally got better quality shoes and the heel pain totally disappeared (years ago, never to return).

  46. QUESTION:
    Can I go to general doctors for a foot problem?
    I may have plantar fasciitis or something similar but I don’t have any foot doctors close by so I’m wondering if I could just go to my normal doctors and they can x-ray and stuff and see what’s wrong with my foot, can I do that?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. If you need more help than they can give, they can refer you to a podiatrist.

  47. QUESTION:
    is a walking boot a good choice for plantar fasciitis?
    two years ago my doctor told me i have plantar fasciitis, and it doesn’t really bother me, just occasionally. i don’t have the splitting pain in the morning, just really tired ((not necessarily painful)) feet after walking for a while. sometimes in softball it hurts. i’m only 13 and i want to know if i should get a walking cast ((i heard they cause pelvic tilts and they are expensive!)) or a night cast to help. they’re expensive though and i’m trying for one for christmas. please helppp!!!
    i’m just trying to relieve my tired feet ((they’re really tired in the mornings)) and avoid problems && pain.
    i have tired ankles too :) haha
    i don’t know how much i’ll use a boot though. after practice probably, and after walking alot.

    • ANSWER:
      You should try specific Plantar Fasciitis exercises and good fitting shoes made for people with feet problems. Make sure to stretch your calf muscle daily. Some good shoes to look into are Kuru Footwear and New Balance sneakers. You will be surprised at the difference supportive shoes make. Good luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    Heel Pain & Plantar fasciitis?
    About 3 years ago, I took a plane ride and was jammed in a small seat with my heels pressed hard against the floor for an extended period of time. I got a small amount of pain in each heel. I then went to the gym and ran on a treadmill and the pain suddenly became really sharp and bad, I had to stop running immediately and had to limp home.

    After several weeks of not being able to walk when I first woke up, I started doing research and discovered I had plantar fasciitis. I went to a foot doctor, who gave me some stretching exercise, and told me to buy arch supports for my shoes which I wear all the time. He also gave me a boot to wear in my sleep, but I cannot sleep with this so I have never won it. I stretch pretty frequently, and exercise now on an elliptical instead of running on the treadmill. My foot pain is almost all gone, but is still there. Its manageable, but I would like to eliminate it completely.

    Is this something that typically stays forever, or should it go away eventually? Can anyone think of anything more I can do to help the process?

    • ANSWER:
      Perceptive’s answer is good, but not good enough because it doesn’t address your plantar fasciiitis (PF). PF is a specific problem, and as long as you don’t keep gently stretching your fascia at night, you’re just delaying your recovery, because you’re regressing each night, even as you may do the exercises by day. Why are you not wearing your PF splint at night? I know it’s a hassle, but it’s worth it, and it’s my guess that it’s going to be the factor in getting you finally over your PF.

      Have you spoken to your doctor who prescribed your PF splint? There are different types of splints..maybe if the one your doc prescribed for you isn’t workable, s/he might be able to prescribe another type.

      It sounds like you are probably flat footed (?) since PF usually strikes those with one extreme or the other, flat feet or high arches. As long as you continue to put the incorrect stress on your fascia, because it reduces the pounding effect of running, but it sounds like it’s not enough for you to heal completely. Doing an elliptical was a great idea, but apparently for your own situation just not enough of a change. How about finding a different form of exercise, like swimming, which you can focus on for awhile, while your PF heals? Swimming is great aerobic exercise. Although swimming doesn’t provide you with the bone-building impact you get with running, it is a good alternative in the meantime, I think. You won’t be able to get over your PF problems until you give your fascia a suitable and long enough rest, combined with gentle stretching–otherwise, in effect, you will just keep reinjuring your old injury every day as you keep on with your old behavior.

      Do yourself a favor, go back to your doc and tell him/her that you just haven’t healed, and ask him/her what you need to do to get OVER this. IF your pf night splint isn’t working, ask for another one.

      Good luck!

  49. QUESTION:
    PLANTAR FASCIITIS, I know i have PF I have had it for a least a year. I have not gone to the doctor yet.?
    I want to buy night splints off the net, so I wanted to know if you have had PF and tried night splints and if so which ones would you suggest I buy.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi I don’t have any personal use of night splints but I found a great article on the Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis and it recommends night splints as well a heating pad.

      It has some great info so I have given you the link below:

      http://www.thestretchinghandbook.com/archives/plantar-fasciitis.php

      Good Luck and I hope you can get to a Dr soon to diagnose your condition!

  50. QUESTION:
    Plantar Fasciitis – Is there a link to diabetes?
    Someone I know has got the heel problem Plantar Fasciitis and I think he should get checked out for diabetes as I have heard there is a link. He has also got a fungal infection in his toenails though he puts this down to ingrowing toenails the nails on his big toes have died and fallen off- I have also heard this is linked to diabetes – I wondered why his doctor did not test him for this as he is also slightly over weight and 48 years old

    • ANSWER:
      Diabetes can, in fact, be a link to Plantar Fasciitis, though doctors are not too sure on why that may be. (See the link below.) Having said that, however, because your friend has Plantar Fasciitis doesn’t necessarily mean that he is diabetic. There are other causes.

      If your friend has worries that he may be diabetic, he could always ask his doctor to test him for it. Of course, the doctor would want other symptoms to be present also. i.e., excessive thirst, excessive urination, excessive hunger, etc.

      If you know anyone that is diabetic, you could always ask them if they’d be willing to give your friend a blood test. This could give some indication of whether or not he has raised blood sugars, but don’t make the mistake of jumping to the conclusion that he is diabetic. It always pays to get it tested properly. A doctor would most likely do a fasting blood glucose test initially. (That’s testing after the patient hasn’t eaten since the previous night.) If this gives a result higher than normal, the doctor may then go on to do a Glucose Tolerance Test, where the patient is given a highly sweet drink, and his/her blood sugar is tested several in later hours to see how well his/her system is dealing with this sudden influx of sugar.

      I’m presuming that you’re living in the UK or Ireland, seeing as this question was asked on Yahoo! Answers UK & Ireland. If this is the case, you’ll find that several large chemists now offer an initial blood test, that’s free of charge.

      You may, of course, be correct in your suspicions that your friend has diabetes. Certainly, fungal nail infections are relatively more common on diabetic patients than other folk.

      Toe nails, by the way, do NOT develop fungal infections due to being ingrown. Treatment for fungal nail infection is a long arduous process, sometimes taking in excess of a year to treat. This is something else your friend needs to see his doctor for.


Plantar Fasciitis Doctor See

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Have had no luck with Podiatrist for plantar fasciitis. What other kind of doctor should I see?

    • ANSWER:
      You may need to try another podiatrist for another opinion (depending on what happens with the other specialists I’m going to recommend), but another specialty you can try besides podiatry is that of an orthopedic surgeon or even a chiropractor to see what they might be able to do to help your plantar fasciitis.

  2. QUESTION:
    Whats a great way to cure/help Plantar Fasciitis?
    I have read everything I could and came to what I beleieve I have is Plantar Fasciitis. I have not seen a doctor because I have read a lot of little things to help out with it such as stretching, night splints ect. But I was just wondering if anyone else has this or know of anything that works great to get you going besides the stretching? I work at a sit in job all day so when I get up and go at work it hurt so bad I can’t stand the thought of getting up again the rest of the day. I just need some advice. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Sadly, no.

      The stretches and “whatnot” are by far and away the most effective “non-DR” way to effectively cure/manage palantar fasciitis. Quite a sad realisation at that, considering most patients never get over the initial pain the stretching causes and thereby, cease to stretch, just making their problem worse.

      Your job isnt going to help you at all, and in all likely hood, you will need to see your Dr. if the pain contiues. In your question, you dont mention chronicity so i cant advise you on that. But, if its getting worse instead of better, stop being stubborn and go see a doctor. This is one of those “compounding worseness” type problems, as in, the worse you let it get, the worse it will continue to get.

      And yes, i did just make that term up, but it should describe the situation adequately.

      For non dr methods… a simple change to the proper footwear could be the most effective(stay away from heels!) and medicinally, over the counter “Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs” (NSAIDS) are your best bet. This is assuming you dont have erosive essophagitis, peptic ulcers, gastric bypass, or an allergy to them, or anything that falls within that general realm and applies to you. Note to self: Reading the back of the box helps lol. Motrin/ibuprofin(same thing) are the most common. I would reccomend taking 1000mg tylenol every 4hrs/16hrs(4x’s) with 800mg motrin every 6hrs/18hrs(3x’s daily.) Im not a doctor so dont quote me on those, but in my experience in the hosptial, thats the general rule of thumb and is QUITE effective at meteing out a medicinal can of whoop-ass to a plethora of general aches and pains as well. And yes, you can take both together without turning your liver and kidneys into prunes.

      Note however if you do use this method… you MUST STILL DO THE STRETCHES IF IT MANAGES THE PAIN!!!! Pain management is to FACILITATE the streching, and allow the eventual discontinuance of the medication. In my opinon, this would be the best way to go about it if you have “white coat syndrome” or the “i dont need no freakin whack quack dr” mentality.

      If this has been going on for awhile though, i would recommend seing a dr. He/she/it WILL recommend the streches, possibly get you referral to see a physical therapist, MAYBE the odd podiatrist depending on how jacked up your feet are, for specialized fit and footwear. Additionally, naprosyn(and all its variants) will generally be perscribed at this point as well. It falls into the same NSAID family as motrin but is much more potent. Just remember, with all NSAIDs, accumilation in the system is required for theraputic effect… ie you wont notice pain relief form an NSAID until the 3rd-4th dose generally.

      Quite common to hear people complain about how NSAIDS dont work when they only poped the first dose… now you know why.

      If the oral NSAIDs are ineffective… then you will probably get an injection of Kenalog(an actual steroid, glucocorticoid if you want to be specific) in the realm of about 40mg’s. This is VERY effective in the management of this type of pain and lasts for as many days as milligrams, tending to make it the prefered choice among chronic sufferers of this condition. Works wonders on eczema too. This medication does have a myriad of side effects to potentially be aware of, but your dr can go over those with you. The most notable are generally strange dreams, nightmares, restless sleep, head ache, sterile abcess at the point of injection, and blanching(whtening) of the skin. Occasional mood swings as well. Most of these can be managed by simply being ALERT and “slowing your roll” if necessary lol.

      The more concerning side effects tend to come with long term use of the roid, and so i will not go over them here.

      As for what happens after this step, i couldnt tell you, as this is the furthest i have gone in managing/assisting in managing with my patients and RARELY have seen a repeat customer with agressive use of phys therapy and the injection should it be required. In fact, ive only had to give the injection 3 times because, as initially stated, the streches are the most effective method and once physical therapy gets ahold of my patients… I generally dont see them again till they get something else!

      Hope that helps.

  3. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis???
    Does anyone know anything about the treatment of plantar fasciits? Based on research that I have done the signs and symtoms I have I have determined that is have plantar fasciitis. (severe pain mainly just upon riseing in the morning or after rest in the arch just before the heel, it is only in my left foot. but now its getting so bad the pain is not relieved with rest) Has anyone ever had it? Does anyone know how I can releive my pain without seeing a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Not only am I familiar with common at-home remedies, but I am a sufferer myself. I know your pain, so to speak…not fun.
      First of all, be sure to stretch your feet out before getting out of bed in the morning. Hold your heel with one hand and stretch your toes *back* using the other hand as a lever. Do this for at least 30 seconds on each foot, twice. Sometimes negative pressure helps, too. If you have a golf ball, or even a tennis ball, try rolling it around on the ground with your heel, applying pressure as you are comfortable.
      Ice helps more than heat, too, so at the end of the day try elevating your feet and putting ice on your arches/heels. Elevation helps a lot, as well as *flexing* those feet. When you rest, your tendon shortens and then is shocked and aggrivated when you hop out of bed in the morning. Warming it up with stretching should help.
      Good shoes will also make a great difference–those with good padding and arch support. The New Balance shoe is good; I’ve had success with them. Also might try OTC inserts (before going to expensive orthotics), like Pinnacle makes. They have some made specifically for this type of problem.
      Rest and stretching and elevation, and good shoes! :) Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Plantar Fasciitis?
    My heels get really sore for what seems no reason and I’ve looked up some possible diagnosis’ and it seems the most plausible one is for Plantar Fasciitis. How can I know for sure without spending 2 hours waiting to see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Well unfortunately you’ll probably want to go to a podiatrist anyway. Even if you can decide for yourself that you have Plantar Faciitis you will want something to help take the pain away and that usually means orthotics.

      Does the pain also happen in the arch of your foot? If it is Plantar Faciitis it will most likely hurt there too.

      It’s a very simple diagnosis and you would save yourself a lot of trouble by just going to a doctor.

  5. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis?
    So I was told about a two or three years ago that I have plantar fasciitis… I never really did much about it .. Imean I iced it when it hurt or rolled a ball under my foot. Just recently I got a little brace thing that does help it..somewhat…
    But I am keep being told by my physical therapist (who i do not see for my foot) that I should go to the doctor for it (I haven’t been there for over a year) and she thinks that I should have something done to take care of it.
    Have any of you done that? Or do you just do things at home?

    • ANSWER:
      The people that I know who have had surgery for this, didn’t do so well. I have it too. My feet hurt a lot, especially if I am standing or walking for long periods. I went to a podiatrist and he gave me insets for my shoes which does help. Also, gentle stretching of the ligaments helps. When I use the treadmill, I have found that I can only walk when on an incline(hill), because that stretches the bottom of my feet while I am walking.

      I would see doctor just to make sure nothing else is going on. I have inflammatory arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease that affects the joints. Since you are having physical therapy somewhere else I wondered if you have been checked for an inflammatory condition that can be causing your problem. Otherwise, a podiatrist(foot doctor), or chiropractor can offer you tips on natural care. Lindsay’s Mom

  6. QUESTION:
    ESWT: electro shockwave therapy for plantar fasciitis?
    I have bilateral plantar fasciitis. I’m seeing a doctor for ESWT because I’ve tried everything and it’s only that and surgery that I haven’t tried yet.

    Basically, all I need to know is does it work?
    What’s the success rate?
    how long does it take to fully heal?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there. I thought I would give you a little background on ESWT: there are different devices out there that purport to heal plantar fasciitis. You should know that the Ossatron is the only “high-energy” ESWT device to have been shown to have significant benefits (70% or greater positive outcomes) in all clinical trials. It is the only machine that has FDA approval for both heel and elbow tendonitis applications. Medicare has recently approved the use of “high-energy” devices only for use on plantar fasciitis in hospitals; many private insurors will still deny upon initial authorization request, claiming that the procedure is still considered investigational. You may have to appeal. However, keep in mind that this device is regularly used on professional athletes (Dwyane Wade, Alonzo Mourning, and Shawn Marion from the Miami Heat, just to name a few); additionally, the United States Air Force has incorporated the Ossatron into its treatment regimen as well. So the benefits are well-documented, it’s just that the major carriers continue to hold out awiating a clinical trial(s) that differentiates between the high-energy devices (effective) and the low-energy ones (ineffective).

      I hope that this helps. Feel free to email me anytime with questions.

      Cordially,

      Ed Hunt
      Shockwave Systems

  7. QUESTION:
    Persistant Plantar Fasciitis?
    Back in April, I was involved in an auto accident. Ever since then, I have had pain in my foot/heel that was diagnosed as Plantar Fasciitis. I have seen a Podiatrist who has given me three (3) Cortisone shots as also prescribed anti-inflammatory medicine for me to take for this.

    But the pain is still there. I am actually off work right now because of a Rotator Cuff injury that I got from the same accident. The doctor said that being off of my feet would help, but it almost seems that it’s making it worse. The pain is not there 100% of the time, of course it happens when I get up from sitting or laying down, but it also hurts when I lay down at night or even just sitting on the couch.

    Should I see another doctor? Or just play the waiting game for now???

    • ANSWER:
      PF can be chronic. Because of the nature of the tissue that is inflamed, and the fact that we use our feet often – it’s hard to “walk off”.
      The reason staying off your feet hurts more is because when you lie down, you point your toes, which allows the fascia to “shrink” – then when you get up you have to stretch it out all over again!
      A few “home” remedies you can try are to always wear socks or slippers on hard floors, use frozen juice cans to massage the fascia (ice and massage!) by rolling your feet along the cans, and stretching your calves gently, which often helps PF if the calves are too tight and are pulling “up” on the fascia. You could also talk to a sports therapist about learning to tape the fascia while you are healing.
      There is also something called the “Strassburg Sock” which is worn during rest – it keeps the foot in a flexed position overnight so that shortenting doesn’t happen overnight. This gives the fascia time to heal without being constantly streched and pulled.
      A proper running shoe that can control any biomechanical problems you’re having may also be helpful.
      At the end of the day, PF is one of those really annoying things that just takes time and patience to heal.
      Best of luck!!

  8. QUESTION:
    Please help!!! Intense Plantar Fasciitis foot pain! Any suggestions?
    I really need some relief. I can barely walk anymore! I went to go see a foot doctor and he told me I have Plantar Fasciitis. What is that and how did I get it? He gave me some orthotics but they don’t help at all! I don’t know what else to do. I work as a waitress so I’m on my feet all day. If I don’t get some help I’m afraid I might have to quit my job. Anybody know of anything that can help me live a normal life again? Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar Fasciitis is caused by excessive stretching of the fibrous tissue that is present at the bottom of the foot. This excessive stretching can lead to heel and arch pain. Plantar Fasciitis can be aggravated or caused by an unusually high arch, sudden changes in physical activity, improper footwear, obesity, and the weight gain associated with pregnancy.

      Care measures include applying ice, stretching, anti-inflammatory medications, and gentle massage.

  9. QUESTION:
    Heel pain/plantar fasciitis/collapsed arch?
    On Nov 30/Dec 1, I started having pain in a spot on the inside of my right foot just behind the arch. It has been bothering me on and off for the last 8 months (prolonged walking seemed to aggravate it). If it was bugging me and I’d rest, it would usually bug me pretty bad when I first got back on my feet and then subside some (although I don’t recall it bothering 1st thing in the morning, except MAYBE Dec. 1). Sometimes if I’m standing and my foot is bothering me, I’ll lift my foot up (bend my knee) to give it a break, but I have a throbbing pain where the spot is that bothers me. I finally went to see my doctor on June 24; she said it might be an inflamed sac, tendinitis, or a bone spur so she sent me in for an x-ray but nothing showed up, so she sent me to an orthopedic (appointment was on July 28). The orthopedic (after looking at different x-rays taken that day, and looking at and feeling my foot [he pushed down on the spot that was the center of the pain, which hurt pretty bad even though it hadn't been bothering me at all that day by that point]) said I had plantar fasciitis. He gave me a handout with a brief overview of plantar fasciitis and some stretches I could do to help my foot. He also sent me to have custom orthotics made (appointment for the evaluation/molding for the orthotics was 2 days ago (Aug 3), and the guy said my right arch was collapsed. I have been keeping up with my stretching (4-5 times a day like the orthopedic said), but I’ve been having heel pain almost every day since I had my appointment with the orthopedic (unusual, considering it usually would only bother me for a couple days in a row and then fade away for at least a few days). (Btw, I found out from the handout the orthopedic gave me that I was at risk for getting plantar fasciitis, even though I’m 19 and it usually hits middle-aged people. I have flat feet, I guess I have fairly inflexible calf muscles, I’m overweight (working to fix that), and I would stop suddenly sometimes when I fenced.)
    My questions (sorry for the long intro, but I wanted to make sure you all had any possibly relevant info to help) are:
    -Will the delay in getting the diagnosis and starting recovery make recovery longer? (In other words, I know it may take at least 6 months to really start feeling better, but is that reasonable in how long I waited?)
    -From what I’ve read, my case doesn’t seem to be too normal, so is it possible that I have something else (bone spurs and stress fractures have been eliminated through x-rays)?
    -Is it normal for pain to get worse before it gets better?
    -Do you think it’s likely that I can ween myself down to stretching once or twice a day after my foot starts getting better, and if so, any ideas on how long that might take?
    -What can I do (if anything) to help my right collapsed arch return to normal? (Collapsed arch and fallen arch mean the same thing, right?)
    -Is plantar fasciitis genetic (or at least one of those things that makes any children more susceptible to acquiring it)?

    • ANSWER:
      Alright, your statement was so long but beneficial though. I’m a physiotherapist. I’ll try to help you solve those inquiry and worries of yours. Its nice that you tried to mention all the things needed to verify your condition. Stress fracture is a small crack that happens into a bone. And sometimes X-ray is unable to detect small cracks. Bone mineral density scan will help you there are hairline fracture. However, lets eliminate the fracture idea because it was sufficient enough that your condition is a musculoskeletal thing. Since you have mentioned that you have a flatfoot, this is the main reason why other complications comes in. Your line of gravity is diverted to another area instead in between the arch of your foot therefore your foot muscles will be stressed out to correct the problem. This is not correctable condition but manageable. You must have a good shoe cushioning to manage your flat foot. Overweight? seriously you have to help your self to deal with that. the prognosis it may take longer if will not manage your self. Avoid strenuous activities and frequent rest period is required. Foot muscle strengthening will be able to help you too for additional support of your foot (search the internet for exercises). Try to put ice for 10-15 minutes to manage the pain. plantar fascitis? I don’t think it was a genetic, I’ve never encountered from my med books.
      Collapsed or fallen arch? yes, absolutely they are similar. Hope I helped you with my ideas.

  10. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis and surgery … please give me some answer !!!!!?
    I’ve had plantar Fasciitis since feb of 09′ and ive done everything to fix it !!! my only other option is to get surgery. My surgery is june 4th but im going nuts because im not sure whats going to be the “after effects” because me and my doctor havent really talked more about it ! i will be going to see my doctor the 17th to talk more about it, sign the papers ect but until then im going nuts !!!! but was wondering -

    - the recovery time ?
    - am i going to be using crutches after or have anything placed on my foot, stiches ?
    - hows the pain ?

    and whatever else you can tell me about it.
    Thanks in advance !!!!
    its for plantar fasciitius, they are going to be cutting the ligament (sp) to release some of the strain on my feet, having 1 done now and the other when this one heals

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    Foot Pain?? I think it might be Plantar Fasciitis. Has anyone had this or have an idea why my foot hurts?
    Yesterday I was shopping when I got a sharp pain in the side of my foot. I didnt twist it or anything I was simply walking. It hurts now when I walk especially outside on uneven ground. Standing and cooking and doing the dishes about killed me it was really hurting after that so I sat down to relax and a friend pointed out the bump on the inside of my foot about the size of a quarter it isnt discolored or anything but it is right at the back of the arch at the front of the heel. It really hurts to put pressure on that area. I think it is the Plantar fasciliitis anyone ever have this and should I see a doctor. Anyone know of the best way to handle this type of thing. I have 3 kids and my husband is currently walking around on a cane due to a work injury so I pretty much do everything I really need the advice on how to cope with this. I have also been walking more and bike riding. Thanks for any and all answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Jewels
      HI! I feel your pain. I have had Plantarfacitius for about 10 years, I recently got an early retirement thru…finally, as I cannot work at my job as a hairdresser, anymore.
      I have tried orthapedic shoes, with special insoles from the foot dr. specialist,,,,, I’ve tried all sorts of insoles…. and let me tell ya, I have not found any relief. There is a hospital in Tri-Cities Wa. where they do surgery for this, but I don’t have any medical insurance AT ALL, and now that I’m retired, I cannot afford the high preminum’s ,,,, for medical insurance,. so I’m pretty much SC R — – ED…..
      I don’t have much good news for ya….. and now I also have arthritis in my right hip too!!!!
      Plantarfacitius is very very painful. It’s all I can do to get my dishes done, or mop my kitchen floor, or simple tasks like take the trash out to the curb for pick-up….. without tears, and having to sit down……. I wish you well, but I’m afraid I haven’t helped you much. The best way to handle it, is to try and find a good “Arch Support” Shoe, with insole…. and stay off your feet as much as you can. Try this excerise:
      Sitting in a straight back chair, put your heels on the floor ,, toes up in the air,,,, then switch ,,, point toes down, with heels up off the floor….. that really helps to stretch those top of the foot muscles, as well as that arch…
      AND GOOD LUCK TO YOU……

  12. QUESTION:
    How long to heal a Plantar Fasciitis?
    I’m so fed up with this! First I broke a foot and was in a cast till end of October, once the cast was off I had to wear a spleen till January. Now that I threw this thing away I’ve been diagnosed with a plantar fasciitis!!!

    How long does it usually take for a plantar fasciitis to go away?

    I haven’t seen my family doctor yet. I went to the foot doctor to do a follow up on my broken foot and he said: oh oh! (sigh)
    I read on the Internet that often it’s the heel that hurts, in my case it’s the foot arch.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar fasciitis can take a long time to heal if not treated properly, so please follow your physician’s recommendations and the suggestion provided here.

      Plantar Fasciitis is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some people, heel spurs. It can also result in arch pain. Plantar Fasciitis is often caused by abnormal pronation of the foot and improper arch support. Contributing factors are weight gain, intense physical activity, jobs that require a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces, or shoes with poor arch support.

      Research has found that a combination of proper exercises and arch support by wearing orthotic insoles can provide effective relief for plantar fasciitis.

      An explanation of the importance that proper arch support plays in controlling over-pronation, and some stretching exercises for relief are provided in the links below

  13. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis from work what is this case worth?
    i began working on this job as a temp emp.. when i got there i notice how easy it was to move up in this business and how equal oppt. plays a roll in the company. I was told with a lil hard work i could easily get hired on permentally and move up in the company but there was some there that has been there on temp for 2 or 3 years. they put me in one of the worse position in the building,it was too building hugh boxes. It was a requirement to get 4 boxes in a 10 hr period. after i learned the job i showed them a strategy on how to get more boxes done. it worked but it was hard work. so they hired me on permentaly with in 7 mo. they move me to night shift to get the same thing done with the night shift crew and it was successful also. with both shift doing 7 to 8 boxes thats 15 to 16 boxes a day we ran out of work to the point to where we only needed 1 shift. my seniority wasnt there so they moved me to another department the other one that no one wanted to do. installing radiators. there THEY were only doing 2 or 2.5 units a day. to make along story short when i got thru with my strategy i was doing 5 a day by myself and 7 with two other helpers. this cause me to have to do a lot of climbing and forceful walking. my heels started hurting real bad when i would go on break and especially when i wake up in the mornings. I told my team leader and he said that auggh its just a heel spur. but he didnt report it. so i told him that i was going to the doctor and he said to let him no what the doctor say. i was diagnosis with bi-lateral plantar fasciitis with severe lower extremeties. i have seen a total of 5 doctors that stated and charted that it was job related. so my employer sent me to have ime. the company doctor stated that i do have the injury but it didnt come from the job. but he stated in his notes that he didnt think that i could work on hard surfaces for a prolonged perion of time. so my atty ask if he think that the surface at my job aggravated my condition. the company doctor answered and said that walking is a part of life. and that it didnt come from the job. 5 doctors said yes it did and 1 the company doc said it didnt. what would you do in this situation?

    • ANSWER:

  14. QUESTION:
    Anyone have Plantar Fasciitis?
    I’m 18 years old and I’ve had plantar fasciitis for three years. I’ve seen two different doctors and have done pretty much every treatment option available which ranges from physical therapy, cortisone injections, pills, and much more. Only treatment I haven’t tried is ESWT and surgery.

    I’ve had it for a very long time now and I’ve posted questions asking about plantar fasciitis several times before. I figured it wouldn’t hurt to try asking again.

    If you’ve ever had plantar fasciitis before, how did you cure it?

    I’m posting this in the Running section because this was an injury that I got three years ago (from running) and I’m hoping runners can answer this question better than the injury section. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar Fasciitis is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some people, heel spurs. It can also result in arch pain. Plantar Fasciitis is often caused by abnormal pronation of the foot and improper arch support. Contributing factors are weight gain, intense physical activity, jobs that require a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces, or shoes with poor arch support.

      Research has found that a combination of proper exercises and arch support by wearing orthotic insoles can provide effective relief for plantar fasciitis.

      An explanation of the importance that proper arch support plays in controlling over-pronation, and some stretching exercises for relief are provided in the links below:

  15. QUESTION:
    can I continue to play soccer with plantar fasciitis?
    I’m 36 and hadn’t played soccer since high school. I joined a recreational league and felt fine during our first game. The next day the pain in my left heel was unbearable when I stepped out of bed. It gets better after about 20 minutes. I’m been walking with arch supports in my shoes. I went to the doctor and he told me that I had plantar fasciitis. He said to take it easy, stretch and it should heal up in 11 months. I asked him if I could continue to play and he said let’s see how it heals. That was pretty vague.

    I want to know if anyone has experienced this and has continued to play. OR what type of treatment did you seek and how did it affect your practicing or playing….or did you just stop altogether?

    Thanks for any advice you can give.

    • ANSWER:
      Regular gentle stretching of the plantar fascia and the calf muscles will help the most in the long run, but an injection of cortisone gets the fastest relief. You can do stretching on a stairway with the ball of the feet on a step as you let the heels down below that level. A lot of athletes use a “ProStretch®” device to stretch more effectively, but you’ll have to wait until it’s cooled off a bit first or you might make it worse. Heel pads in the shoes help by taking some of the tension off the bottom of the foot so you don’t get as much force on the calf or the plantar fascia. More complicated shoe inserts don’t offer much additional help.

      Other reliable info (in medical jargon, but with a further link to plain-English info) is at this link:

      http://www.aafp.org/afp/20051201/2237.html

  16. QUESTION:
    Large Bone Spur Plantar Fasciitis?
    I am overweight. I have been very active in sports all my life. About 4 years ago it seemed my heels began to be sore. It is primarly the bottom of both heels. I saw a doctor 4 years ago and they said I was fine. Over time, I continued sports, but the pain has increased and in turn, I did less and less activity. I do wear shoe inserts in every shoe and have switched to tennis shoes daily. I have been seeing a podiatrist. We have taped my feet for two weeks and no improvement. He had me try antinflammatory and no improvement. Chances of me losing weight are little to none. He is suggesting surgery. I have two large bone spurs, one on each foot. He is suggesting laproscopy. I truly want to participate in sports again, but the heel pain prevents it.

    Has anyone had this surgery? Please share your experiences. Of course surgery is a last cause, but I worry that if I wait more years, things will continue to get worse. Any advice? What questions should I ask my foot doctor today when I see him?

    • ANSWER:
      Has your podiatrist recommended custom orthotics? If not, ask about them. I have plantar fasciitis, heel spurs and an osteochodroma (benign bone tumour in the knee joint). Before I got custom orthotics I could barely walk. Two weeks after getting them, I spent a full week at Walt Disney World. As long as I wear the custom orthotics every day, I can handle the odd social occasion with high heels. Beats the heck out of not walking at all.

  17. QUESTION:
    I need help with my Plantar fasciitis!?
    ive had this my whole life. It happens with shoes with arch support, without arch support, with some arch support, or with high arch support. It happens with every shoe, but it less common with shoes with no arches. My mom says its because i wear shoes with no arch support but i keep telling her it hurts to have high arches cause im flat footed. Ive had it since i was 4. It happens mostly when i go to the mall, airports, or theme parks. It feels like a ripping and tearing on my arch!

    I dont know what to do! Im asking my mom to help me treat this but she says im just not taking care of my feet by wearing the wrong shoes! She bought my shoes when i was 4, and i even had it then, so idk why shes complaining! But im not sure what to do, because its really aggirvating when i cant go to a themepark without it happening to me.

    Ive seen a doctor about this but they just keep telling me to wear arch support or to not walk a lot. But its not fair that other people can walk for more than 30 minutes without this happening to them. What do i do?! HELP!
    i wear the same shoes everyday (just different colors) my doctor said to change the shoes i wear to exercise different muscles. It happens due to overworking my feet. It alawys happens at 6 flags or at airports and stuff

    • ANSWER:
      Part of the problem may be if you change shoes throughout your day. Everytime you change your shoes height you use the feet muscles differently; that can bring on the Plantar Fasciitis pain.

      When you get the pain try to rest your feet a little and try not to walk too much further than the pain allows you. If you are not walking much you may be gaining weight. That can add to the problem so try to exercise by swimming or cycling [if you are able to cycle despite the pain.

      Additional: As you wear the same style shoes and the pain is linked to prolonged walking it sounds to me that it is mostly shock initiating the pain.

      Try consulting a Podiatrist to have specialist insoles made, or buy some silicone or gel insoles. If you place the gels under any arch support you may get the best result.

      btw unless your Doctor is a Podiatrist I would be wary of that exercise reccomendation. Pain is a warning that something is wrong!

  18. QUESTION:
    I have foot pain from running in a 5k race. Has anyone had the same symptoms and if so what is the treatment?
    I have been running for one year consistently (with no pain). I am 25 yrs old (190 lbs). Three weeks ago I ran in a 5k race. In the 5k, I ran normal until the end of the race. At the end I sprinted as fast as I could for ¼ of a mile. Once the race was over I felt good with no pain. At home, I took my shoes off, took 10 steps and began to feel pain only in my right foot (on the back outside not on the ball) every step I took. I thought I pulled a muscle and didn’t think much about it. After limping two weeks and taking an entire bottle of ibuprofen, I began to feel better and was able to walk without a limp and not noticeable pain. After the two weeks I also played some tennis and with hardly any pain. Today (3 weeks later) I decided to run again (2 miles). Halfway through the run (1 mile) I felt the pain again. My foot again is very tender. Do I need new shoes? Is this Plantar Fasciitis. What about flat feet? Should I see a doctor? Will it ever go away? Please help.
    I have been running for one year consistently (with no pain). I am 25 yrs old (190 lbs). Three weeks ago I ran in a 5k race. In the 5k, I ran normal until the end of the race. At the end I sprinted as fast as I could for ¼ of a mile. Once the race was over I felt good with no pain. At home, I took my shoes off, took 10 steps and began to feel pain only in my right foot (on the ulna side, 3 in. below the ball of my ankle, on the inner arch) every step I took. I thought I pulled a muscle and didn’t think much about it. After limping two weeks and taking an entire bottle of ibuprofen, I began to feel better and was able to walk without a limp and not noticeable pain. After the two weeks I also played some tennis and with hardly any pain. Today (3 weeks later) I decided to run again (2 miles). Halfway through the run (1 mile) I felt the pain again. My foot again is very tender. Do I need new shoes? Is this Plantar Fasciitis. What about flat feet? Should I see a doctor? Will it ever go away

    • ANSWER:
      You should definitely go see your nearest podiatrist for an evaluation and get x-rays to make sure nothing is broken. It could be a stress fracture or it could be tendonitis. Judging from where it is like the back of the foot (maybe near the ankle), it’s more likely tendonitis. You need to rest it again, ice, and Advil. New shoes will help a little, but go see a podiatrist to get evaluated. You may need some orthotics to help with your running so that area doesn’t get stressed or overused. He/she will watch you walk and see how you function, this will determine what type of orthotic and other treatments are necessary. Once it’s determined what is causing your pain, then yes, it’ll go away. Plantar fasciitis is more on the bottom of your foot near the heel bone or in the arch.

  19. QUESTION:
    Has Anyone had a Plantar Fasciotomy done ?
    I’ve had plantar Fasciitis since feb of 09′ and ive done everything to fix it !!! my only other option is to get surgery. Im going to see my doctor the 17th about it, sign the papers ect … my surgery is june 4th but im going nuts because im not sure whats going to be the “after effects” because me and my doctor havent really talked more about it ! so i was wondering :

    – the recovery time ?
    – am i going to be using crutches after ?
    – hows the pain ?

    and whatever else you can tell me about it.
    Thanks in advance !!!!
    i will be talking to the doctor more about it on the 17th, but nothing until then … just need some advice to put my mind at ease until then !!! also i have it in both feet but shes doing 1 at a time, thank goodness !!!!

    • ANSWER:
      - the recovery time ? Mine was about 30 Days
      - am i going to be using crutches after ? I used crutches for about two weeks
      - hows the pain ? Not to bad

      I would suggest to you that talking with your doctor would be a very wise thing to do. My doctor was an idiot.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can I go to general doctors for a foot problem?
    I may have plantar fasciitis or something similar but I don’t have any foot doctors close by so I’m wondering if I could just go to my normal doctors and they can x-ray and stuff and see what’s wrong with my foot, can I do that?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. If you need more help than they can give, they can refer you to a podiatrist.

  21. QUESTION:
    what should i expect?
    i have to go see a foot doctor because i might haave plantar fasciitis. what should i expect at my appintment?

    • ANSWER:
      podiatrist or orthopedist?

      Im assuming a podiatrist… you go in, take off your shoes and socks… sit in a comfy chair much like a dentist chair and they look at your feet.. aks you lots of questions.. examine them…

      they might xray if they feel its a bone issue but planta fascitis will be obviuous to them on examination. Often this is treated with a contraption that holds your foot in a stretched position that you can sleep in at night if it’s bad. More often than not, they will give you some foot exercises to do to help it out and ways to maange the pain.

  22. QUESTION:
    I need help with a Foot Nerve Problem?
    So for about 5 months now ive had this tingling sensation in my right foot in the arch ONLY. Its dissappeared for months at a time and then has always come back for about a month, Now is the month that it came back and its really irritating because im trying to join the US Air Force and its holding me back. Its not pain AT ALL. Just feels like my foot is asleep whenever i walk on it or run. I have to stop every few steps if the tingling gets to intense or my foot will sit there and jump and twitch from being overused. My right leg has been overused my whole life. I favor that leg mostly, so it could be overused. Ive had an MRI 2 days ago. And it comes back as everything is absolutely fine. Had an Xray 2 days before that (4 days ago) and theres absolutely nothing wrong with the bones, anywhere, no spurs or anything. I dont have Plantar Fasciitis. No doctors can find out whats wrong, Ive been to a podiatrist and a neurologist and nobody can see anything wrong, its only when i walk, doesnt matter what shoe im wearing, the arch support in it, or if im barefoot with socks on. It always does it. Its a stabbing sensation of nerves that make my foot twitch and tingle along my arch on the bottom of my right foot. Ive researched this a lot and i cant find any results of anyone having this same problem, its always assosciated with an injury of some sort, i havent had any injuries at all. Im really frustrated that this is holding me back in life and it is just some random feeling that comes and goes as it pleases. Please help me as much as you can. Any answers are answers, Thanks.
    – Landon
    But i don’t have any strange feeling in my toes or in that region ONLY in my arch, thats it. Does it lead to neuroma?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      Mortons answer: Squeeze your foot together, if it hurts then it is a neuroma. Easily distinguishable (even a local anaesthtic to the area will give a positive neuroma sign), but not in the arch.
      —–

      You have only got a few nerves that go around the arch so it is simple to knock out some of them and find out what is causing the problem. Nerve conduction tests would also show some signs of nerve trouble.

      The arch is a complex area. XRay will show bony problems if taken at the proper angle and an MRI will show tissue, if there is inflammation etc.

      There are a few things it could be:

      - You might have a trapped nerve, which causes sensations and “parathesia” this would give credence to the fact of when you walk. Maybe a branch of one of the main nerves. When your foot is asleep I would see exactly where it is asleep, if it is the whole foot (top and bottom) then it is the nevers further up the leg rather than in the foot- before they split. If it is a certain area, draw where, or describe where because nerves have routes and innervate certain areas only. So for example, inbetween the big toe and 2nd toe is a small area that one nerve supplies, and no other.

      - Plantar Fasciitis could still be a problem and undiagnosed, especially if you have been favoring that leg the most. But this wouldn’t account for the “asleep” part.

      - One of the bones pressing on the nerves. Remember your foot is small and crammed with a lot of stuff in it. Bone issues have always been a problem and wouldn’t show up on XRay. Pressing around and finding the bone is the only option, which they should have done- try to illicit the pain in a controlled environment.

      All the best

  23. QUESTION:
    Why does my foot hurt?
    At first I thought it was plantar fasciitis, but now I’m not sure. The sole or bottom of my foot doesn’t hurt at all, it’s my Achilles tendon that gets sore after I run. I have noticed that if I am sitting down and move my foot around in the air, I can’t reproduce the same pain. It doesn’t even hurt when I rub it. It’s only when I start walking again. Any idea what it could be?

    Please don’t tell me to go see a doctor, that’s already in the works.

    • ANSWER:
      Could be strain of the tendon when trying to run or stand. I had some issues with my tendon in my left foot several years ago because of some exercises I did in P.E. as a kid. My leg was not used to the exercise and ended up having pain for a while.

  24. QUESTION:
    My calves hurt so much for no reason?!?
    For about have a year my calves have been sore and at random times through out the day it just spasms with pain! Sometimes I cant even walk, it hurts so much. I have Plantar fasciitis, so I think it might be linked to that. Has anyone else had this problem? Should I go see a doctor? Any advice?

    • ANSWER:
      I think a podiatrist should be able to help, but you have to make sure you go to one who’s highly recommended. Well I dont know, since it’s the calves ask a regular doctor a suppose.

  25. QUESTION:
    Sudden pain in my heel?
    Two days ago, I suddenly developed some pain in my right heel. I was wearing wet flipflops at the time. I figured I pulled a muscle. The pain seems to ease with motrin. I looked online and it keeps saying its Plantar fasciitis. But I am not exactly “athletic” nor am I overweight. Do you think it’s possible I just pulled something? Has this happened to anyone else? I will be seeing a doctor – but you know it takes a while for an appointment. Just curious to see if this has happened to anyone else.
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      First of all I am sorry that you have this pain which prevents you from walking normally.

      In order to help you diagnose your condition better, please answer these questions:

      1) Is it sensitive to the touch/press on your heel?
      2) Do you have high or low arches in your feet?
      3) Is there any redness visible?
      4) Where exactly is the pain located in the heel (Back/Bottom/Side)?
      5) Do you have “extra” pain when you first get up in the morning and take a few steps?
      6) What kind of shoes you usually wear?
      7) Did you start any sport activity lately?

      Here are a few things you can do right now:

      1) In general you should be completely resting your foot for a while – Minimize walking / standing and see if there is some improvement.

      2) Ice your heel at least 4 times a day, either by applying ice directly or by rolling a frozen bottle under your heel and arch when you sit down.

      3) Massage the area to speed up healing.

      4) Try to wear supportive/comfortable shoes when you are not at work.

      Again, if you can answer my questions I would be happy to assist you further.

      You can write to me directly if you prefer, my email is in my Yahoo profile or itaiw@yahoo.com

      Good Luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    Pains in my foot!!! :(?
    I get these pains in my foot like after a month of wearing shoes with no support *skate shoes converse sandals flats* thats like all i wear… and i had these pains in the sole of my foot during soccer season and my parents said it is probably plantar fasciitis. I stopped wearing the special supports i put in my shoes and they are really hurting again (its basketball season). They hurt wostly in the morning and when i do a lot of walking! Do you think it is plantar fasciitis? what should i do to help my feet!!?!?!?!?! anddd finally should i see the doctor?

    • ANSWER:

  27. QUESTION:
    Getting bad pain in foot, help?
    What I’m wondering is, I have a pain on the right foot on the right side just below the baby toe. It’s tender to touch and hurts a lot to arch my foot kind of like standing on your tipy toes. The pain is mostly from below the baby toe to about half way up the side of the foot. The pain had stopped for a while and I thought it had gone away but I wore a pair of heels last night and my foot by the end of the night was hurting so much that it was probably a 9/10 almost as if I had broken something. Now this morning it’s subsided but it’s still there tender to touch but not as bad to arch the foot. I’m not sure if I should put ice on it or if this is something that is common with Plantar Fasciitis which I had last year, could it be related? I could go see my doctor and ask him to send me to a specialist but that could take forever. I would like to know if there’s anything I could possible do now or if anyone else has ever heard of this before.
    I don’t normally wear high heels usually a loafer with a 1 inch heel. But this night it was a 4 inch heel and it felt like there was pressure on the sides of the foot in the boot but it was comfortable at first but throughtout the night it got worse if I walked on it, it didn’t seem to hurt as much but the moment I sat down it was unbearable.
    Sorry I mean if I walked on it, it seemed better but when I sat down it hurt the most.

    • ANSWER:

  28. QUESTION:
    foot pain help in diagnosing?
    i have horrible feet from dance and from just walking in general
    i was told i had plantar fasciitis and got arch supports in 8th grade now currently a senior in high school i wonder if i have done more to my feet

    i still dance and in no way am i giving it up until i have to but this is starting to disturb me

    the arches in my feet have been tearing alot though the years
    i am to the point where clear muscle bundles have combined in my arch of my foot creating large indents in other areas. the plantar fasciitis is clearly pronounced even when the foot is limp on the bottom of my foot. THIS however i cannot find on the internet.

    if someone knows of what this is i would greatly appreciate the knowledge
    i just hope i won’t have to see the doctor and have surgery

    THANKS AGAIN
    i have no numbness in my foot and i stretch alot from my dancing so my other muscles aren’t tight

    • ANSWER:
      You mentioned arch supports, which is the obvious first response. You may also want to do some foot exercises… podiatry research has found that a combination of proper exercises and arch support by wearing orthotic insoles can provide effective relief for this type of condition.

      Please follow the exercises and read plantar fasciitis information found at the links below:

  29. QUESTION:
    Physical Therapists or other doctor/sports people PLEASE answer?
    Ok, I’m in track, I’m in ninth grade, and I pulled or strained my hamstring Monday, March 15. It has now been over a week and I’m still in pain. I can jog lightly, but can not sprint, I’m a hurdler, sprinter, long jumper and high jumper, currently, I am not very flexible, but I’m still fast, I don’t mean to talk about myself or brag, what I meant by that was that I hear that sometimes faster people have a tendecy to hurt themselves more because of more stress on the body, plus I’m not flexible.

    I was also wondering if it is possible that it could be somethine other than a pull or strain. Examples, something weird like plantar fasciitis, Sever’s disease, or internal impingement of the shoulder, I have had those 3 before, and the cause was mostly because of not being flexible, being too tight. Is there anything like that only in the hamstring area.

    Also, I have been seeing the trainer, recieved ultrasound treatment one day, and many massages, heat pads, heating, I’ve been icing every night, Following the R.I.C.E. guideline I have also been getting in hot tubs, stretching more lately, and doing a lifting routine with the trainer.

    I just need some way to get better, my first track meet is next Tuesday, and I haven’t really been able to practice for a week and a half now, I need to get back as quick as possible, pain free, I just need some input, THANK YOU

    • ANSWER:
      Continue to do what you are doing especially ultra sound treatment and try going to a physical therapist for rehab. The time it takes for your hamstring to heal depends on the severity of the strain. Since you hurt yourself march 15 and it still hurts jogging it shows that you need to let it rest for some time (i know you don’t wanna hear that). Racing/jumping too soon may make it worse especially since you do a lot of events that are explosive. If I were you I wouldn’t compete Tuesday. Many of my teammates have strained there hamstrings (especially the sprinters) and they were out for about a month. Not saying you will be out that long but it is a possibility. Btw I am a division 1 college runner in case you were wondering. O and its not very likely that it can be something other than a hamstring strain.

  30. QUESTION:
    Do I have a stress fracture in my foot?
    I went to the doctor 2 weeks ago about pain in the ball of my right foot. The doctor said it was “Metatarsalgia” and gave me anti-inflamitories. Last week it got worse. Got a second opinion and that doctor said it was “plantar fasciitis”. Might be a stress fracture but an x-ray won’t see it. This week it’s worse yet and starting to swell. I can still walk on it but by night I’m heavy on the ice and even using crutches. Now the top of my foot is sore too. Does it sound like a break? Or am I being a wuss?

    • ANSWER:
      I’ve had 2 stress fractures before. One in my wrist and another in my back. If you can walk on it, it’s most likely not a break. I was in gymnastics and i just remember it being a sharp pain that would come the more pressure or stress i put on it. I would ask your doctor about getting a bone scan. That’s what i did and it detected the stress fracture in my back when the x-ray couldn’t.

  31. QUESTION:
    How long until I know if the orthotics are working?
    I have just been fitted for a new pair of semi rigid orthotics from a great sports medicine facility.They are for bi-lateral plantar fasciitis that I have had for maybe four years on and off. The doctor said that I might also have some nerve entrapment issues. Both feet do tingle right at the very top of my medial arches and I have tinel’s sign. He also said that sometimes plantar fasciitis ‘swelling’ causes the nerve to be compressed so we don’t really know if I have tarsal tunnel or if it’s the swelling the the fasciitis, at least not until we see how it goes with the orthotics. I have had a negative nerve conduction study.
    How long do you think I would need to wear the orthotics until I know if they are helping? It’s been almost a week and there is still some bi-lateral pain yet it’s a little less than I have experienced before. I also do stretching exercises and icing daily.
    I have seen three podiatrists and two orthopedic surgeons already!

    • ANSWER:
      It can take about 4 weeks to be able to tell if your feet will adjust. If you still notice the pain after about 4 weeks or so then they may need to be readjusted.

      If that still doesn’t work I would recommend consulting a Podiatrist (a doctor that diagnoses and treats diseases, disorders and problems with the feet such as PF) for an additional opinion on your foot situation to see what they say.

  32. QUESTION:
    How much is it worth and what would you do if it was you?
    i have pain in both feet. i went to the doctor and without doing any tests, he told me that i have plantar fasciitis. He put me in an air cast boot for a total of 16 weeks. The pain never left. So he advise me of my other options. Deal with the pain, or surgery? I chose surgery. Without doing any tests to see what was really wrong, he sent me to pre-oper. and that monday morning i was in the operation room. After surgery he told me that he fix the problem. A couple of months later i was still having pain in both feet the one that i had the surgery on was worse. The doctor then sent me to have an emg. The tech. that done the emg stated that if my doctor would have done the emg first he would have seen that i have tarsa tunnel nerve entrapment, and calcaneal pain and other problems. He describe it to me as having carpa tunnel in the foot from over use at work. So my doctor read the emg to me and stated that NOW he know what the problem is and that he was gonna reschedule me for another surgery to fix it. I got a second and a third opinon and they stated that my doctor has cut some nerves that should not have been cut. and that i will never be able too work again. The other doctors ran an MRI and comfirmed that the emg was accurate. And they dont see why he would do surgery before finding out what the deagnosis were? now i am suing him for mal practice. how much is it worth or would you just let it go?

    • ANSWER:
      I am so very sorry this happened to you. Of course, you must sue. as for the amount, I have no idea. I would not accept that you can never work. I will suggest something very extreme, but it is something to consider. If you have your foot amputated, there are such excellent prosthetics these days. Think about that extreme choice, but it might give you back your painless life. Good luck; please do not take this suggestion as a callous comment. I am serious.

  33. QUESTION:
    help! severe pains from feet to legs to back….?
    hello,

    I’m in the army reserves and during some training i got severe pains starting in my feet going into my shins, knees, hips and back…i went to what they call sick call and they said i have plantar fasciitis, which matches my symptoms.

    I went to a military doctor but they said nothing was wrong with me, but of course i knew there was because i feel pain…i do believe he did say that because im getting ready to deploy soon, and he thought i was trying to get out of it, and of course i am not. i want to be healthy for when i do deploy so i dont let my team down and have to leave when i get there if this gets worse…

    so i went to a cilvilian doctor who prescribed me medication for my condition and gave me a prescription to get braces for my feet and soles for my shoes. unfortunately i have to go back to a military doctor to get a refferal to get the braces because tricare doesnt cover that…

    what im concerned about is whether the pains im getting is more serious than what these doctors are taking it as…i dont want to go to iraq and end up ruining my feet because people are taking it lightly…from what i read online, those who have the symptoms i have, have a serious case and have to get surgery…if thats the case and if thats well known, why doesnt someone give me an xray and see?

    please someone give me their opinions on this, i really need some advice since i only have about three weeks before i go to iraq…thank you

    • ANSWER:
      This sounds to me its a back problem! I too have exactley the same symptons and in my case I have prolapsed discs.Pain starts from the feet then moves up my legs into my hips and then in my back.It took me 9 months to get an xray and when they did the problem had spread into 3 discs.The best painkiller is ibuprofen i found and Nortryptilin which I now take permantley.I cannot be operated on as I would loose the use of my left leg,I have had this problem for 18yrs.I do find gentle exercise helps but in your case the training is hard which I could not handle.You will just have to be adament with the drs and keep pushing as i had to.I wish you all the luck in Iraq and keep safe.

  34. QUESTION:
    Lower back and feet pains?
    I have been having problems with my feet for some time now (2 years or so) one or the other foot keeps giving out, if asked how i would say it feels when this happens i,d say its like a very badly sprained ankle only the pain is more at the top of my foot/feet and not really on my ankle, this only happens to 1 foot in any time but the same to both feet i cant really say how ofton as it just happens there is no time limet it could be daily it could happen weekly or monthly i think it depends on how much walking i do or for how long i walk… about 12 months ago i started getting really bad lower back pains around my lower back and lumbar regions as well, the pain is not always there but can be quite painfull when it is, i have pain in my back now every morning but it can go after a while once up and about out of bed, the back pain does come back some times when walking and sometimes when just standing up and not really doing nothing, one time i was just stood up planting some veg into pots and the pain come on so bad i had to leave it and go lie down and wait for the pain to go with the use of pain killers, i feel like if i lean forward the helps a bit,

    my doctor has sent me for xrays on my ankles and lower back but still dont know what it is wrong, when i had my lower back xray my doctor said to me it seems like its just normal wear and tear that is the cause of the pain in my back (his words)

    i’am 45 years old not 75 and i do not belive that this is the problem with my back as i,am not that old ,

    i,ve seen a foot clinic as the bottom of my feet have also been hurting and my doctor said it could be plantar fasciitis and when i got there they could not look at my feet as my right foot gave out and it was to painfull to let them bend it about to look at it properly, the foot clinic sent me back to my doctor saying that they thought my feet problems were nerve related pains and that if my back was hurting it could well affect my feet if it were a nerve problem

    it just seems like am not getting anywhere with my doctor with my feet or back problems and would like to know if theres any medical type of person out there that may be able to advise me on what i could do next or what it could be please.

    Thanks for any help and if you need to know more i will answer questions here or in a PM

    • ANSWER:

  35. QUESTION:
    I didn’t tell my employer about a physical disability… What should I do now?
    I was recently hired at a local gas station/convenience store (United Dairy Farmers). Recent as in like three days ago. I had been looking for a job close to home for about four months with no luck because I don’t have a car or license, and needed a job within walking distance. So when I went for the interview, I was so anxious about getting the job that I wasn’t thinking about physical issues that might come up, and neglected to mention a very large factor in my ability as an employee:

    I have an extremely severe case of overpronation in my ankles, and by association, an equally severe case of plantar fasciitis – which is basically when the tendons in your feet get so tight and inflamed that the pain can become unbearable when you’re on your feet too long. I have custom orthotics to help with the problem, but they certainly don’t eliminate the pain. I have also received shots in my feet to reduce inflammation, and have had recommendations suggesting reconstructive surgery to “build” a proper arch in my feet. So as you can clearly see, my condition is very, VERY severe, and I’m only 19.

    The past jobs I’ve worked at knew about my foot condition beforehand and accommodated me – they would only schedule me for 5~6 hour shifts so that I was only working long enough to start feeling pain, but not long enough to where it would become agonizing. Also at these jobs, they understood that sometimes I would need to rest my feet every couple of hours for 10 or 15 minutes just to let the tendons relax so the pain would lessen.

    Now, I’ve just started work at this gas station, but I neglected to tell the store manager that I had this issue. He has no idea. I only mentioned that I had “feet problems” after an assistant manager had been talking about back problems and asked me if I had any. They don’t understand how severe the problem is, and because I never told them about it, they’ve scheduled me for eight hour shifts in which I CANNOT sit down… which is a major issue. After 6 hours of constant standing and moving around, the pain is near crippling. I can’t even begin to imagine what eight hours will feel like. And I still have to walk home afterward.

    I have my first eight hour shift tomorrow and I don’t know what to do. I know that the pain will be approaching a level of agony by the time the sixth hour rolls around – maybe even BEFORE then! – but I don’t want to lose my job. I spent FOUR months looking for one! But I know that staying on my feet too long like this will only make my condition worse, and I’m afraid that I’ll end up severely injuring myself on the job, like rolling my ankle and tearing a ligament (I have done this before just walking down the street).

    Should I tell my manager about my issue tomorrow when I go in? Is there something I can do that will allow me to keep my job, but work hours that I can actually handle? Do I need a note from a doctor saying I can only work a certain number of hours? If I produced such a note, would that be grounds enough to fire me as an “unable” worker?
    @answerers:
    I’ve never mentioned a disability before in a job interview, even for previous jobs. I was hired first and then the topic came up in conversation and they worked with me.

    I don’t understand how I was being dishonest. My manager never asked me if I had a disability, nor did he ask whether or not I was physically able to work long shifts. If he didn’t expressly ask for information about my physical condition, how is that being dishonest? It simply wasn’t addressed in the actual interview, so it’s not like I went and outright lied to his face about it.

    @second answerer: Thank you for actually answering my question properly. I went back to my orthopedic and she prescribed me an anti-inflammatory to take before work to lessen the swelling and pain, and so far it’s working. But it’s nice to know that I DO have some rights regarding this issue if the meds don’t work out.

    • ANSWER:
      While you neglected to mention the disability, I do not think your employer can fire you. I say this because under the law (Americans with Disabilities Act-ADA) and other state laws, discrimination on the basis of disability is not permitted in most cases. I say most cases here because an employer may claim that a certain job requirement is a “bona fide occupational qualification” (BFOQ) and if you do not have that requirement, discrimination on the basis of that one requirement should be permitted. For example, if part of the job description is that you have to run a mile every day and you cannot even with accomodation, then it would not be discrimination not to hire you, because running is a BFOQ. There is always a gray area. For example, as a gas station attendant, you may need to be on your feet and moving around. However, here is the big “but”: But if your employer can accommodate your disability, it cannot discriminate and defend its actions as a BFOQ. From what you mentioned, previous employers accommodated your needs- so I do not see any reasons this current employer cannot do the same. If your employer fires you on the basis of your disability, you would have a good case to bring before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and applicable courts. Your employer could say, well you lied to us during the interview, but the fact is, your disability wasn’t really “material” to your job. Someone here said you “misrepresented” your disability. True, you did not divulge this fact, but this fact is not “material” to your job performance insofar as hiring (for example, employers cannot ask you about your sexuality, your political beliefs, and many other things). Why should they be able to ask about a disability? The only way I’d see this as “misrepresentation”, which legally is the failure to divulge a MATERIAL fact (material meaning RELEVANT) is if your disability would completely prevent you from performing the required job duties- but clearly it does not.

      I do not know what the best approach here is in terms of dealing with your disability. Given that you are in much pain, and it is likely you will be in need of accommodation, you probably will have to discuss this with your employer. But if you do, know your rights. Be honest. They will obviously not like the fact that you never told them about your disability. But state clearly that you are qualified (which you are!), and that with a little accommodation you can do the job just as anyone else. As long as that applies your employer cannot terminate (fire) you.

      I hope this helps.

  36. QUESTION:
    I cannot walk on my feet…?
    Ok i don’t really know where to start. For about the last 9-10 months i have experienced a terrible pain in both my feet. Basically i can hardly walk, in the mornings i get up and can hardly hold my balance as both feet hurt so much. throughout the day the pain worsens (i work in a warehouse so im on my feet all day) I have been to a few doctors, they say i have Bi-Lateral plantar fasciitis and achelies tendonitis (i have got that after the plantar fasciitis, its because i wasnt walking properly and i made myself alot worse!)

    I see a Oesteopath once a fortnight who is helping me, the only thing is after a few days the pain is coming back just as strong, if not stronger. I Ice my feet as much as i can aswell as do some excersises but this pain is just not going anywhere. i cant think of any accidents or anything that could of started it and im starting to wonder whether it will ever go, anyone got any suggestions or advice on foot pain?

    Many Thanks

    • ANSWER:

  37. QUESTION:
    What should she do?HELP ASAP!?
    My sister has plantar fasciitis, heel pain,etc. She went to the doctors and the hospital several times and She crys all FREAKIN DAY. Have anybody had this before? she says it feels like stabbing in the foot,heel burning, paining, everything.It’s severe. This has been going on for about 2 weeks now first it wasn’t that bad but recently Lord have Mercy! I can’t stand seeing her in that condition. Anybody have any treatment remedies? Cold ice, warm water? Does Epsom/salt water help? please

    • ANSWER:
      If you can find a old glass coke bottle or something of that shape…put it in the freezer…then have her roll it under her foot so that the arch is rolling over it from heel to toe over and over….If she doesn’t have access to a freezer or a glass bottle anything round really a ball or a glass….but the glass bottles frozen seem to work the best…and have her roll it…it is not going to feel great at first but will start to feel better as it stretches….and taking Aleve or another non-steriodal anti inflammatory medication OTC is fine…this worked better then any of the narcotic medications the doctors ever prescribed to me for this same condition ….Good luck to you and her…hope she is back on her feet soon….

  38. QUESTION:
    army doctors vs civilian doctors?
    Im active duty and was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis. It has been going on for 6 months, ive been through 3 cycles of physical therapy, shock wave treatment, and as a last resort was put in a walking boot for a month. None of that helped, i was sent to a orthopedic surgeon and was put in a hard cast. I ended up getting it wet and went to the clinic on base, the army doctors there took the casts off and told me that they didn’t think i needed it and gave me a brace. I called the Specialist that I see and was told to come back to their office and continue treatment through them. What should I do? If im not healed soon, Im going to be facing a discharge. Any ideas????

    • ANSWER:
      Go to the civilian doctor. Most military doctors barley passed med school. The reason they are in the military is because they don’t have to worry about malpractice. Our military produces great soldiers and medics, they should stop there.

  39. QUESTION:
    My wife wants to quit her k job that is supporting the family. Asked once, not enough answers. Help?
    Back in 2002, my wife (21 at the time) and I (20) had our first child. After his birth it took my wife and I 2 years to find a “stable job” to support him under since we both struggled with low paying jobs that we kept getting fired/quit from. From 2003 to 2010 I worked a job that brought in the majority of the income (ending pay was k); meanwhile, my wife was going for her associate’s degree in accounting and working various jobs to help with bills. In April of 2010, I lost my job and fell hard into depression as a result. My wife then took on a job that has supported the family since then. My wife now makes k a year (almost as much as I did) and still gets to see the kids about as much as she would if she was home because they are in school now. But this doesn’t make my wife happy. My wife wants to quit her job and force me back into a career making the household income so she can stay home and get her bachelor’s and play with her girlfriends. Meanwhile, I don’t have ANY college education and since I was FIRED from my last employer, finding a job in Michigan (with 13% unemployment rate in the state and most of that in my area) will be extremely difficult. I have several disabilities that prevent me from working including: generalized anxiety disorder, attention deficient disorder, two fused discs in my back causing me back pain when lifting heavy items, either lactose intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome, anal fissure that gets aggravated due to the irritable bowl syndrome situation, constant anxiety attacks with muscle tension in my back, and lately my feet have been hurting which sounds a lot like Plantar fasciitis… If my health is so terrible, and if she’s already making k, can you explain to me why she would want to be home and push me out into the world to work that high stress and body damaging crap all over again? Emotionally and mentally I’m not a cripple, but physically and psychologically I am. Do you think my wife is being selfish/irrational? Or do you think that I’m being selfish for not doing my Christian duty as being the “man of the house” and “providing for my family” like a real “Man” would do? (Sorry for the attitude but you know all that is a stereotype right?)

    Help me work out a compromise here. I’m running out of ways to tell my wife that I’m not fit to work because to her she sees them as all “lies” even though doctors are the ones saying I have these conditions…

    Just so everyone knows: I do ALL the house chores. I mean ALL of them. The only thing I’ll try to skip out on doing is making dinner because I’m not a good cook. I even take care of the kids 90% of the time while my wife hides in the basement to pay bills, socialize with her girlfriends, and plays games. So don’t assume that all I do is lay around the house; you house wives know what it’s like to take care of a family of 4. Constantly cleaning messes, constantly doing laundry, constantly disinfecting rooms, constantly caring for animals, constantly vacuuming, and all the other things we at home’s do. It’s actually really hard work to keep a house up to “keeping up with the jones’s” standards!!!! So don’t give me this “you’re lazy” bull crap; I work probably harder than her at home! How hard is it to crunch numbers in front of a computer if you’ve been TRAINED to do that? I want to add too that I take care of ALL of my wife’s emotional needs that I can. I rub her back and pop her zits and scrape her skin and massage her body and go OUT of my way to make her life working comfortable/convenient.

    Answer me this: If you had to work but you came home and you were treated like a king/queen, would YOU stop working?

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    My wife wants to quit her k job that is supporting the family because she believes it’s a man’s job to work?
    Back in 2002, my wife (21 at the time) and I (20) had our first child. After his birth it took my wife and I 2 years to find a “stable job” to support him under since we both struggled with low paying jobs that we kept getting fired/quit from. From 2003 to 2010 I worked a job that brought in the majority of the income (ending pay was k); meanwhile, my wife was going for her associate’s degree in accounting and working various jobs to help with bills. In April of 2010, I lost my job and fell hard into depression as a result. My wife then took on a job that has supported the family since then. My wife now makes k a year (almost as much as I did) and still gets to see the kids about as much as she would if she was home because they are in school now. But this doesn’t make my wife happy. My wife wants to quit her job and force me back into a career making the household income so she can stay home and get her bachelor’s and play with her girlfriends. Meanwhile, I don’t have ANY college education and since I was FIRED from my last employer, finding a job in Michigan (with 13% unemployment rate in the state and most of that in my area) will be extremely difficult. I have several disabilities that prevent me from working including: generalized anxiety disorder, attention deficient disorder, two fused discs in my back causing me back pain when lifting heavy items, either lactose intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome, anal fissure that gets aggravated due to the irritable bowl syndrome situation, constant anxiety attacks with muscle tension in my back, and lately my feet have been hurting which sounds a lot like Plantar fasciitis… If my health is so terrible, and if she’s already making k, can you explain to me why she would want to be home and push me out into the world to work that high stress and body damaging crap all over again? Emotionally and mentally I’m not a cripple, but physically and psychologically I am. Do you think my wife is being selfish/irrational? Or do you think that I’m being selfish for not doing my Christian duty as being the “man of the house” and “providing for my family” like a real “Man” would do? (Sorry for the attitude but you know all that is a stereotype right?)

    Help me work out a compromise here. I’m running out of ways to tell my wife that I’m not fit to work because to her she sees them as all “lies” even though doctors are the ones saying I have these conditions…

    Just so everyone knows: I do ALL the house chores. I mean ALL of them. The only thing I’ll try to skip out on doing is making dinner because I’m not a good cook. I even take care of the kids 90% of the time while my wife hides in the basement to pay bills, socialize with her girlfriends, and plays games. So don’t assume that all I do is lay around the house; you house wives know what it’s like to take care of a family of 4. Constantly cleaning messes, constantly doing laundry, constantly disinfecting rooms, constantly caring for animals, constantly vacuuming, and all the other things we at home’s do. It’s actually really hard work to keep a house up to “keeping up with the jones’s” standards!!!! So don’t give me this “you’re lazy” bull crap; I work probably harder than her at home! How hard is it to crunch numbers in front of a computer if you’ve been TRAINED to do that? I want to add too that I take care of ALL of my wife’s emotional needs that I can. I rub her back and pop her zits and scrape her skin and massage her body and go OUT of my way to make her life working comfortable/convenient.

    Answer me this: If you had to work but you came home and you were treated like a king/queen, would YOU stop working?

    • ANSWER:
      If i had to work but came home and was treated like a queen i would not stop working. unless i would still be treated the same way unemployed.
      Put it to her like this. Agree to find a minimum wage job. But she has to keep her job. She would pay the bills while your money would go into an emergency fund or to the bank for later. then while keeping your sucky job (maybe at bk. i dont think you need your back or self respect for that job) you’ll keep looking for one. Eventually you WILL find one. But your wife seems extremely selfish in this situation!! once you guys are sure your financially stable and you have a GOOD job, she can quit her job, OR she can keep it and you guys can all live very comfortably and go on family vacations.
      I hope this is a good solution. I dont have a family of my own or anything so im just going on pure rational thought. I hope things work out for you, i really do.
      If that doesnt you can argue with her that ur the househusband she made you. but im not sure thats a good way to go..
      anyway good luck!!

  41. QUESTION:
    Please..Help.. What is wrong with my feet?
    I’m tired of trying.. I’m tired of seeing different kinds of doctors. I just want somebody with the same symptoms to tell me what they did or get in touch me with me. I feel so alone.

    My symptoms are..Well:

    I can run 10 miles, I can weightlift (Not sure how much longer), I used to be able to walk around but now.. I can’t. It started with me not being able to stand for prolonged periods of time in the army. I got severe foot pain, felt like a burning sensation or a loss of blood. Now.. It has come to point where I can’t go out for a smoke break at work without feeling pain. I used to run a marathon without feeling much pain until afterwards, but now I’m not sure. Definitely, the more circulation, the better.. That, I have figured.

    My feet even hurts when clutching in my car now.. It’s become a serious handicap. I used to be a soldier and a bodybuilder. I’m a bodybuilder, but no longer a soldier.. And I’m getting pain when working out so.. No idea how long I can stay a bodybuilder.

    I don’t want to end up as a wreck. I’ve prayed, I’ve gone to specialists.. I’ve tried everything. Nobody listens and nobody understands. The bottom of my feet HURT BADLY when I stand and has developed to the point where I can’t do SHIT.

    If ANYONE here has symptoms like mine or has anything USEFUL to say (I’ve read PLANTAR FASCIITIS MILLIONS OF TIMES DON’T EVEN MENTION IT, IT’S NOT THAT, DO YOUR RESEARCH). PLEASE.. HELP!
    People here (at least the first 2 answers) are fu*king retarded. OF COURSE I’VE SEEN A PODIATRIST (It’s one of those many kinds of doctors I complain about in the start of this) AND I’VE SEEN ABOUT 20 DOCTORS SO I AM NOT SELF DIAGNOSING YOU FU*KING TWAT. I STATED IN THE START OF THIS THAT I’M TIRED OF DOCTORS NOT KNOWING WHAT THE FU*K IS WRONG WITH ME SO WHAT THE HELL DO YOU THINK!

    • ANSWER:
      i tried to answer you last time about your poor feet last time but the topic closed.i had the same problem.i ended up finding out i was diabetic.diabetic foot pain is like no other.there is help though,on my way out the door to work! more later email me at problemrobin@yahoo.com

      i know how much you suffer son,you NOT ever alone -keep praying to and God bless you till later,we will find you the help you need if this is what it is,okay?soak them for now -epsom salt and tea tree oil is very soothing to mine.

  42. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis?
    I’ve had plantar fasciitis for two years now. I’m only 17 and this injury basically ruined my high school running career (I was a school record holder).

    In the past two years, I’ve:
    stretched
    gotten custom orthotics
    had 10 weeks physical therapy
    iced
    used golf ball
    used a footrubz ball
    gotten a cortisone injection
    taken celebrex
    taken piroxicam
    had steroid patches applied
    used frozen coke bottles
    did the calf stretches
    used prostretch
    new shoes recommended by doctor
    and other medication I don’t even remember the names of
    used night splints

    NOTHING WORKS! I’ve seen two different podiatrists and they’re stumped. Neither one of them thinks surgery is right for me.

    If anyone knows how to cure this, any help would be much appreciated.

    No, I am not over-weight. No where close to it either.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar fasciitis can be difficult to treat but very seldom do my patients not improve with it. First, I would revisit the diagnosis. Is it correct ? Sometimes stress fractures may be present or possibly bone spurs causing the pain. Bone spurs are very common with plantar fasciitis and in most cases it is not the source of the pain, but if you have one, it may the source of your pain.

      Years ago I have seen some surgeons cast the foot for 4 to 6 weeks. (kinda like having the night splint on all the time) There are also ways to tape the foot during activities to reduce your pain.

      By far my best outcomes have been when the night splint is used in conjunction with physical therapy that consisted of ultrasound, friction massage, iontophoresis (steroid patch in therapy) and plantar fascia stretch three times a week. The purpose of the night splint is to keep the ankle from dropping and the plantar fascia tightening up when you are asleep. Do you cross your legs or allow your foot drop when you sit during the day? Do you have sharp pain when you get up from sitting?

      I would try one more round of therapy with the above mentioned treatment protocol.

      I have seen plantar fasciitis mostly resolve in as little as 2-3 weeks with the above treatment, in people who had it for several years, but I can’t guarantee it will work for you.

      Hope that helps.


Plantar Fasciitis Doctors Treat

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia is strained as a result of increased or excessive activity, inadequate foot biomechanics or in combined with the typical aging process. The function of the plantar fascia is to help absorb shock and hold the arch of the foot. The ligament is typically overstretched repeatedly before any pain is obvious. The pain comes from recurring microscopic tears occurring in the plantar fascia, generally where it attaches to the heel bone.

The initial step is to cease the that caused the foot pain. The patient should modify his or her activity or exercise routines to reduce strain on the plantar fascia ligament. You should rest your feet, keep the foot elevated and use ice repeatedly during the first part of treatment. Patients should avoid running and walking, instead go for a bike ride or a swim. Activity levels should be raised slowly as tolerated during the later stages of treatment. Common anti-inflammatory medications such as asprin or ibuprofen may help to reduce soreness, although patients should ensure they seek medical advice before starting any medication.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis?
    i just found out this monday i have plantar fasciitis in boh my feet but i have probably had it for about three months. I play rep soccer so i am constantly on my feet, and when i run is when my feet hurt because of this. So far the last 3 months my feet have been pretty sore, but not bad. But these last 2 weeks (including this week) the pain has been so excruciating its been hard for me to continue with my soccer. my feet become sore after the simplest little run for like 2 minutes. and the pain becomes so bad i feel like i am going to break down and cry. For my plantar fasciitis my doctor recommended getting orthotics which i am going to do, but i havent got them yet so thats why my feet are in pain. i just really want to know why my feet are hurting so bad now even though ive had it so long and i was wondering if i could get some tips on how to prevent this pain or treat it.
    i also forgot to metion that the pain i feel is mainly in the arches of my feet so its super painful.

    • ANSWER:
      I have that and it was just killing me for about a year until I talked to our physical therapist at school (I am a special ed. teacher and am on my feet all day) She gave me a simple exercise to do several times a day and it worked like a charm. I was pain free within 2 days and now whenever I feel it starting back up, I do the exercise and it goes right away. What you do is lean up against a counter or wall with your arms straight and your good leg about a foot from the wall. -You might have to bend that leg a little…Take your bad foot and reach behind as far as you can and put it down straight on the floor with the heel touching the floor. You will feel a strong pull and maybe a little pain in your Achilles tendon at the back of your ankle. Keep the pressure on it for about a minute and relax, then do it several times. Do this whenever you have a few minutes during the day. You are stretching the tendon that connects to the heel that is causing the main pain and I swear it helped me a LOT.

  2. QUESTION:
    How to help treat Plantar fasciitis?
    What is something that can be done to help or relieve pain if i have Plantar Fasciitis? I am not the one who has this but my friend does and they do not have a wrap for there foot. I was trying to find a way to help (At least with the pain) with out having to go to the doctor or anything like that. Sorry i cant go into more detail but apparently the pain is really bad and I don’t doubt it. Ive read a little about it. If its not to much of a bother can someone please explain what this is and does to me and tell me what can be done to help.

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    Should I consider corticosteroid shots for plantar fasciitis?
    I have been having arch pain in both feet for a couple of years. Recently, the pain seems to worsen due to my increased participation in running activities. I have tried the arch support prescribed by my doctor for approximately 1 month but the pain still does not go away. Currently, I am waiting for my appointment with a bone specialist as my previous doctor does not seem to know how to treat my condition and that she suspected that my condition is plantar fasciitis. I have also tried taking painkillers, and applying anti-inflammatory drugs on my painful site but all these does not seem to work. On further research, I found that corticosteroid shots seems to work for a lot of people but complications may develop. Moreover, corticosteroid shots are painful as I have heard from a lot of people and through talks on forums on the web. Now I am at a loss as to what I should do. Can anyone provide me with some advice? Your advice will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for plantar f. and anything that is prescribed just alleviates the pain or numbs it. What could help you is foor gels. Like Dr. Scholls.

  4. QUESTION:
    Plantar fasciitis how… long?!?
    Ok I was recently diagnosed with plantar fasciitis, tuesday to be exact. The doctor said it was very hard to cure. I had already thought I had it so I look up stretches and started doing those, and I’m rolling a frozen can under my feet at night, and soaking it in hot water in the morning just like he told me to. He said it should heal up in about a week, atleast that’s how long my excusal note from gym said. I’m in 9th grade, and I play on a soccer team. I want to get back to the field as soon as possible. Does anyone know how long it will take to go away? It’s EXTREMELY painful, and I want it gone! OH and I had the pain for about a week before I finally went to the doctor…I heard the sooner you start treating it the sooner it heals. So how long will it take to go away and does anyone know any other tips for the pain and faster healing?
    The reason I’m doubting the doc on it healing in a week is because it’s been four days and it still KILLS.

    • ANSWER:
      One source I found in a web search said with the usual treatments most patients find relief within 3 months and 90% within a year.

      It did mention cortisone shots, but said that 2 potentially bad effects could be fat pad atrophy and plantar fascial rupture.

      It also mentioned Extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a new treatment http://orthopedics.about.com/od/footankle/i/shockwave.htm

      But it would be best to correct the problem, instead just treating the pain, by getting shoes that fit properly with proper arch support. I developed something that felt like heel spurs from cheap Walmart shoes. I finally got better quality shoes and the heel pain totally disappeared (years ago, never to return).

  5. QUESTION:
    Doctors/nurses preferably…?
    Is there an effective non-surgical way to treat Plantar fasciitis?

    • ANSWER:
      Rest the foot and apply ice to the affected area. Take ibuprofen or acetaminophen to reduce pain and inflammation and try orthotic inserts to treat the plantar fasciitis. There are also exercises you can do to treat them. If nothing else works, see about getting cortisone shots in the affected area.

  6. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have plantar fasciitis or pttd?
    I am 14 years old and EXTREMELY athletic.
    I have been running 3 miles a day for quite some time now and recently have had pain in my archs and tendons. I go to the doctor next week, but i was doing some research online and these diagnoses seem like what i have. I have also talked to other athletes and they have mention plantar fasciitis and pttd also. I was just hoping someone could tell me how you got it, how to treat it, ect.

    THANKS so much.

    • ANSWER:
      i have it. i think i got it from a combination of things. flat feet, being over weight, and running too much. the only thing that seemed to help was cortisone shots in my feet, which helped me lose some weight, and running with out the extra weight was A LOT better. alas i have gotten outta shape in the last 3 yrs so i’m back to running heavy.
      I’ve found this helps:
      freeze one of those water bottles. and then roll it under your foot. its like an ice massage. it works well. Also the boot helps to keep your foot stretched and it helps with pain in the mornings.

  7. QUESTION:
    I need help with my Plantar fasciitis!?
    ive had this my whole life. It happens with shoes with arch support, without arch support, with some arch support, or with high arch support. It happens with every shoe, but it less common with shoes with no arches. My mom says its because i wear shoes with no arch support but i keep telling her it hurts to have high arches cause im flat footed. Ive had it since i was 4. It happens mostly when i go to the mall, airports, or theme parks. It feels like a ripping and tearing on my arch!

    I dont know what to do! Im asking my mom to help me treat this but she says im just not taking care of my feet by wearing the wrong shoes! She bought my shoes when i was 4, and i even had it then, so idk why shes complaining! But im not sure what to do, because its really aggirvating when i cant go to a themepark without it happening to me.

    Ive seen a doctor about this but they just keep telling me to wear arch support or to not walk a lot. But its not fair that other people can walk for more than 30 minutes without this happening to them. What do i do?! HELP!
    i wear the same shoes everyday (just different colors) my doctor said to change the shoes i wear to exercise different muscles. It happens due to overworking my feet. It alawys happens at 6 flags or at airports and stuff

    • ANSWER:
      Part of the problem may be if you change shoes throughout your day. Everytime you change your shoes height you use the feet muscles differently; that can bring on the Plantar Fasciitis pain.

      When you get the pain try to rest your feet a little and try not to walk too much further than the pain allows you. If you are not walking much you may be gaining weight. That can add to the problem so try to exercise by swimming or cycling [if you are able to cycle despite the pain.

      Additional: As you wear the same style shoes and the pain is linked to prolonged walking it sounds to me that it is mostly shock initiating the pain.

      Try consulting a Podiatrist to have specialist insoles made, or buy some silicone or gel insoles. If you place the gels under any arch support you may get the best result.

      btw unless your Doctor is a Podiatrist I would be wary of that exercise reccomendation. Pain is a warning that something is wrong!

  8. QUESTION:
    Chronic, misdiagnosed foot pain?
    For nearly six years, I have had intense foot pain in both feet. At the onset, I believed the pain to be incredibly painful muscle spasms in the arch of my foot. I was treated for plantar fasciitis, which involved physical therapy and eventually the release of my achilles tendon. This surgery (and physical therapy) was largely ineffective. As the years have passed, the pain has gotten worse. I cannot touch the bottoms of my feet, I cannot walk or stand for long periods of time, I cannot bend my feet in any direction, I must keep them constantly on ice (to numb them), they tingle and get very hot (mostly at night), I wear custom made orthodics in tennis shoes which do not make a difference, although they are better than any other shoe. I cannot be barefoot – I must always wear socks. It has gotten to the point where I just want to cut my feet off! I am beginning to think it is nerve damage, because my mother had terrible foot pain that ended up being nerve damage, and because doctors have ruled out many other possibilities. Sometimes my big toe and the second toe’s muscles (or nerves, I am not sure) stick together, making it impossible for me to pull them apart. Other times, the muscles (again, or nerves) where the ball of my foot meets the arch feel as if they are contracting and will not release. It has severely impacted my life, not letting me run, play a sport, swim, work out, even walk on the beach. It has affected my sleep profoundly as well. Many nights I do not sleep or am awoken by the pain. If anyone has any clue at all as to what this is, I’d appreciate the help.

    • ANSWER:
      Hypersensitivity to touch, paresthesias (tingling), dystonias are signs of neuropathy. It tends to be more common in those who have diabetes, but can also come from chemotherapy, excessive use of alcohol, smoking or the case could be idiopathic (no known cause). I would start with your primary physician.

  9. QUESTION:
    Middle back pain worth the trip or just a pulled mussel?
    Trying to save myself a trip to the doctors here.

    So I have had plantar fasciitis now for the past dunno 3-4 months and some ankle pain.
    The planter fasciitis went away last month. Ankle pain has is also being treated currently.

    Now on the 3rd of this month I noticed some back pain in the middle back region towards the spine. So I’m like probably pulled a mussel. A week or two later I’m getting a sharp back pain in the same area and some lower back pain that comes and goes. Mostly not there though. I woke up one morning It felt like I worked the crap out of my legs. I was still able to get around but spent that moaning resting.
    That was about 5 days ago my legs have not been weak since.

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not sure why pulling a clam would constitute going to the doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mussel

  10. QUESTION:
    Will I be able to go on Pointe agian?
    I have been on Pointe for two months, but I have developed an irritation in my left arch, it is highly likely it is a condition called Plantar Fasciitis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantar_fasciitis) although I have not been to the doctor for clarification as of yet, although the symptoms do match what I am having.
    What I want to know is, how do they treat it, and will I be able to go on Pointe again afterwards or continue Ballet? Or is down to how bad it is and how soon I seek treatment?
    Thanks,
    Vicky xx

    • ANSWER:
      Hi
      There are many things you can do to treat your plantar fasciitis. I had plantar fasciitis for about a year and I discovered that treatment is individual. Things that work for one will not necessarily work for the other. The good news is that you have many treatments you can try but you must be persistent and patient.
      I have followed a good plantar fasciitis treatment review website in:

      http://www.plantar-fasciitis-elrofeet.com/How_is_Plantar_Fasciitis_Treated.html

      There are many self care treatments ideas in there but I think you should consult a podiatrist before do something.
      Take care

  11. QUESTION:
    What can be the cause of the pain in my feet?
    Hi. I beg you to read the whole text!

    I am a 19, soon 20 year old male and I work in the armed forces.

    My job requires me to stand for prolonged periods, walk and run a lot and I love my job, but I can’t take the pain much longer!

    Describing the pain is hard for me. It is sort of a burning sensation, but the best way to explain it is if I tell you that it feels like the blood is being cut off to my feet!

    The pain is all around the feet.. The heel, the pads and everywhere, sometimes up to the toes too, when I walk for long distances.
    The pain is only in the feet. Not anywhere else and there is no other sort of pain following it.
    This has been a problem for at least 2-3 years (Maybe longer, since I only really noticed it now. Haven’t worked standing and walking so long ever). It is not just ”getting used to standing” as I have been in the armed forces now for 6 months.

    I have experienced what Plantar Fasciitis patients experiment, where they feel pain in the morning, but I rarely get that.

    I’ve been thinking if it is Plantar Fasciitis (Heel spur) or Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. I’m quite sure now that it is not Plantar Fasciitis, as I’ve been treated with Shock wave Therapy at 4 bar, around 3500 hits. I barely feel any pain but in small areas, and it is supposed to be painful. Also the treatment has not helped at all (had it done twice).

    I don’t understand the symptoms of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome, as they supposedly vary from patient to patient..So I am not sure whether it could be that..

    No doctor seems to fully understand what my condition is, which leads me to believe this is some exotic syndrome of some sort.

    If I stand for about 20 minutes, it starts getting slightly painful and gradually builds. After a short and easy work day (A short and easy work day is a 8 hour day with little or no physical activities, but much standing) my feet will be hurting a lot.

    Please, if you can.. Help me!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you say you “stand for prolonged periods, walk and run a lot”. Starting with the most common possible cause, is your footwear (size, sole cushioning, tightness of shoelaces) proper for your activity?
      Have you noticed an uneven wearing-out of your shoe soles (that could point to over pronation / supination of your feet)?
      Do you have fallen arches (walk barefoot across a damp floor and study the footprints to check)
      A nutritional deficiency in the armed forces is unlikely, but up your quota of Vitamin C & B-complex containing foods and see if that helps.
      Ask for a (temporary) transfer to a less physically demanding schedule and note any relief you get; it’s a way of eliminating your present activity as the cause.
      If all else fails, get referred to a neurologist for nerve conduction / electromyography studies and anything else suggested, and be sure to discuss in detail any symptoms like tingling, heat sensations, balance problems etc.
      All the best

  12. QUESTION:
    Pain in my feet! A problem that is ruining my life! Please, if you know anything about the subject, help me!?
    Hi. I beg you to read the whole text!

    I am a 19, soon 20 year old male and I work in the armed forces.

    My job requires me to stand for prolonged periods, walk and run a lot and I love my job, but I can’t take the pain much longer!

    Describing the pain is hard for me. It is sort of a burning sensation, but the best way to explain it is if I tell you that it feels like the blood is being cut off to my feet!

    The pain is all around the feet.. The heel, the pads and everywhere, sometimes up to the toes too, when I walk for long distances.
    The pain is only in the feet. Not anywhere else and there is no other sort of pain following it.
    This has been a problem for at least 2-3 years (Maybe longer, since I only really noticed it now. Haven’t worked standing and walking so long ever). It is not just ”getting used to standing” as I have been in the armed forces now for 6 months.

    I have experienced what Plantar Fasciitis patients experiment, where they feel pain in the morning, but I rarely get that.

    I’ve been thinking if it is Plantar Fasciitis (Heel spur) or Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome. I’m quite sure now that it is not Plantar Fasciitis, as I’ve been treated with Shock wave Therapy at 4 bar, around 3500 hits. I barely feel any pain but in small areas, and it is supposed to be painful. Also the treatment has not helped at all (had it done twice).

    I don’t understand the symptoms of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome, as they supposedly vary from patient to patient..So I am not sure whether it could be that..

    No doctor seems to fully understand what my condition is, which leads me to believe this is some exotic syndrome of some sort.

    If I stand for about 20 minutes, it starts getting slightly painful and gradually builds. After a short and easy work day (A short and easy work day is a 8 hour day with little or no physical activities, but much standing) my feet will be hurting a lot.

    Please, if you can.. Help me!
    Forgot to say that I have tried the following:

    Gotten several different insoles, everything from heel cups to custom made expansive soles.

    Shock Wave Therapy at 4 bar, 3500 hits.

    Anti Inflammation drugs.

    Can’t think of anything else.

    Remember that I have to wear military boots on the job, so I can not switch shoes. But it doesn’t matter because it doesn’t matter what type of shoes I am wearing, it still hurts.
    I have had it for 3 years. I doubt it will have to be amputated.. Why do you think that?
    I certainly do not have a B12 deficiency since I eat fish, meat and eggs every day.

    But thanks for your answer!
    Happyjoy, please pay people the respect of at least reading 10% of their questions next time.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey

      This does not sound good. Here are some information of reasons you have thought about and additional ideas about the cause of this annoying pain.

      1) Peripheral Vascular Disease: In case of bad circulation you usually get pain on walking. It is called claudication. Symptoms you should check are the bluish discolorization, cold feet, decreased pulses, diminished hair or nail growth. Google it to see pictures. If you don’t have any of these symptoms, this is a very unlikely cause of your pain.
      2) Spinal claudication/ neurogenic claudication: It is not due to lack of blood supply, but rather it is caused by nerve root compression and/or stenosis of the spinal canal, usually from a degenerative spine, most often at the “L4-L5″ or “L5-S1″ level. Then you should have experienced some lower back pain in the past. And the pain usually radiates down the leg from your back and is usually only in one foot.
      3) B12 deficiency: Causes megaloblastic anemia, abdominal symptoms and neuropathy. It is usually caused by the lack of intrinsic factor made in the gastric mucosa. Atrophic gastritis is a common cause of this in Iceland. But then you should experience other symptoms like tiredness, paleness. Your doctor can easily measure your B12 level in the blood by a simple blood test. It is not usefull to take oral B12 supplements because if you lack IF, the stomach is not able to absorb it and you will need a intramuscular shot of Vitamin B12. I think this is a very unlikely cause of your pain.
      4) Plantar fascitis: Is one of the most common causes of heel pain. It involves pain and inflammation of a thick band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, which runs across the bottom of your foot connecting your heel bone to your toes. The pain usually developes gradually. Affects just one foot, although it can occur in both feet simultaneously. Is worst with the first few steps after awakening, although it also can be triggered by long periods of standing or getting up from a seated position. Feels like a sharp pain in the heel of your foot. I see you have tried most of the treatment options for this, like NSAIDs, insoles, shock wave therapy. This is a likely cause, and can often be difficult to treat. But like you say, you rarely feel pain in the morning. So???
      5) Tarsal tunnel syndrome: compression of the tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel (posterior tibial neuralgia) It is similar to Carpal tunnel syndrome which is very common pain disorder in the hands. Symptoms are pain on standing and walking, usually relieved by rest. The pain is burning, tingling, or numb sensations in the lower legs. It is often followed by other neurological signs. It is a likely cause of your pain.
      6) Achilles tendon bursitis: Is inflammation of the fluid-filled sac (bursa) located either between the skin of the heel and the Achilles tendon (posterior Achilles tendon bursitis) or in front of the attachment of the Achilles tendon to the heel bone (anterior Achilles tendon bursitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis). Typical symptoms include swelling and warmth and a tender spot at the back of the heel. There usually developes a bump back of your heel.
      7) Tendonitis: inflammation of the tendons in your foot. Can also be tendonitis in the achilles tendon. NSAIDs, stretching of the muscles and exersicing should relief the pain.
      8) Medial plantar nerve entrapment: Compression of a nerve at the inner heel (the medial plantar nerve) that causes pain, numbness, or tingling. Symptoms include almost constant pain, whether walking or sitting. Just standing is often difficult. Burning, numbness, and tingling, which often occur when nerves are compressed.
      8) Arthritis: there are many different types of arthritis. You should ask your doctor to take a X-ray to see if there are any changes in the joint. You should also get a blood sample to check if you have elevated ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate)
      9)Peripheral polyneuropathy: a neurological condition. Symptoms are pins-and-needles sensation, numbness, burning pain, and loss of vibration sense and position sense (knowing where the arms and legs are) are prominent symptoms. Decreased patellar and achilles reflexes. Your doctor should do a complete neurological examination of your feet.

      I don’t have any more ideas right now. You can contact me again if you have any more questions. I recommend you go to your GP and ask for a X-ray of your feet, a blood sample to check ESR, CRP and B12, and that you get a neurological examination of the feet. You should also ask for pain relief.

  13. QUESTION:
    Joining the Marines – used to have foot problems but now I’m 100% fine?
    In high school I developed foot problems. They originally said it was due to plantar fasciitis. I was prescribed custom orthotics to give me arch support, and injections.

    I saw several doctors since treatment wasn’t working and eventually I was sent to an orthopedic surgeon. They did an ultrasound prior to doing anything drastic like surgery. They found that my plantar fascia was perfectly fine and I only lacked some fat padding under my heal bones. They gave me gel cushioning, and after a couple weeks of that I’m 100% healed.

    I don’t need any inserts or anything anymore. I’m usually barefoot now and nothing bothers me. I haven’t had any problems in several months now. I run every single morning.

    I’ve read that a history of plantar fasciitis or being prescribed custom orthotics is disqualifying at MEPS. However, I’m no longer injured and I don’t use orthotics of any kind anymore. I have zero pain.

    My concern is that my previous medical history will disqualify me from joining the Marines (hoping to go OCS after I finish my college degree). I was injured for three years seeking medical treatment. Do you think my situation is waiverable? I’m literally 100%. I can run several miles barefoot and no pain. I’ve done it recently. I was literally better in a couple of weeks once they correctly diagnosed me and treated me properly.

    I have no dependence on orthotics. I’ve never had surgery. No plates or bolts or anything either.

    I feel that it would be an awful shame for something like this to end my pursuit for a military career.

    • ANSWER:
      So long as you can prove it is not a handicap you should be able to get a waiver.

  14. QUESTION:
    My wife wants to quit her k job that is supporting the family. Asked once, not enough answers. Help?
    Back in 2002, my wife (21 at the time) and I (20) had our first child. After his birth it took my wife and I 2 years to find a “stable job” to support him under since we both struggled with low paying jobs that we kept getting fired/quit from. From 2003 to 2010 I worked a job that brought in the majority of the income (ending pay was k); meanwhile, my wife was going for her associate’s degree in accounting and working various jobs to help with bills. In April of 2010, I lost my job and fell hard into depression as a result. My wife then took on a job that has supported the family since then. My wife now makes k a year (almost as much as I did) and still gets to see the kids about as much as she would if she was home because they are in school now. But this doesn’t make my wife happy. My wife wants to quit her job and force me back into a career making the household income so she can stay home and get her bachelor’s and play with her girlfriends. Meanwhile, I don’t have ANY college education and since I was FIRED from my last employer, finding a job in Michigan (with 13% unemployment rate in the state and most of that in my area) will be extremely difficult. I have several disabilities that prevent me from working including: generalized anxiety disorder, attention deficient disorder, two fused discs in my back causing me back pain when lifting heavy items, either lactose intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome, anal fissure that gets aggravated due to the irritable bowl syndrome situation, constant anxiety attacks with muscle tension in my back, and lately my feet have been hurting which sounds a lot like Plantar fasciitis… If my health is so terrible, and if she’s already making k, can you explain to me why she would want to be home and push me out into the world to work that high stress and body damaging crap all over again? Emotionally and mentally I’m not a cripple, but physically and psychologically I am. Do you think my wife is being selfish/irrational? Or do you think that I’m being selfish for not doing my Christian duty as being the “man of the house” and “providing for my family” like a real “Man” would do? (Sorry for the attitude but you know all that is a stereotype right?)

    Help me work out a compromise here. I’m running out of ways to tell my wife that I’m not fit to work because to her she sees them as all “lies” even though doctors are the ones saying I have these conditions…

    Just so everyone knows: I do ALL the house chores. I mean ALL of them. The only thing I’ll try to skip out on doing is making dinner because I’m not a good cook. I even take care of the kids 90% of the time while my wife hides in the basement to pay bills, socialize with her girlfriends, and plays games. So don’t assume that all I do is lay around the house; you house wives know what it’s like to take care of a family of 4. Constantly cleaning messes, constantly doing laundry, constantly disinfecting rooms, constantly caring for animals, constantly vacuuming, and all the other things we at home’s do. It’s actually really hard work to keep a house up to “keeping up with the jones’s” standards!!!! So don’t give me this “you’re lazy” bull crap; I work probably harder than her at home! How hard is it to crunch numbers in front of a computer if you’ve been TRAINED to do that? I want to add too that I take care of ALL of my wife’s emotional needs that I can. I rub her back and pop her zits and scrape her skin and massage her body and go OUT of my way to make her life working comfortable/convenient.

    Answer me this: If you had to work but you came home and you were treated like a king/queen, would YOU stop working?

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    My wife wants to quit her k job that is supporting the family because she believes it’s a man’s job to work?
    Back in 2002, my wife (21 at the time) and I (20) had our first child. After his birth it took my wife and I 2 years to find a “stable job” to support him under since we both struggled with low paying jobs that we kept getting fired/quit from. From 2003 to 2010 I worked a job that brought in the majority of the income (ending pay was k); meanwhile, my wife was going for her associate’s degree in accounting and working various jobs to help with bills. In April of 2010, I lost my job and fell hard into depression as a result. My wife then took on a job that has supported the family since then. My wife now makes k a year (almost as much as I did) and still gets to see the kids about as much as she would if she was home because they are in school now. But this doesn’t make my wife happy. My wife wants to quit her job and force me back into a career making the household income so she can stay home and get her bachelor’s and play with her girlfriends. Meanwhile, I don’t have ANY college education and since I was FIRED from my last employer, finding a job in Michigan (with 13% unemployment rate in the state and most of that in my area) will be extremely difficult. I have several disabilities that prevent me from working including: generalized anxiety disorder, attention deficient disorder, two fused discs in my back causing me back pain when lifting heavy items, either lactose intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome, anal fissure that gets aggravated due to the irritable bowl syndrome situation, constant anxiety attacks with muscle tension in my back, and lately my feet have been hurting which sounds a lot like Plantar fasciitis… If my health is so terrible, and if she’s already making k, can you explain to me why she would want to be home and push me out into the world to work that high stress and body damaging crap all over again? Emotionally and mentally I’m not a cripple, but physically and psychologically I am. Do you think my wife is being selfish/irrational? Or do you think that I’m being selfish for not doing my Christian duty as being the “man of the house” and “providing for my family” like a real “Man” would do? (Sorry for the attitude but you know all that is a stereotype right?)

    Help me work out a compromise here. I’m running out of ways to tell my wife that I’m not fit to work because to her she sees them as all “lies” even though doctors are the ones saying I have these conditions…

    Just so everyone knows: I do ALL the house chores. I mean ALL of them. The only thing I’ll try to skip out on doing is making dinner because I’m not a good cook. I even take care of the kids 90% of the time while my wife hides in the basement to pay bills, socialize with her girlfriends, and plays games. So don’t assume that all I do is lay around the house; you house wives know what it’s like to take care of a family of 4. Constantly cleaning messes, constantly doing laundry, constantly disinfecting rooms, constantly caring for animals, constantly vacuuming, and all the other things we at home’s do. It’s actually really hard work to keep a house up to “keeping up with the jones’s” standards!!!! So don’t give me this “you’re lazy” bull crap; I work probably harder than her at home! How hard is it to crunch numbers in front of a computer if you’ve been TRAINED to do that? I want to add too that I take care of ALL of my wife’s emotional needs that I can. I rub her back and pop her zits and scrape her skin and massage her body and go OUT of my way to make her life working comfortable/convenient.

    Answer me this: If you had to work but you came home and you were treated like a king/queen, would YOU stop working?

    • ANSWER:
      If i had to work but came home and was treated like a queen i would not stop working. unless i would still be treated the same way unemployed.
      Put it to her like this. Agree to find a minimum wage job. But she has to keep her job. She would pay the bills while your money would go into an emergency fund or to the bank for later. then while keeping your sucky job (maybe at bk. i dont think you need your back or self respect for that job) you’ll keep looking for one. Eventually you WILL find one. But your wife seems extremely selfish in this situation!! once you guys are sure your financially stable and you have a GOOD job, she can quit her job, OR she can keep it and you guys can all live very comfortably and go on family vacations.
      I hope this is a good solution. I dont have a family of my own or anything so im just going on pure rational thought. I hope things work out for you, i really do.
      If that doesnt you can argue with her that ur the househusband she made you. but im not sure thats a good way to go..
      anyway good luck!!

  16. QUESTION:
    Need help with excruciating heel pain!?
    I have had pain in my left heel for quite a few months now. I don’t believe that it’s plantar fasciitis. Maybe it’s heel spurs or a stress fracture. I’m having a hard time walking. Has anyone ever been treated for something like this? Should I ice it? Is there a good way to wrap it?

    Now the obvious answer is going to be “go to the doctor.” However, I’m kind of stuck in the “invisible class,” that is, I am a temp, have no health insurance plan, barely make enough to make ends meet, but don’t qualify for any kind of public help. I make “too much money” for low-income and sliding fee scale clinics. I also somehow owe the IRS a large amount of money in taxes, so paying out of pocket, full-price, for a doctor visit (much less meds, physical therapy, or procedural treatment) is just not in the realm of possibility for me. I need some home remedies until I can land a permanent job (which will hopefully happen sometime this month). Sorry to whine, but I need HELP!

    Thanks a lot

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same pain on my right heel a couple of years ago.  I massage my heal with a portable massaging machine every day.  I also applied a cream called La Ubre.  You can find this cream at your local pharmacy for just under .00.  I saved a bundle on doctor bills and medicine. I have been pain free ever since. I feel great. Try it. You won’t regret it. I haven’t. Besides what do you have to loose, not money.

  17. QUESTION:
    plantar fasciitis?
    don’t quote me on the spelling-

    after being told I was fine and should stay active by 4 doctors when no fracture showed up the xrays-I found out that I have bi lateral plantar fasciitis.

    I am awaiting another appointment with another podiatrist who hopefully knows things otehr than fractures cause pain.

    Until then-I have been researching/treating on my own-it’s not going well as I can’t take NSAIDS-

    I ahve not found any info on bilateral (both feet at once)-spedifically the prevalance-

    has anyone experienced bilateral fasciitis?

    Informed comments please
    i should say that I gfound out by reading a medical advice column in the newspaper.

    I believe it said that it is common to have a spur with fasciitis-but not teh same thing-

    It is inflammation of teh connective tissue from the heel to fron t of teh foot-main symptomis heel pain on the bottom of the foot

    • ANSWER:
      yes..

      Reduce your activity. When heel spurs are very painful don’t apply any pressure on the foot. If you think pain is developing, take preventive steps to avoid this. Allow your foot to rest for some time and reduce your exercise schedule and find out the likely causes of the problem. Taking quick action will amplify the results of self-treatment, so that you can carry on with the regular activity while undergoing treatment.

      Keep ice on the painful area. An icepack can provide relief from the pain of the plantar fascia, and is more useful for the intial pain or reinitiated injury. Ice the part for 10-15 minutes, turning the icepack around. Wait for 30 minutes before reapplying. Moving your foot on an iced can or bottle is an effective method to reduce plantar fasciitis swelling.

      http://www.askaquery.com/question/Tips-to-Get-Rid-of-Heel-Spurs.html


Plantar Fasciitis Doctors Los Angeles

The diagnosis of heel pain is best done by looking at the location of the pain… “where does it hurt?”

Heel pain can occur in two major locations: the back of the heel and the bottom of the heel.

Pain at the back of the heel has three major causes.

Achilles tendonitis is the most common. It is usually the result of injury or overuse. An example is the weekend warrior who decides to go out and run 4 or 5 miles going up hills… or a person who goes on a long walk in flat shoes, shoes with little or no heel. In both cases, stress is placed on the Achilles tendon- the large thick cord located in the back of the heel.

This tendon- the largest in the body- connects the gastrocnemius (calf) muscle to the back of the heel.

The likelihood of Achilles tendonitis developing is increased if a person has flat feet. Older patients taking corticosteroid medications and people treated wtih quinolone antibiotics like ciprofloxacin (Cipro) also are at increased risk of Achilles tendonitis and even Achilles tendon rupture.

Haglunds syndrome presents with a bony bump located at the back of the heel. A bursa (small sack of fluid) located near the bump may contribute to the swelling. The Achilles tendon insertion near the bony swelling may become inflamed. Because of the location, this syndrome is often referred to as “pump bumps” and the cause often attributed to womens’ shoes.

Inflammation of the Achilles tendon at its insertion into the heel can be seen with certain types of arthritis, specifically the spondyloarthropathy group which consists of Reiter’s disease, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other signs of disease such as low back pain and stiffness, rash, and joint swelling may provide clues to diagnosis.

Pain in the bottom of the heel is usually due to plantar fasciitis.

Pain in the plantar fascia presents with sharp stabbing pain in the bottom of the heel. Plantar fasciitis is a common problem that is due to repetitive trauma to the soft tissue in the heel.

Typically a patient will feel fine so long as they are lying down or sitting. But if they get up to walk, the pain feels like an ice pick is being jammed into the bottom of the heel.

This pain gets better over several minutes but occurs again after inactivity followed by weight-bearing.

Causes of plantar fasciitis include:

• An abrupt increase in activity
• Worn footwear,
• Footwear with no arch support (eg., flip-flops)
• Obesity
• Recent rapid weight gain such as with pregnancy
• Overuse as in excessive running and over-training
• Systemic inflammatory arthritis (particularly ankylosing spondylitis and other spondyloarthropathies such as Reiter’s disease and psoriatic arthritis).

Treatment involves first establishing the diagnosis. Most of the time, the diagnosis can be suspected by the history and physical examination.

Imaging tests such as diagnostic ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can confirm the diagnosis, if necessary. X-rays may reveal the presence of a heel spur. A heel spur, by itself, is not the cause of pain in the bottom of the heel and heel pain should not be attributed to “a heel spur”.

Once the diagnosis has been made, treatment options include:

• Identifying likely causative factors such as excessive weight, inappropriate footwear, and errors in training.

• Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) sometimes provide symptomatic relief.

• Therapeutic taping gives short-term symptom relief.

• Exercises to stretch the heel cord and plantar fascia.

• Orthotic devices can help in the short-term reduction of pain. These can be off-the-shelf or custom made. For people with Achilles tendonitis, having the patient wear a lift in the shoe to elevate the heel will help reduce symptoms.

• Glucocorticoid (steroid) injection may also work for plantar fasciitis and should be used if the patient has not responded to conservative measures. The use of diagnostic ultrasound to guide the injection is recommended.

Caution should be observed with the Achilles tendon as far as steroid injection. The tendon can be weakened if steroids are directly injected. This then can lead to Achilles rupture.

The bursitis that occasionally accompanies Achilles tendonitis (retrocalcaneal bursitis) will respond to steroid injection.

If a patient is taking a quinolone antibiotic (such as ciprofloxacin), it should be discontinued and the patient should be monitored for tendonitis and tendon rupture.

Night time braces are sometimes used for plantar fasciitis.

Often the best treatment for heel pain, whether it is located in the back or on the bottom, is rest.

A surgical solution should be considered for those patients with intractable pain which remains despite conservative treatment.


Plantar Fasciitis Doctor New York

Plantar fasciitis slippers offer the comfort and arch support that heel spur sufferers need. Many people who suffer from this painful and common condition lack footwear that enables them to enjoy loose, freedom-from-constriction footwear while at home. A good design in slippers that are intended for this use allow for unrestricted lounging without compromising foot health.

The healing process for heel spurs can be all the more excruciating when the right footwear accommodations are not made. Slippers offer a comfortable way to putter about the house. They rarely, however, offer the features that are necessary for the healing process associated with heel spurs. Plantar fasciitis slippers are specially designed house shoes that allow you to relax comfortably, while providing the support features required for adequate resolution.

There are numerous selections of plantar fasciitis slippers to choose from. Some are simply structured and designed to hold the most desirable shape for this issue. Others offer removable orthotic inserts which enable the shoes to be fully functional for both aiding with heel spurs and soothing the foot under normal, ideal conditions. Some designs boast slip and skid resistant exterior materials that not only promote comfort, but safety as well. This is often necessary when this painful condition of the foot prevents the wearer from getting ideal traction.

Plantar Fasciitis Doctor Kind

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Have had no luck with Podiatrist for plantar fasciitis. What other kind of doctor should I see?

    • ANSWER:
      You may need to try another podiatrist for another opinion (depending on what happens with the other specialists I’m going to recommend), but another specialty you can try besides podiatry is that of an orthopedic surgeon or even a chiropractor to see what they might be able to do to help your plantar fasciitis.

  2. QUESTION:
    Which kind of doctor is best for the foot?
    I have a very sore heel and arch, diagnosed as plantar fasciitis. Should I go to an orthopedic surgeon, who has told me he would be happy to do x-rays or go back to the podiatrist, who has so far not done any x-rays?

    • ANSWER:
      I’m a podiatrist and 1/3 of my patients are plantar fasciitis/heel pain. It is a curable problem and isn’t permanent. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation and possible tearing of a ligament on bottom of the foot caused by your foot type, way you walk or trauma. Treament includes icing, stretching, NSAIDS, Steroid injections, night splint, physical therapy, well padded tennis shoe, custom orthotics, surgery. A custom orthotic has been proven to cure fasciitis 80% of the time if it’s made from a plaster cast because it treats the cause of the problem, all else treats the symptoms. Stretching is the #1 treatment for this besides orthotics. Try a dr. scholl’s tri-comfort insert for the best drug store orthotic if your orthotic isn’t working. Go back to a Podiatrist, or get a second podiatrist if you don’t like the first one.

  3. QUESTION:
    What kind of sandals can I wear? I have Plantar Fasciitis (Heel pain)?
    Hello I have Plantar Fasciitis (Heel pain caused by inflammation of connective tissue on the bottom part of my foot). My doctor has advised wearing insoles that support the arches of my feet as in my case the problem is caused by dropped arches and my left foot rolling inwards. My feet need support but insoles tend to slip out of sandals!

    Are there any sandals on sale in the UK that will provide the necessary support and shaping without the need for an insole? Or does anyone have any other ideas? It’s summer and my feet get really hot in shoes! Oh and preferably they should come in black or another dark colour.

    • ANSWER:
      My dad wore birkenstocks when his PF was bothering him and he still does today. They aren’t really my style of shoe though.

      For me it was better to use Crocs. I actually wear their Rx Relief shoes to work every day (they are designed to provide comfort for PF). I have them in brown, but they come in all colors (including black). I usually wear them without socks and the holes give my feet enough air flow. I wear them with jeans.

      When I purchased them I also got crocs flip flops, mary janes, and some other type that are comfy, too (they were all on sale). I got silver flip flops, but I am sure they have them in black, too. My mary janes are my weekend shoes for the most part so I typically wear them with shorts.

      Crocs are “squishy” so they feel nice to walk on.

      Good luck! PF is such a pain!

  4. QUESTION:
    (Doctors only)Is plantar fasciitis linked to fybromyalsia?
    I have been in a great amount of unexplained pain and fatigue since I can remember. Every doctor I go to gives a blood test, and says there is nothing wrong. Last month,I had been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis as a stress injury, but all my other pains and aches still hinder withought any attention from the doctors. I am convinced that I have Fibromyalsia because all the symptoms associated with it I have expirianced. I have had MRIs, X-rays, and blood tests of every kind. Everyone but me has given up so PLEASE help me out

    • ANSWER:
      These two problems are not related although both can be quite painful. Fibromyalgia can not be diagnosed with blood tests or with xrays, MRI, and CT Scans. You can go see a rheumatologist since these are the specialist that typically diagnose this disorder. There are specific criteria that you will need to meet, but it is basically a diagnosis by ruling out all other possible causes for the pain such as arthritis. Most insurances do not require a referral to see a specialist any more, so just get all of you medical records and make an appointment. If you have insurance that does require a referral, then you need to ask you PCP. While this doctor can make the diagnosis, they typically do not manage the pain, but will refer you to a pain management doctor. These doctors will be able to create a pain management plan that is appropriate for your condition. Finding a doctor that will listen to you can be very hard sometimes, especially with something like this, since there are many doctors that do not believe this is actually a condition. They think that the pain is all in the patient’s head. You just need to keep searching until you find a doctor that believes you and that also believes that Fibromyalgia is a disease. Good Luck

  5. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have Plantar Fasciitis and Tendonitis of the Achilles Tendon at the same time?
    i was recently told that i have Plantar Fascitis and that’s why my Achilles Tendon has been hurting for a very long time now but is it possible to have both at the same time?? At first i was told that i had Tendonitis of my Achilles Tendon but now the Doctor’s telling me it’s Plantar Fascitis. I had a Bone Scan done (to rule out stress fractures in my heels) of both my feet as well as weight bearing xrays. My heel hurts when ig et up in the morning but after walking around through out the day it hurts just as much as it did in the morning. Also, whenever i run a lot my Achilles tendon hurts very badly and swells….i can also feel it move, kind of like a rubber band. I am in the military….i don’t run everyday by choice.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      “Technically” it is possible to suffer from both Achilles tendinitis and Plantar Fasciitis at the same time.
      According to your description however it does sound like you have both because when you have only Plantar Fasciitis then the pain in the morning should go away after a few steps (usually).
      In your case your heel hurts when you are active as well.

      If you can answer these questions I might help some more:

      1) Where exactly does it hurt in your heel?
      2) Do you see any redness or swelling?
      3) Is there a bump or a lump on the back of your heel?
      4) Do you have high or low arches?
      5) What kind of shoes you usually wear?
      6) Does it hurt to the touch, if you press on it?

      I suggest that you stop any physical activity – especially running if possible and wear good shoes with arch supports.
      You should also ice your heel at least 4 times a day and do stretching exercises before getting out of bed.

      I hope you feel better soon.
      Best of luck!

      If you prefer you can write to me – itaiw@yahoo.com

  6. QUESTION:
    Always in pain.. what could it be?
    Hey! Just trying to get some advice. I’m 22 and I have had back issues for a while. My back hurts practically every day. My SI joint slips out of place a lot, because of uneven leg lengths, causing my right hip &under butt to hurt. I have neck pain a lot. For the past 2 years I’ve had problems with my right shoulder (went to orthopedic surgeon- “nothings wrong”) It has less range of motion and is constantly in pain. I have tendonitis in my right wrist, stress fractured a bone in my right foot, I think I have plantar fasciitis. Also, I had a joint in my right knee out of place a little over a month ago, had the chiro fix it, then I fell in a inline skating race a month ago which caused it to come out of place again, and since then it has came out again twice, and I am still in pain even a month later which seems odd. Anyone heard of anything having to do with pain all on the right side?? My mom thinks I might have fibromyalgia because I’m always in pain- asked a doctor but she kind of ignored it. Tested negative for RA and Lupus… any ideas?

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    Always in pain (mainly) right side of body. Fibro? RA? Something else?
    Hey! Just trying to get some advice. I’m 22 and I have had back issues for a while. My back hurts practically every day. My SI joint slips out of place a lot, because of uneven leg lengths, causing my right hip/under butt to hurt. I have neck pain a lot. For the past 2 years I’ve had problems with my right shoulder (went to orthopedic surgeon- “nothings wrong”) It has less range of motion and is constantly in pain. I have tendonitis in my right wrist, stress fractured a bone in my right foot, I think I have plantar fasciitis … Anyone heard of anything having to do with pain all on the right side?? My mom thinks I might have fibromyalgia because I’m always in pain- asked a doctor but she kind of ignored it. Tested negative for RA and Lupus… any ideas??
    Also, I had a joint in my right knee out of place a little over a month ago, had the chiro fix it, then I fell in a inline skating race a month ago which caused it to come out of place again, and since then it has came out again twice, and I am still in pain even a month later which seems odd.
    @JMITW that was rude. No I didn’t answer my own question. It isn’t all skeletal. My shoulder isn’t for sure, my wrist isn’t for sure…and i am looking for something because nothing has helped so far. If you are going to be rude and not help people, then don’t give your input.

    @JMITW thanks. I don’t have a thyroid problem, I had that checked too.

    @2Blessed thanks!

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    I think I was misdiagnosed…?
    I injured my foot during a volleyball game a month ago, by rolling my foot. I iced it on and off, but it still hurts whenever I put weight on the ball of my foot, like when I sprint, jump, and sometimes walk (I usually try to put weight on my heel, but sometimes I end up putting some on the ball). It hurts at the top (NOT the bottom) of my foot, about two inches off of my ankle. I assumed that I had sprained my foot or something, and went to get it checked out by the doctor today. However, the doctor said some stuff about how she thought I had plantar fasciitis. As I got home and read the information she printed out for me, I just realized that this was a completely stupid diagnosis on her part. It says that plantar faciitis is heel pain, due to either non supportive shoes, flat feet, high arched feet, or sudden increase in activity level. My foot has been hurting because of an actual injury- I have normal arches, I wear supportive shoes made for volleyball, and I’ve been playing at the same intensity level for quite awhile.

    I’m slightly ticked by her diagnosis and treatment (just to get an arch support). Is there anything better I could do? I want to give as much rest and healing time to my foot as possible so I can get back on to the volleyball courts as soon as it heals. Oh, and I can’t really go to another doctor at the moment, so that’s kind of out of the question..
    There was no swelling when I went to the doctors today, and there never was at the time of or after the injury happened- which I thought was a bit odd, since it’s continuously been hurting for this past month. I clearly told the doctor that though, and I clearly stated where it hurt and what exactly happened to my foot… I have no idea where she got the plantar plantar fasciitis from.

    • ANSWER:
      Your doc was probably misled by lack of swelling or bruising. Was there any?

      Sounds like a classic sprain, and I looked for you to say you actually rolled it. That does some muscle damage, and possible tendon damage, and sometimes pulls a ligament, which gets bad.

      Do circling exercises, draw circles with the foot, and stay on it with care, if it does not swell. Sometimes, this can last for years and be chronic anyway, and the advice I give will not be the cause. I hope for healing with mobility.

  9. QUESTION:
    Need help with excruciating heel pain!?
    I have had pain in my left heel for quite a few months now. I don’t believe that it’s plantar fasciitis. Maybe it’s heel spurs or a stress fracture. I’m having a hard time walking. Has anyone ever been treated for something like this? Should I ice it? Is there a good way to wrap it?

    Now the obvious answer is going to be “go to the doctor.” However, I’m kind of stuck in the “invisible class,” that is, I am a temp, have no health insurance plan, barely make enough to make ends meet, but don’t qualify for any kind of public help. I make “too much money” for low-income and sliding fee scale clinics. I also somehow owe the IRS a large amount of money in taxes, so paying out of pocket, full-price, for a doctor visit (much less meds, physical therapy, or procedural treatment) is just not in the realm of possibility for me. I need some home remedies until I can land a permanent job (which will hopefully happen sometime this month). Sorry to whine, but I need HELP!

    Thanks a lot

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same pain on my right heel a couple of years ago.  I massage my heal with a portable massaging machine every day.  I also applied a cream called La Ubre.  You can find this cream at your local pharmacy for just under .00.  I saved a bundle on doctor bills and medicine. I have been pain free ever since. I feel great. Try it. You won’t regret it. I haven’t. Besides what do you have to loose, not money.

  10. QUESTION:
    What Do You Think Is Wrong With My Foot?
    Hey im Erica!

    Ive had chronic foot and ankle problems for a while now so im kind of used to it but since school is tomorrow and all im looking for an answer =] Im 15 and my dad is a doctor and he said he thinks its plantar fasciitis but im not sure. He’s said that before but the pain was different then. Its on the tendon (or something like that) near the bottom of my foot, i was just sitting on the couch watching tv and all the sudden my foot got really swollen and i couldnt bring my toes up without it hurting really badly.

    any ideas?
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      dad may be right

  11. QUESTION:
    Is anyone else going through a nightmare with full blown Fibromyalgia?
    I am a 52 year old woman and I was diagnosed in 1995 with Fibromyalgia (FMS), but the symptoms started about 2 years before that but by 1996 it had gotten worse and each year that passes I get even more worse.
    About 4 years ago I was diagnosed by my pain doctor and neurologist with full-blown Fibromyalgia (FMS), besides the Fibromyalgia, I have been diagnosed with arthritis in both legs, Bursitis, Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease, (I have no disks left in my neck at all), Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease, Bilateral Plantar Fasciitis, Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), Depression, Migraines, Cephalgia, Plantar Fasciitis, Cervical Spondylosis, Anterior Osteophytes, Dextroscoliosis, Bilateral Knee Osteoarthritis, high blood pressure and I’m a type 2 Diabetic.
    With the Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and the FMS I stay in constant pain all over, its hard to even walk these days, I hurt from my head to my feet constantly, it never lets up. The migraine headaches I get now every other week and it lasts about 5 days, that has been going on for some time now, I have a spare bedroom that Todd (my fiance) has made dark for me and I have to stay in there until the migraine passes because it is so painful and the light and noise intensify’s that pain, the first couple of days of having a migraine I’m very sick to my stomach from the pain.
    My doctors say its because of the FMS and that also since I have Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease my vertebras are constantly grinding against each other and that is what is causing so many migraines.
    The neurologist had told me that if it started interfering with the nerves in my body he would have to operate, which is already happening because my legs have been give out from under me and my hands will go numb half way up to my elbows, for the past year now my legs have been getting ice cold, I went to my doctors and they said that it was most likely from the vertebras pressing against the nerves, that is a very expensive operation and I don’t have any way to pay for it. I’ve applied for medicaid but they deny me. I’ve had an MRI done and it shows I also have Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease with disks worn away and protruding disks, Dr. Ernie Hodges (my pain doctor who I’ve been going to since 1996 once a month) says that that is the reason why my legs feel weak and give out from under me and get cold because the vertebras are pressing against the nerves. I walk with a cane now because of my legs buckling all the time and the pain being so intense in my back, legs, hips, neck and down the middle of my back, even having to use a cane kills my shoulder, my doctor told me that I should be using a walker but I cant seem to bring myself to do that just yet especially with me being only 52, it is also hard for me to even get up and down, I have to have someone to help me get back up. Since spring I’ve gotten to the point that I cant hardly get out of bed anymore, the only time I only get out of bed now is when I absolutely have to, I have to constantly rotate laying-sitting and standing, too long of each one causes the pain in my body to intensify.
    I don’t have any kind of life outside of my home anymore. I can’t lift anything because of the pain of the FMS in my shoulders. I cant bend my back because of the pain in my back and hips, and if I do happen to bend over I need help to straighten back up, that I have to have help getting up or help just doing every day things that most people take for advantage is mortifying to me but I have no choice, and the pain is at times most unbearable. Since I couldn’t bend over anymore to pick things up I would squat, but I can’t do that now because of the pain in my knees and legs being so bad, it hurts to turn my head because of the Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease in my neck, it hurts to raise my arms up, my feet swell all the time and hurt and my fingers cramp up and go numb half way up to my elbows, now they even go numb not doing anything, I cant hold anything but for just a few minutes, even the bottom of my feet hurt to walk on them.
    I stay depressed and cry all the time because of all the pain that has taken over my entire body and because the life I once knew is gone, I have no life now, I stay shut up in my home 24-7 except to go to my doctors and now to top it all off I can’t find anyone to help me to get my case reopened. I can’t drive anymore or do any of the things I use to do, it just hurts too bad trying to sit up straight to drive and it kills my shoulders having to turn the steering wheel and the pain is almost unbearable in my hip and legs from having to smash the brakes and the gas petal, so I had to stop. Since I don’t go anywhere except to my doctors I guess you can say I am basically homebound. Todd takes me to my doctor visits, when I go to my doctors and when I get home I’m in terrible pain from the ride there and it usually takes me a whole week to get over that trip, but this doctor has b

    • ANSWER:
      I am 37 and have been dealing with the fibro nightmare for 4 years as far as the official diagnosis. Right now though my fibro has been quiet. It has been quiet now for 17 weeks.

      If you would like to find out more about what happened to make it be that way please feel free to e-mail me off site any time. Also, please feel free to e-mail me off site any time if you would like to talk some more about this as far as the struggles with fibromyalgia.

  12. QUESTION:
    Getting bad pain in foot, help?
    What I’m wondering is, I have a pain on the right foot on the right side just below the baby toe. It’s tender to touch and hurts a lot to arch my foot kind of like standing on your tipy toes. The pain is mostly from below the baby toe to about half way up the side of the foot. The pain had stopped for a while and I thought it had gone away but I wore a pair of heels last night and my foot by the end of the night was hurting so much that it was probably a 9/10 almost as if I had broken something. Now this morning it’s subsided but it’s still there tender to touch but not as bad to arch the foot. I’m not sure if I should put ice on it or if this is something that is common with Plantar Fasciitis which I had last year, could it be related? I could go see my doctor and ask him to send me to a specialist but that could take forever. I would like to know if there’s anything I could possible do now or if anyone else has ever heard of this before.
    I don’t normally wear high heels usually a loafer with a 1 inch heel. But this night it was a 4 inch heel and it felt like there was pressure on the sides of the foot in the boot but it was comfortable at first but throughtout the night it got worse if I walked on it, it didn’t seem to hurt as much but the moment I sat down it was unbearable.
    Sorry I mean if I walked on it, it seemed better but when I sat down it hurt the most.

    • ANSWER:

  13. QUESTION:
    Can anyone help me with this?
    I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis when i went to the UK. I have had it for six months. Taking pain killers every day for it and nothing has helped at all. i went to a podriatist while i was there and she gave me an insole for my shoes, and told me to do certain exercises. I am doing all this, but sometimes it really aches. Can anyone that has had this tell me what kind of medication did they use and was it any good? I was prescibed Tramadol and Ibuprofen, and it has not helped me. I am in terrible pain here and no doctor has any advice to give me here. And also i am sure that i am going to live for the rest of my life with this, and its making my life unbearable. Any kind advice would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    Bibigirl how do you cope with 2 of them never mind one. I am going crazy here. Every time i have to stand up on my feet again after sitting down its excruciating. I loved walking and now i cant even do that. I am sorry you have the both.

    • ANSWER:
      come back to the uk and your problem will be solved

  14. QUESTION:
    What are the first symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    Over the course of the past month, I’ve noticed that I’ve been having problems with my hands, more specifically my knuckles and joints in my fingers. On occasion my wrists and elbows will bother me. Its’ both hands and they are mainly stiff and will just ache. Its worse at night and in the morning. Occasionally I wake up due to my hands aching so bad, or having just fallen asleep. I often have swollen fingers, where I can’t even take my ring off. I’m already hypothyroid, and I mostly take after my aunt health wise, who suffered from RA. I worry I may be following in her footsteps as far as this also. Some days my hands are so achy that I cannot do simple things like write or even open a bottle of pop. It came on kind of suddenly though, and is gradually getting worse. I also have weird lumps on my arms but IDK what they are. Does this sound like anyone who has RA? I have sore feet and ankles but I think that could be from plantar fasciitis (haven’t been diagnosed but that’s what I think it is…my last job was 8hrs on my feet and I’m overweight). I once had a doctor do allergy testing, he also ran a few tests on my immune system commenting that my immune system was slightly off but said he wasn’t concerned at that time and would re-test in a few years (that was at the end of 2005). I know one test he ran was for Lupus, but I’ve never been tested again.
    I also suffer from horrible chronic migraines.
    Any advice??? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Presence or absence or rheumatoid factor is not diagnostic of any disease; this test is very nonspecific. 70% of patients with a disease called rheumatoid arthritis are positive for this test but 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are negative for this test. The diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detailed examination of the patient by an expert rheumatologist. Therefore you must immediately find out a rheumatologist nearest to you and get an appointment with him/her for proper diagnosis and treatment of your ailment.

  15. QUESTION:
    Please..Help.. What is wrong with my feet?
    I’m tired of trying.. I’m tired of seeing different kinds of doctors. I just want somebody with the same symptoms to tell me what they did or get in touch me with me. I feel so alone.

    My symptoms are..Well:

    I can run 10 miles, I can weightlift (Not sure how much longer), I used to be able to walk around but now.. I can’t. It started with me not being able to stand for prolonged periods of time in the army. I got severe foot pain, felt like a burning sensation or a loss of blood. Now.. It has come to point where I can’t go out for a smoke break at work without feeling pain. I used to run a marathon without feeling much pain until afterwards, but now I’m not sure. Definitely, the more circulation, the better.. That, I have figured.

    My feet even hurts when clutching in my car now.. It’s become a serious handicap. I used to be a soldier and a bodybuilder. I’m a bodybuilder, but no longer a soldier.. And I’m getting pain when working out so.. No idea how long I can stay a bodybuilder.

    I don’t want to end up as a wreck. I’ve prayed, I’ve gone to specialists.. I’ve tried everything. Nobody listens and nobody understands. The bottom of my feet HURT BADLY when I stand and has developed to the point where I can’t do SHIT.

    If ANYONE here has symptoms like mine or has anything USEFUL to say (I’ve read PLANTAR FASCIITIS MILLIONS OF TIMES DON’T EVEN MENTION IT, IT’S NOT THAT, DO YOUR RESEARCH). PLEASE.. HELP!
    People here (at least the first 2 answers) are fu*king retarded. OF COURSE I’VE SEEN A PODIATRIST (It’s one of those many kinds of doctors I complain about in the start of this) AND I’VE SEEN ABOUT 20 DOCTORS SO I AM NOT SELF DIAGNOSING YOU FU*KING TWAT. I STATED IN THE START OF THIS THAT I’M TIRED OF DOCTORS NOT KNOWING WHAT THE FU*K IS WRONG WITH ME SO WHAT THE HELL DO YOU THINK!

    • ANSWER:
      i tried to answer you last time about your poor feet last time but the topic closed.i had the same problem.i ended up finding out i was diabetic.diabetic foot pain is like no other.there is help though,on my way out the door to work! more later email me at problemrobin@yahoo.com

      i know how much you suffer son,you NOT ever alone -keep praying to and God bless you till later,we will find you the help you need if this is what it is,okay?soak them for now -epsom salt and tea tree oil is very soothing to mine.

  16. QUESTION:
    Joining the Marines – used to have foot problems but now I’m 100% fine?
    In high school I developed foot problems. They originally said it was due to plantar fasciitis. I was prescribed custom orthotics to give me arch support, and injections.

    I saw several doctors since treatment wasn’t working and eventually I was sent to an orthopedic surgeon. They did an ultrasound prior to doing anything drastic like surgery. They found that my plantar fascia was perfectly fine and I only lacked some fat padding under my heal bones. They gave me gel cushioning, and after a couple weeks of that I’m 100% healed.

    I don’t need any inserts or anything anymore. I’m usually barefoot now and nothing bothers me. I haven’t had any problems in several months now. I run every single morning.

    I’ve read that a history of plantar fasciitis or being prescribed custom orthotics is disqualifying at MEPS. However, I’m no longer injured and I don’t use orthotics of any kind anymore. I have zero pain.

    My concern is that my previous medical history will disqualify me from joining the Marines (hoping to go OCS after I finish my college degree). I was injured for three years seeking medical treatment. Do you think my situation is waiverable? I’m literally 100%. I can run several miles barefoot and no pain. I’ve done it recently. I was literally better in a couple of weeks once they correctly diagnosed me and treated me properly.

    I have no dependence on orthotics. I’ve never had surgery. No plates or bolts or anything either.

    I feel that it would be an awful shame for something like this to end my pursuit for a military career.

    • ANSWER:
      So long as you can prove it is not a handicap you should be able to get a waiver.

  17. QUESTION:
    Is anyone else going through a nightmare with full blown Fibromyalgia?
    I am a 52 year old woman and I was diagnosed in 1995 with Fibromyalgia (FMS), but the symptoms started about 2 years before that but by 1996 it had gotten worse and each year that passes I get even more worse.
    About 4 years ago I was diagnosed by my pain doctor and neurologist with full-blown Fibromyalgia (FMS), besides the Fibromyalgia, I have been diagnosed with arthritis in both legs, Bursitis, Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease, (I have no disks left in my neck at all), Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease, Bilateral Plantar Fasciitis, Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS), Depression, Migraines, Cephalgia, Plantar Fasciitis, Cervical Spondylosis, Anterior Osteophytes, Dextroscoliosis, Bilateral Knee Osteoarthritis, high blood pressure and I’m a type 2 Diabetic.
    With the Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and the FMS I stay in constant pain all over, its hard to even walk these days, I hurt from my head to my feet constantly, it never lets up. The migraine headaches I get now every other week and it lasts about 5 days, that has been going on for some time now, I have a spare bedroom that Todd (my fiance) has made dark for me and I have to stay in there until the migraine passes because it is so painful and the light and noise intensify’s that pain, the first couple of days of having a migraine I’m very sick to my stomach from the pain.
    My doctors say its because of the FMS and that also since I have Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease my vertebras are constantly grinding against each other and that is what is causing so many migraines.
    The neurologist had told me that if it started interfering with the nerves in my body he would have to operate, which is already happening because my legs have been give out from under me and my hands will go numb half way up to my elbows, for the past year now my legs have been getting ice cold, I went to my doctors and they said that it was most likely from the vertebras pressing against the nerves, that is a very expensive operation and I don’t have any way to pay for it. I’ve applied for medicaid but they deny me. I’ve had an MRI done and it shows I also have Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease with disks worn away and protruding disks, Dr. Ernie Hodges (my pain doctor who I’ve been going to since 1996 once a month) says that that is the reason why my legs feel weak and give out from under me and get cold because the vertebras are pressing against the nerves. I walk with a cane now because of my legs buckling all the time and the pain being so intense in my back, legs, hips, neck and down the middle of my back, even having to use a cane kills my shoulder, my doctor told me that I should be using a walker but I cant seem to bring myself to do that just yet especially with me being only 52, it is also hard for me to even get up and down, I have to have someone to help me get back up. Since spring I’ve gotten to the point that I cant hardly get out of bed anymore, the only time I only get out of bed now is when I absolutely have to, I have to constantly rotate laying-sitting and standing, too long of each one causes the pain in my body to intensify.
    I don’t have any kind of life outside of my home anymore. I can’t lift anything because of the pain of the FMS in my shoulders. I cant bend my back because of the pain in my back and hips, and if I do happen to bend over I need help to straighten back up, that I have to have help getting up or help just doing every day things that most people take for advantage is mortifying to me but I have no choice, and the pain is at times most unbearable. Since I couldn’t bend over anymore to pick things up I would squat, but I can’t do that now because of the pain in my knees and legs being so bad, it hurts to turn my head because of the Degenerative Cervical Disk Disease in my neck, it hurts to raise my arms up, my feet swell all the time and hurt and my fingers cramp up and go numb half way up to my elbows, now they even go numb not doing anything, I cant hold anything but for just a few minutes, even the bottom of my feet hurt to walk on them.
    I stay depressed and cry all the time because of all the pain that has taken over my entire body and because the life I once knew is gone, I have no life now, I stay shut up in my home 24-7 except to go to my doctors and now to top it all off I can’t find anyone to help me to get my case reopened. I can’t drive anymore or do any of the things I use to do, it just hurts too bad trying to sit up straight to drive and it kills my shoulders having to turn the steering wheel and the pain is almost unbearable in my hip and legs from having to smash the brakes and the gas petal, so I had to stop. Since I don’t go anywhere except to my doctors I guess you can say I am basically homebound. Todd takes me to my doctor visits, when I go to my doctors and when I get home I’m in terrible pain from the ride there and it usually takes me a whole week to get over that trip, but this doctor has b
    I couldnt finish all that I wanted to say, but you can go to my Myspace blog and read all that I am going through. Maybe there might be some suggestions or info we could share. Here is the link:

    http://www.myspace.com/angelsbutterflykisses

    • ANSWER:
      I am only 20 yrs old, and I know some of what you are going through. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia when I was 16. I have had arthritis since I was 18 months old! Also, my disks are degenerative and I have had MRI’s for my back, knees, and brain because of the excruciating migraines I’ve been having since I was 13 . So, as you can see, I know a little about pain. The only thing that going to specialists has done for me is just put me on more medicines that don’t work. I have to just push through. I am a full time college student and I work. I have no choice, I support myself. So, to answer your question, yes, someone else is where you are. I feel your pain. Also, I lived with my grandmother, great grandfather, and great great aunt all at the same time for 5 years. I know what it’s like to live with diabetes and other issues. Try to think about the good things, like how you have someone who helps you and takes care of you. I am studying psychology in college, and let me tell you, it is AMAZING what the effects of positive thinking can do on your body!! Thinking positive happy thoughts can make or break you. Seriously. One last thing, I see you have been seeing the same doctor for many years. With my experience, after switching doctors 3 times, I found one that really listened and was more up to date with newer treatments. That might be something to think about if you aren’t COMPLETELY satisfied with your current doctor.

      Hoping you the best!


Plantar Fasciitis Doctor Kaiser

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Pain in outer part of ankle. Please help.?
    Okay so I went to Kaiser just last week, and the doctor there told me that it was plantar fasciitis because at first, there was pain in the soles of my foot. Now there’s pain near the outer part of my ankle which I think is the peroneal tendon.

    So a little background information.
    I went camping and suddenly when I started walking there was a shooting pain in the sole of my feet. Now the day before, I drove at least an hour barefoot with my foot reaching for the gas. This probably explained the pain in the sole of my foot. Now to counteract this, I started putting all my weight on the right side/heel of my foot. After maybe four weeks the pain in the sole was gone, but now the outer part of my ankle is starting to hurt. It’s been almost six weeks since I’ve been back from camping. It’s been a little over three weeks since the outer ankle pain has started.

    Is the outer ankle pain a result of me putting the weight on it for a long time?
    What can I do to solve this?

    • ANSWER:


Plantar Fasciitis Doctor Ny

You step out of bed and your feet scream in pain! You waddle (or maybe even crawl) across the room until the pain starts to subside. Your are active, you try to keep walking even through the pain, but the pain just gets worse. After several minutes, the pain starts to improve only to return again if you sitdown, laydown or even by the end of the day no matter what. Does this sound familiar? For many people this is a dialy occurance and is usually diagnosed as “Plantar Fasciitis”.

Many people ask if this will resolve without treatment and often try to resolve it with some simple treatments at home like ice, stretching, arch supports or even changing shoes (goodbye flip flops). When the pain doesn’t improve (sometimes it does), they start to look for other options to overcome this limiting problem. There are many treatment options.

Common treatment options include orthotics, night splints, cortisone shots, casting, boots or even limiting activities. As an runner and a sports physician, I don’t consider it a good option to stop people from exercising, therefore I am constantly looking for options to resolve pain while continuing activities. Let me discuss some revolutionary treatment options for this painful condition:

1. Cold Laser –> This treatment option is painless and utilizes a type of Ultraviolet light (or low level photon energy) to penetrate in areas of pain to stimulate increased cellular metabolism in the areas of maximal pain. It will therefore produce increased cell migration to area and increased circulation to ultimately reduce swelling, reduce pain and produce healing of a painful plantar fascia.

The advantage of this treatment includes complete absence of pain during treatment and FDA approved safety. The biggest disadvantage is the need for multiple treatments (8-12) with 2-3 treatments required per week to get best results. It has been shown, however, to be quite beneficial.

2. APC (Autologus Platelet Concentrate) or Platelet Rich Plasma injection –> Another relatively new treatment that concentrates the cells most beneficial in healing as taken from the patient and reintroduce these cells percutaneously into the inflammed plantar fascia. The idea is to stimulate healing through injection (the simple act of inserting a needle can stimulate healing) and further stimulate healing through use of healing cells injected into the desired site.

Advantages include improvement and resolution of symptoms often after a single injection, often much more effective than cortisone injections. The big disadvantage includes pain with drawing of the blood and injection. Care must be utilized to minimize infection.

3. Topaz Radiocoblation –> The newest treatment, a minimally invasive surgery called the mini-plantar fasciotomy, consists of the percutaneous insertion of a radiofrequency probe into the plantar fascia. The probe is locally inserted at varying depths through the percutaneous grid to treat the most painful areas of the heel (and plantar fascia). The insertion produces three results: 1) Mini tears in the plantar fascia to allow lengthening and reduce the retrograde pull from normal walking. 2) Stimulate neoangiogenesis (new blood vessel formation) to reduce swelling and allow migration of necessary cells and mediators for healing the plantar fascia. 3) Growth factor migration to the area to stimulate collagen fiber regrowth and complete healing of the inflammed plantar fascia.

Advantages of this treatment include the usual resolution of pain longterm from solving the problem, not just treating the symptoms. The surgery is usually quick (often less than 20 minutes) and allows reeturn to regular shoegear within days of the treatment. One disadvantage of this procedure is the possible fact that the surgery may require 2-4 weeks for complete recovery.

Now with these state-of-the-art treatments, we often recommend combinations to produce the highest results. Most recently, we have combined the Topaz Radiocoblation with Platlet Rich Plasma (PRP) to utilize the advantages of each and produce the highest results. So as you hobble to the bathroom at night or in the early morning, consider some new treatments that may get you back to normal quickly.

Copyright (c) 2009 Mountain West Foot & Ankle Institute


Plantar Fasciitis Cures And Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Home remedy for plantar fasciitis and heel spur?
    Have you had surgery for a heel spur?
    My heel pain has been life changing; in a bad way.
    An X-ray revealed a heel spur caused by (or caused?) plantar fasciitis.
    The podiatrist gave me shoe inserts to take the pressure off of the heel with high arch support. He also gave me a prescription for NSAIDS.
    I want a cure!
    Do you have a home treatment that rid you of your heel spur permanently? What was it like? What were the results?
    Thanks for answering!

    • ANSWER:
      If you have a bone spur you most likely will have to have it shaved off.

      but if you do not have a spur and it is scar tissue you can treat it

      I have suffered from plantar fascitis for years (recuring)
      these are some of the things that have helped me
      I went to physio and this is what they told me to do.

      you have tendons on the bottom of your feet it is attached to the bottom of your heal bone when it shortens it can start to rip off of your heal bone and this will cause calcium buildup what we call a bone spur.

      there are some things that you can do to help.

      1) get wedge high heal sandals and shoes you want to make sure that they support your feet. make sure that they are no higher than 2 inches.
      if one inch makes your feet feel better ware them.

      make sure that you ware them any time you are on your feet even in the house.

      this will stop your from tearing that tendon any more.

      2) take an anti inflammatory your choice

      3) stretching exercises use heat before hand to make sure that the tendons are soft. either use a heating pad or hot water bottle. use the heat for 10 to 15 min’s
      the stretching you want to do are as follows
      A) while sitting on a chair bring your foot back so it is under the chair keeping your toes flat on the ground lift up your heal like you are taking a step make sure that you do not stretch too far (it should not hurt) hold for 15 sec’s repeat 4 more times do this with both feet 3 times a day.

      B) using a tennis ball or a soup can (on it’s side)
      put your foot on the can or ball in the arch of your foot again while sitting put some weight on it and roll it back and fourth. this will stretch out the tendon

      use ice 15 min’s after stretching it will help with the swelling

      4) use ice the best way is to get some of those small paper cups fill half full with water and freeze them. when you use them peel back the paper and rub on area make sure to keep it moving so you do not hurt the skin.

      5) keep your feet up. and try to stay off them as much as possible.

      6) go to the pharmacy and buy arch suports they will help also buy heal spur pads the ones that have a spot in the middle of the heal that you can take out this will help to releave pain.

      all of this will take months to make your pain to go away

      7) if the above does not help you can go to your family doc and get an injection of cortazone in your heal.

      8) if all else fails and the doc’s do beleive that you do have a spur you will have to have it filed off.

      9) to prevent this from happening in the future you will need to get good walking shoes ones that keep your heal slightly higher than the ball of your foot and have good arch suports.

  2. QUESTION:
    Anyone have Plantar Fasciitis?
    I’m 18 years old and I’ve had plantar fasciitis for three years. I’ve seen two different doctors and have done pretty much every treatment option available which ranges from physical therapy, cortisone injections, pills, and much more. Only treatment I haven’t tried is ESWT and surgery.

    I’ve had it for a very long time now and I’ve posted questions asking about plantar fasciitis several times before. I figured it wouldn’t hurt to try asking again.

    If you’ve ever had plantar fasciitis before, how did you cure it?

    I’m posting this in the Running section because this was an injury that I got three years ago (from running) and I’m hoping runners can answer this question better than the injury section. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Plantar Fasciitis is a painful inflammatory condition causing heel pain and in some people, heel spurs. It can also result in arch pain. Plantar Fasciitis is often caused by abnormal pronation of the foot and improper arch support. Contributing factors are weight gain, intense physical activity, jobs that require a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces, or shoes with poor arch support.

      Research has found that a combination of proper exercises and arch support by wearing orthotic insoles can provide effective relief for plantar fasciitis.

      An explanation of the importance that proper arch support plays in controlling over-pronation, and some stretching exercises for relief are provided in the links below:

  3. QUESTION:
    Have you had surgery for a heel spur?
    My heel pin has been life changing; in a bad way.
    An X-ray revealed a heel spur caused by (or caused?) plantar fasciitis.
    The podiatrist gave me shoe inserts to take the pressure off of the heel with high arch support. He also gave me a prescription for NSAIDS.
    I want a cure!
    Have you had surgery or another treatment that rid you of your heel spur permanently? What was it like? What were the cost to you and the results?
    Thanks for answering!

    • ANSWER:
      I had one in my early twenties under the ball of my foot that lasted a couple of years. They offered to do surgery but told me that might cause further issues, and the spur will eventually dissolve or disconnect and be absorbed into the body. So I waited. Sure enough, a few months later it was suddenly gone.

  4. QUESTION:
    knee pain (from overprotonation?)?
    I have developed plantar fasciitis a few months ago, I have done some research and know the cause and symptoms of pf, it’s not untill much research that I found out that there isn’t a one-and-all magical cure for pf. Treatment involves a combination of rest, icing, stretching, exercising and good supportive insole/shoe/orthotic.
    A much more complex problem than I had anticipated.
    Despite my efforts my pf have come and gone but it’s been much improved.
    So recently, these couples of days I’ve noticed that my right knee starts to hurt with intense activity, it’s like a burning sensation, right on the knee cap. I think the pain has something to do with my poorly managed pf and my flat feet.
    What type of specialist would be able to address this problem? Or if someone else has experienced something similar could give me some advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes it probably hurts due to your flat feet and plantar fasciitis because even though you may not notice it, you’re probably walking differently. And even a slight change can throw your body out of whack.

      I’d say to keep doing what you’re doing, especially wearing shoes with good arch support, and you should probably get a pair of those Dr. Scholl’s arch supports to wear with all your shoes, and you should notice the decrease of pain.

      It won’t be immediate, but if you keep doing that for several months…and I do mean wear an arch support with EVERY pair of shoes…it should get better.

      If you give it a few months, really doing all the things you mentioned above, because those are the right things to be doing, and the knee pain has still not lessened, an orthopedist should be able to help you.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have a medical mystery. Maybe someone can help me find the answer?
    I will try to keep this under 3000 words!
    One morning in November of 2003, I got out of bed and felt like I had stepped on a tack. My heel hurt so much. I know you are all thinking Plantar Fasciitis now, right? So were my 3 doctors. I went from referral to referral from conservative treatments to surgery and the pain only ever intensified and expanded.
    I started with tape and general orthopedics, ice, and stretching exercises, and then prednisone tablets and cortisone injections, then custom molded orthopedics, then tens units and some thing where they put my foot in a container of water and shocked the water. I then was prescribed special shoes, night splints, contniued shots/prednisone, finally had shockwave therapy in 2005 and after 2 more years of treatment, I had plantar fasciotomy surgery in 2007. The entire time, I kept complaining that my left heel hurt too, but the doctors never evaluated it. They said it was just compensation pain.

    After the surgery, at the 3 day mark, when I went back for a recheck and the doctor told me I would be walking normally, if not uncomfortably, I told him the pain was unimaginable.

    To keep a long story short, the pain intensified and began shooting out of my foot and up my leg. Same thing in my left foot. It got to the point where I could not walk. At all. I had 3 MRI’s done and then a nerve conduction test. The MRIs revealed no signs of plantar fasciitis in either foot, but showed a prolasped disc in my back.. The nerve conduction test reflected an impingement of two nerves at the L5-S1 vertebral column. I was thus sent to a back surgeon for the possiblity of having spinal surgery. Back surgeon said the nerve conduction test was wrong and there was no impingement on my back and the disc that was pushed out was not severe or terribly abnormal or compromising my back in anyway, he referred to the MRI for this.

    This was all up to Aug of 2008. I got sick and tired of it, and just stopped going to doctors all together. In Sept 2008, I started swimming. 5 years of battling this pain in my legs had led to weight gain and I wanted exercise that I could handle. Within 2 weeks of swimming, the pain 95% resolved. It is now February and the pain is about 50% back. I have not been swimming in the last 2 months because of the cold winter. I have been using an exercise bike instead. Both of my heels/arches/toes are in mild pain, the pain shoots up my legs into my knees and goes as high as my butt in my right leg and I get this very sharp pain shooting out horizontally from my lower back sometimes, like a spasm.

    So, if you’re still here after reading this book… what on earth else can this be?? Why can I not get a diagnosis, and most of all, a cure? Any suggestions?
    Guess I forgot to mention, I had been to 2 chiros and crunched and broken. I have never done accupuncture because I am terrified of needles. The nerve conduction was bad enough!

    I also have had a parasitology panel done, because I used to work around animals all day every day and the possibility of me inhaling/ingesting a parasite/spore existed. That was negative.

    I also have had general bloodwork done to rule out any type of kidney/liver or vitamin definciency involvement, and while I have never been seen by a herbologist, I have tried some Eastern medicine, a few pain relieving herbs with no success.

    • ANSWER:
      I really have no idea, especially considering the fact that you seem to be relieved of the pain when you swim, which would lead me to believe that the problem is muscular or something. But, I thought I’d make a couple suggestions:

      First, have you been to a chiropractor? Maybe it’s a back problem that for some reason wasn’t detected. The chiropractor might be able to help, since they normally have somewhat unconventional methods.

      My next suggestion is that you go to a much more unconventional doctor. This sounds strange, but I knew of a girl who suffered from severe pain in her arms and legs for about a year, and no one could figure out what was wrong. She went to some sort of herbal doctor or something (I’d suggest google) and discoverred that she had a tapeworm-like parasite that was slowly eating through her muscle. I dont think this is what you have because you felt some relief when swimming, and I can’t imagine that would help this situation, but it seems that you been through every single possible conventional medical option you have… why not try something less conventional?

      On a related note, I would second the first commentor’s acupuncture suggestion.

      Normally I don’t put much weight in unconventional methods, but in your case, it seems that’s the only thing you haven’t tried.

      Good luck!

  6. QUESTION:
    Surgery for a heel spur?
    Have you had surgery for a heel spur?
    My heel pin has been life changing; in a bad way.
    An X-ray revealed a heel spur caused by (or caused?) plantar fasciitis.
    The podiatrist gave me shoe inserts to take the pressure off of the heel with high arch support. He also gave me a prescription for NSAIDS.
    I want a cure!
    Have you had surgery or another treatment that rid you of your heel spur permanently? What was it like? What were the cost to you and the results?
    Thanks for answering!
    Correction
    Heel “pain” is what I meant to type :-]

    • ANSWER:
      I have used resting night splints with great success on many of my patients with plantar fasciitis. It works best for those who have sharp heel pain in the morning or after standing up from sitting for a while

      I have also seen stubborn cases of plantar fasciitis respond to special taping techniques and other forms of treatment offered by physical therapy.

      Have your doctor send you to a physical therapist, there is a lot they can do for you including massage, therapeutic ultrasound, anti inflammatory patches, exercises, ice posture/positioning, splinting, prevention etc.

      Performing a simple plantar fascia stretch several times a day, icing and using a plantar fasciitis resting night splint (can be purchased at most medical supply stores) may do the job.

      70 percent of the plantar fasciitis cases have some heel spurs and I have seen many cases resolve, Therefore the spurs themselves are not always the source of the pain.

      good luck